9

I've been to a lecture in which a Tibetan Buddhist monk (specifically, a nyingmapa) was asked the same question by a teenage girl. Basically, his answer was, such killing would both end some existing suffering and create some new suffering. Because regular person does not see all complexity of karma network spanning multiple lives, his or her acts are very ...


7

Sarcasm isn't a deliberate lie, because the intention isn't to lie or mislead, but it is wrong speech, because it has the capacity to hurt people. Per Buddhism, unless a statement is true and beneficial, it is not right speech. And joy derived from the suffering of others isn't wholesome. Ironically saying "You lied" to someone who is being obviously ...


7

I would suggest that it depends on how you relate to the success, your attitude to it. Relating an experience can be beneficial to the recipient in many cases, both in terms of use as a teaching and possibly of merit as you mention. In terms of telling about a successful experience as a teaching, this can be related to the Udayi Sutta in the Anguttara Nikaya,...


7

you said: One shouldn't attach him/herself (to material matters). One should move toward truthfulness in all things and correct harm. but... the second one does not sound like a Buddhist principle... where did you get that from? The first one (nonattachment, dispassion) is a universally valid Buddhist principle. As a rule of thumb I would stick ...


5

It doesn't square well against the notion of Right Action (or Right Conduct) on the Noble Eightfold Path. The practitioner should train oneself to be morally upright in one's activities, not acting in ways that would be corrupt or bring harm to oneself or to others. (source) (emphasis added) If going to work while ill could cause others to become ill, ...


4

The answer is up to you, since it will be you who affirms his power. Letting go of the outcome means that you can be ok with either decision, I.e. You can act accordingly either way without becoming attached and overcome with grief. If you let it be, so you let it be. Do you think that would be wise? If you follow it up, that's ok too. In the next instant, ...


4

The first thing that the story (i.e. "not got a particular position she rightfully deserved due to a conspiracy") reminded me of was verse 3 of the Dhammapada (i.e. "he robbed me" etc.). "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred. "He abused me, ...


4

Right effort(sammā-vāyāma) in terms of mindfulness is not a forceful , grit your teeth kind of effort. It's a moment by moment, continuous, good cyclical habit kind of effort. Cetanā is Pali for 1- intention 2- volition 3- directionality of mind 4- attraction 5- urge Intention(cetanā) can be defined as a mental factor that moves or urges the mind in a ...


4

Such texts should be read in context: written for and by the Sangha - and mostly for and by male-sangha, though you found one quote that sounds like a tired grandmother. Buddhism is really a dual religion. The religion for lay-people is very practical: attend to your duties and avoid wrong-doing. That includes taking care of any partner and children. ...


4

The motivation DOES make a difference to the karma of an action. The classic discussion about karma stresses motivation. Karma as action denotes an act of mental volition (cetanā), and the bodily and verbal actions that stem from it. (Classical Indian Buddhist Philosophy, by John Powers) This is almost literally from Vasubandhu's Abhidharma-kośa (...


4

From the Nibbedhika Sutta: "Intention, I tell you, is kamma. Intending, one does kamma by way of body, speech, & intellect. Also from Cetana Sutta (SN 12.38) below, we see that intention (cetana) provides a landing point for the continuation of karmic consciousness. [the Blessed One said,] "What one intends, what one arranges, and what one ...


4

There is no place for anger in Buddhism for any reason. Right effort is what is required.


4

In my experience, it's a kind of phase. First, you don't really strive, but you're intrigued by Dharma enough to keep learning hodgepodge and practicing once in a while. Then your perception of samsara becomes negative enough that finding the way out becomes an urgent matter. This is the phase when you strive. Some people are more extreme than others and so ...


3

the belief-desire-intention model of action Are the "four noble truths" an example of that? I "believe" the first three truths I "desire" the end of suffering Therefore I "intend" the fourth noble truth Or "ethics": I believe that immorality causes or doesn't alleviate suffering I wish to avoid causing suffering Therefore I intend to avoid immorality Or ...


3

The way Buddha explained these things, was not as much about justice/injustice as with references to how the world/society works. For example he would say, if someone were to rob people, he will likely get caught by the king and get his feet and hands cut off. Dharma is not as much about justice as it is about understanding how things work. Same way, when ...


3

Right Speech and Right Effort. Those are the two pieces of the Eightfold Path that will answer your question in regards to decisive action. What is Right Speech? What is Right Effort? Right Speech is speaking for a purpose that is beneficial to all parties involved and at the right time and in the right way (nicely, usually). In short, Speak effectively ...


3

I could easily have written your query. At this time however there are a few differences which may be helpful if shared. Am in my mid 40’s. Never thought that it was actually possible. Met a Venerable at the local Vihara who stated otherwise and has taken me under his wing so to speak with ordination to be the outcome. Yes, it’s a long road, lots to learn. ...


3

This is not lying unless you pretend or say you follow the advice. Dhamma practice is a gradual exercise hence one does not become perfect at once but it is a matter of putting int the effort to increase one's perfection: cultivate what is wholesome which one does not already do increase what is wholesome which one already does abandone what is unwholesome ...


3

If I don't react, am I not placing myself and others in harm's way by taking part in an enabling apathy? Given that anger is ineffective in that situation, I don't see how non-anger is enabling apathy. You seem to be keenly aware of the potential dangers of unsafe driving. I presume you act on that, when you're the driver yourself, or when you're a passenger ...


2

The purpose of mudita is counter against envy arising in ourself for others. The purpose of metta is to counter against hate arising for others. The purpose of karuna is to counter against cruelty for others. We don't do something to try to encourage metta in others, though we can teach. We don't do something to try to encourage karuna in others, .... ...


2

Lets take 2 examples where the action are the same: A surgeon takes a knife and cuts through a person's stomach to save his life A robber takes a knife and cuts through a person's stomach kill him and take his belongings In both cases the action is the same but what differs is the intentions. Hence it is the intention that counts. Now lets take another ...


2

Dependant origination(DO): depending on contact feeling arise, depending on feeling craving arise, ..craving..clinging, ..clinging..becoming, ..becoming.. there is birth. etc.. From contact until the point of birth there is no kamma (to be precise it's becoming). Birth of what? Birth of another thought, of a person committing an action good or bad. ...


2

As a householder and a lay person, I don't really feel that buddhist principles conflict with everyday life in any meaningful way. Just because you see your material belonging as what they are - be it an aggregate of stones, wood, cloth, or other synthetic material does not mean you have to allow others to damage or steal them. The pursuit of truth is ...


2

According to Mahayana (Yogacara) Abhidharma, cetana is connected with traces and dispositions (samskara) left by previous actions and experiences. (What follows is my understanding based on my study and practice. Not official but I did spend some time contemplating this stuff, and I think I've got some insights) Like you said, cetana can be kusala or akusala ...


2

It seems I don't know, don't understand, or don't agree with your definitions (of cetanā and sankappa). You start by assuming that there is wholesome and unwholesome cetanā: and then you ask whether there is wholesome and unwholesome sankappa. Firstly so far as I know there is definitely wholesome and unwholesome sankappa. I say that because Right Resolve (...


2

The wholesomeness and unwholesomeness and neutrality is decided by what you would perceive when you experience or feel the result. This is the differentiation between them. Generally aversion are painful when doing and so is when you get the result. Generally clining based acts are pleasant when doing and also when you get the result. Generally neutral ...


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