26

By trying to "control it", you are putting the (idea of) lust outside of yourself. In effect you are seeing "the lust" and yourself as two separate entities. That (conceived) separation sets up a duality. On one side is "lust", which it sounds like you are labeling as "bad". On the other side is self, which it sounds like you want to label as "good". ...


18

As one Tibetan lama explained in one lecture I attended, this type of anger comes from attachment to a certain form of clarity. Because in meditation you experience clarity born of unification of mind (lack of inner conflict), when in post-meditation a conflict between "is" and "should" arises, attachment to clarity leads to suffering, rejection of which ...


18

Since you are seeking inspiration similar to the simile how one should eat as if they are eating their own child having lost in a desert, to understand the drawbacks of lust, I think Alagaddupama Sutta is a good place where Buddha gave ten similes to understand the true nature of sensual pleasure. Here, Buddha says that one should see sensual pleasure as ...


14

When Buddha taught meditation he did not explicitly separate it in different types. If you read Anapanasati Sutta, Satipatthana Sutta, Kimattha Sutta, Cula-suññata Sutta, and any number of suttas mentioning the Jhanas, you will see that the overall progression is to first learn to pacify the mind at will, then learn to gladden the mind at will, then develop ...


13

One could "say" anything but that would only be a relative truth. Ultimately one person doesn't cause another persons anger. One causes their own anger. It is hard to understand ultimate reality unless one reflects within by atempting to experience things that arise in one's experience moment by moment in the present moment. Remembering to see things ...


12

As it was explained to me, we must master the coarse before we can master the subtle, and we must master the subtle before we can attain first-hand direct vision of Dharma. In this vein, during a single meditation session we must first work with the body, then work with the feelings, then work with the mind, and only then the insight meditation can happen ...


12

First of all, I think your question has gotten worse at explaining your condition through your edits (sorry!). In Theravada Buddhism, and really I think I speak for all of Buddhism when I say, the object is to understand reality as it is. This means you actually have to understand the experience before you can "fix" it. Actually, it means once you ...


12

For buddhists, mindfulness meditation and vipassana are pretty much the same. The pali word for mindfulness is sati and the main sutta that describes vipassana practice is the sati patthana sutta ("The four foundations of mindfulness" for one translation). However, the medical community (many non-buddhists) have stripped down this buddhist meditation into ...


11

It is more gentle than that. Consider the first tetrad of anapanasati: Breathing in long, he discerns, 'I am breathing in long'; or breathing out long, he discerns, 'I am breathing out long.' Or breathing in short, he discerns, 'I am breathing in short'; or breathing out short, he discerns, 'I am breathing out short.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe in ...


11

Lust is a biological impulse without which you would not have been born in the first place. So honor it and respect it as nature's method to keep our race going. Thus, realize it a powerful force and there are also repercussions to bashing it down or inhibiting yourself. Don't use any method that involves self-criticism, self-judgment, self-harm, hatred, ...


9

Meditation is not something made to clear our thoughts, it is impossible to do so, thoughts come and go, they will never stop, maybe you can increase the gap between thoughts, that is possible, however this is not the main goal of meditation. What you need to do is be mindful of your thoughts, be aware, see than as if you were anothet person, awake, dont ...


9

When it comes to developing concentration modern technology is definitely a distraction as devices tend to seek your attention. This leads to being scatter brained. This is the reason many meditation centres don't allow you to have them. Also modern life style has a lot of responsibilities, and leaves little time for spiritual practice. The society as a ...


9

The son's flesh simile is from SN 12.63 (Puttamansa Sutta: A Son's Flesh). Lust is a very powerful force and it'd need a combination of various strategies to counteract it, everything including diets, moral disciplines, persistence, etc. MN 20 (Vitakkasanthana Sutta: The Relaxation of Thoughts) suggests 5 helpful strategies to counter unwholesome thoughts: ...


9

A.K. It's not a foolish question at all, I think it's something everyone spends sometime trying to understand when they first start learning meditation and mindfulness. Mindfulness is being present. If you're sitting you know you're sitting, if you're standing you know you're standing. If you are washing dishes you are only washing dishes, you are not ...


