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5 votes

Why are children represented as inessential in some Buddhist text?

Such texts should be read in context: written for and by the Sangha - and mostly for and by male-sangha, though you found one quote that sounds like a tired grandmother. Buddhism is really a dual ...
Katinka Hesselink's user avatar
4 votes
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What is the importance of intention in Buddhism?

From the Nibbedhika Sutta: "Intention, I tell you, is kamma. Intending, one does kamma by way of body, speech, & intellect. Also from Cetana Sutta (SN 12.38) below, we see that intention (...
ruben2020's user avatar
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4 votes

What did the Buddha say about motivation?

Right effort(sammā-vāyāma) in terms of mindfulness is not a forceful , grit your teeth kind of effort. It's a moment by moment, continuous, good cyclical habit kind of effort. Cetanā is Pali for 1- ...
Lowbrow's user avatar
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4 votes
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Does any/every form of lying violate the precept of "not-lying"?

The motivation DOES make a difference to the karma of an action. The classic discussion about karma stresses motivation. Karma as action denotes an act of mental volition (cetanā), and the bodily ...
Katinka Hesselink's user avatar
4 votes
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Can anger be acceptable?

There is no place for anger in Buddhism for any reason. Right effort is what is required.
SarathW's user avatar
  • 5,607
4 votes
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The Intention to Strive

In my experience, it's a kind of phase. First, you don't really strive, but you're intrigued by Dharma enough to keep learning hodgepodge and practicing once in a while. Then your perception of ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
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3 votes

What could a lay follower do to increase his zeal to become a monk?

I could easily have written your query. At this time however there are a few differences which may be helpful if shared. Am in my mid 40’s. Never thought that it was actually possible. Met a ...
C Smith's user avatar
  • 409
3 votes

What did the Buddha say about motivation?

'Chanda' as an 'iddhipada', translated as 'zeal', 'desire', 'will', 'love'. I prefer 'devotion'. Some suttas: SN 51.15 and SN 51.20.
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
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3 votes

Why are children represented as inessential in some Buddhist text?

Having children is the opposite of enlightenment, as quoted in the question. However, for those who cannot overcome sensuality & cannot find happiness in meditation, having children can be ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
3 votes

Nature of Integrity in Buddhism

This is not lying unless you pretend or say you follow the advice. Dhamma practice is a gradual exercise hence one does not become perfect at once but it is a matter of putting int the effort to ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
3 votes
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Attitude towards harmful behaviors

If I don't react, am I not placing myself and others in harm's way by taking part in an enabling apathy? Given that anger is ineffective in that situation, I don't see how non-anger is enabling apathy....
ChrisW's user avatar
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3 votes

Is there a set of daily reminders and daily reflections one can contemplate on?

I use chanting and contemplations like... This body is relentlessly aging...now! The body’s health is temporary. It will decline, sicken and die. The dying process is happening. Everything I value ...
Kyoshin's user avatar
  • 51
3 votes

What did the Buddha teach regarding remorse?

This question is difficult for me. However, before exploring it, it must be highlighted the suttas do not praise remorse (vippaṭisārī), as shown in AN 5.142, below: One person neither transgresses ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
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3 votes

What did the Buddha teach regarding remorse?

Piya Tan translated the same as: Then, headman, a disciple has full confidence in that teacher. He reflects thus: ‘In many ways the Blessed One censures and blames the destruction of life, and he ...
ruben2020's user avatar
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2 votes
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Why are children represented as inessential in some Buddhist text?

You're asking whether "children" are unnecessary. And I'm still not sure what that means. There are children in the world regardless of whether you're a parent yourself, so it's not as if children ...
ChrisW's user avatar
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2 votes

Are there any teachings about how we should censure happiness which arises without right view?

The Buddhist tradition arose before the Socratic/stoic tradition and, since Greeks were very interested in Buddhism, it is likely the Socratic/stoic tradition was influenced by the Buddhist tradition. ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
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2 votes

Right effort and concentration

Right Efforts is about removing unwholesome states and cultivating wholesome states. Right Concentration deals with developing the Jhana as a means to displace certain subset of unwholesome states. ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
2 votes

Is working too much (for money) a form of indulgence?

Buddha admire wealthy people who earn their wealth by right lively hood. However he encourage people to use their wealth wisely for their benefit and the benefit of others. Link to two major Suttas ...
SarathW's user avatar
  • 5,607
2 votes

What is the proper way to foster generosity and gratitude?

Right resolve/intention(Samma Sankappa) has 3 parts: Nekkhamma Sankappa - thoughts of renunciation Avyapada Sankappa - thoughts of non-hate Avihimsa Sankappa - thoughts of non-cruelty So as you can ...
Sankha Kulathantille's user avatar
2 votes

What is the proper way to foster generosity and gratitude?

"Monks, these two people are hard to find in the world. Which two? The one who is first to do a kindness, and the one who is grateful for a kindness done and feels obligated to repay it. These ...
Samana Johann's user avatar
2 votes

What is the importance of intention in Buddhism?

The bodily action and the verbal action are just a body. The body can not act without vedanā, saññā, cetanā, and cittā. Without it, the body is like a piece of wood in sutta. See, cittajarūpa in ...
Bonn's user avatar
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2 votes

Can anger be acceptable?

All passions including anger are to be removed but until you achieve perfection don't cut too deep, don’t remove the passion against ignorance. Quoted below is from Shantideva's Bodhichryavatara / ...
Epic's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

Can anger be acceptable?

Anger is unskillful and destructive. Anger gains its power from a lack of restraint--we explode at a problem and obliterate/kill it. Strong anger leads to killing. Given that the first precept is &...
OyaMist's user avatar
  • 9,451
2 votes

Punk-Dhamma: Being intolerant to perceived intolerance - wrong view according to Dhamma?

DN 31 says: On what four grounds do they not do bad deeds? One does bad deeds prejudiced by favoritism, hostility, stupidity, and cowardice. When a noble disciple is not prejudiced by favoritism, ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
2 votes

Intention and Karma

Wholesome and unwholesome minds/types of consciousness, when ripen give rise to the respective resultant minds/types of consciousness. See: 89 / 121 types of consciousness Sati in the The 52 Mental ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
2 votes

Intention and Karma

For example, in the Theravada tradition I read that sati, i.e. mindfulness, is a beautiful mental factor. In a discussion with the Dalai Lama, Matthieu Ricard explains how even a sniper may use ...
santa100's user avatar
  • 9,679
2 votes

Nature of Integrity in Buddhism

There is a Sutta to say that there are four types of persons. A person who helps themselves but no help to others. A person who does not help themselves but help others A person who neither helps ...
SarathW's user avatar
  • 5,607
2 votes
Accepted

In what suttas are the "4 resolves" (adhiṭṭhānī) discussed?

MN 140. Bhikkhu, this person has four foundations.’ So it was said. And with reference to what was this said? There are the foundation of wisdom, the foundation of truth, the foundation of ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
2 votes

Xin Ling Fa Men 心灵法门 - New "Buddhism"?

There are a lot of people like this 'Master Lu' in the world, in every faith and religion, with small groups of followers or large. Most are honest, many are indifferent, some are charlatans, a few ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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