8

You can feel anyone of them, but you have to use one of them for whole your meditation. I prefer breath. First you have to notice that you are inhaling when inhale and you have to notice that you are exhaling when you exhale. When you do that you may feel lot of things: pain in legs, scratches, mosquito bite like feelings. Just ignore them at once and ...


8

Once the practitioner attains certain level of mastery in meditation and mindfulness, their sleep acquires a character of meditation. It's not like they don't sleep at all, but they do retain certain level of deep awareness during their sleep. Specifically, when they see a dream, they know it's a dream. They remain aware of their body lying down on the bed. ...


8

In Kakacupama Sutta, the Buddha says: "Monks, there are these five aspects of speech by which others may address you: timely or untimely, true or false, affectionate or harsh, beneficial or unbeneficial, with a mind of good-will or with inner hate. Others may address you in a timely way or an untimely way. They may address you with what is true or what ...


8

How can I solve my problems if I'm not totally immersed in the future, thinking about all the possibilities? In a sense, the answer is because being immersed in the future is a large part of the problem. Buddhism doesn't recognize the things you call problems as real problems. They are conventional problems that only obtain the designation because of your ...


8

I'm guessing it sounded better in the original Burmese. "Imagining" seems more reasonable than "meeting", since the latter is not real. On the other hand, it is not so important whether the experience is "real", but that the experience is occurring, so it could potentially be beneficial to remind yourself of what is going on in your head as "meeting". Still,...


8

Mindfulness is very important, but it is part of the path, not the goal. It is the seventh of the eight factors of the Noble Eightfold Path, and the path can be grouped into three trainings. The wisdom training, the morality training, and the concentration training. Mindfulness falls under the training of concentration. In MN 29, the longer heartwood simile ...


8

The word dharma is understood to come from the Sanskrit root dhṛ - in regards to holding or keeping. The word has its history in the vedas, where the meaning is something that holds the world together (i.e. maintains order) - religious hymns, gods, etc. Later texts use the word to refer to the order itself - e.g. "going against dharma", etc. The ...


8

If you look at this article which describes The Noble Eightfold Path, Chapter VI: Right Mindfulness (Samma Sati) talks about "bare attention" Chapter VII: Right Concentration (Samma Samadhi) talks about "centering the mind on an object" So I think they're both Buddhist, but one is called "mindfulness" and the other "concentration".


8

The "five mindfulness trainings" obviously correspond to the traditional "five precepts". So you can find more (by other authors) on that subject by searching for "third precept", for example Buddhism and Sex. A lot of what what "appropriate ways" means is explained fairly clearly in the paragraph you referenced, i.e. True Love Aware of the suffering ...


8

It essentially doesn't change anything. If you look hard, that "I" was always an illusion. No matter where you try to draw a boundary - it is artificial: Does the body belong to the self or not? How about that constant flow of matter and energy in and out - at what point does it even belong to the body? Do thoughts belong to the self or not? You are ...


8

The way I was taught, is that mindfulness is not practiced in-and-of-itself; instead it comes from a critical attitude to ourselves, which in turns comes from a certain goal that we set for ourselves, a certain standard of behavior. For beginners, this goal or standard is the attitude of egolessness and non-attachment. We watch our reactions (thoughts, ...


7

According my understanding Anapana Sati meditation is consists of several steps depending on your level. Found this page written by Most Ven. Nauyane Ariyadhamma Mahathera (who is one of the best meditation teacher according to me) could be helpful to you. It is quite lengthy one, but please read through for better understanding. In the article Ven ...


7

If we take the Pali Canon as been the closest we have to the word of the Buddha then there isn't a wealth of specific meditation advice in there when compared to other types of advice such as ethical. However there are two sutras that do give specific advice these being Anapanasati Sutra (Mindfulness of breathing) Satipatthana Sutra (The Way of Mindfulness)...


7

Mindfulness or living in the present moment is not the same as not having goals or responsibilities. Instead it is about doing everything you do with full attention and without judgement. For example, an active and not very mindful person would drive a car, look at his watch to see what time it is, and nervously think about everything he still has to do ...


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