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8

It's not OK. “It’s not easy to teach the Dhamma to others, Ānanda. The Dhamma should be taught to others only when five qualities are established within the person teaching. Which five? “The Dhamma should be taught with the thought, ‘I will speak step-by-step.’ “The Dhamma should be taught with the thought, ‘I will speak explaining the ...


7

Disclaimer: My answers may lean towards the Theravada tradition. Does Buddhism believe in rebirth? Yes. But there is no permanent soul that transmigrates from one body to another. Instead, just as how the flame of one candle could light another, one is reborn with the final state of mind (representing the overall volitional tendencies cultivated during ...


7

I recommend you to read the Kasi Bharadvaja Sutta. Kasi Bharadvaja was a farmer who asked this exact question from the Buddha. Monks dedicate their lives to spiritual development. They do not have time to make money or do agriculture. They do not eat for sport or beautification. They only eat enough to maintain life so that they can work towards Nibbana. Yes,...


6

Karma works in this life too. If you are kind to people, you create friends, then friends will take care of you. This is called karma - creating conditions for your future, in this life. When you are driven by emotions, like obsession or negativity - you become kind of blind, so you create bad conditions for yourself. So seeing your mind and developing ...


5

The lay community consider it a privilege to offer Dana to monks. A monk is a special person who has given up the comforts of lay life in search of spiritual liberation. Offering Dana to such a being is very meritorious(refer to Dakkhina Vibhanga Sutta). So the monks are actually doing a favor to the laypeople by accepting it. When going on alms round, a ...


5

Yes. Generosity, kind words and helpfulness are all meaningful to the Buddha, however small. From Vaccha Sutta: "I tell you, Vaccha, even if a person throws the rinsings of a bowl or a cup into a village pool or pond, thinking, 'May whatever animals live here feed on this,' that would be a source of merit, to say nothing of what is given to human ...


4

Offering of alms to monks and nuns is likely different in Buddhist minority countries, compared to Buddhist majority countries. Please see this page by the Buddhist Society of Western Australia (BSWA), for a guide on offering food to the Sangha of BSWA. Please see this page by the Amaravati Buddhist Monastery in Hertfordshire, England, for a similar guide. ...


4

From this guide for laypersons interacting with monks: The Buddha suggested that the basic source of food for bhikkhus was that received on the morning alms round (pi.n.dapaata). This daily dependence on alms food reminds both the bhikkhus and the lay devotees of their interdependence and prevents the bhikkhu from becoming too isolated from the ...


4

Yes (I think some gifts may have a poisonous effect), and so perhaps should care who you give to, and what. You might also be careful about what you accept -- someone who only accepts what they need might not have that problem. Another problem (that could poisoning the giver) might be giving with or because of some attachment, e.g. because you want ...


3

A bhikkhu is literally 'one who lives by alms'. However, it is not the same as a beggar because the laity that provide the alms get something in return - access to the wisdom and insight of the bhikkhu. Kasi Bharadvaja Sutta gives the Buddha's words to a confrontational Brahmin who refuses to give alms to the Buddha because he does not believe the Buddha '...


3

In Buddhism the merit created is greater if you give food to a monk when compared with giving to a prisoner for example, it doesn't mean you should not help the prisoner, it means that you create more merits by helping pure and enlighted beings to survive, there are many stories on the dhammapada about it. Think as if you are helping the Sangha to survive, ...


3

Mr./ Mrs. Smith, that is a very thoughtful question. Generally you may offer what ever you feel inspired or feel that it is of use, regardless if the Monk might be allowed or willing to receive, would deed in intention is done. Some give a flower, just picked for their joy, some a shady seat to rest, some a joyful and devoted bow or folded hands, some a wish ...


3

Charity is recommended as a practice as it cultivates Metta(kindness), Karuna(compassion) in the mind. Buddhism does not say to be selective when you are giving for charity. It just mentions that giving to virtuous beings is more meritorious and the way one should give gifts. "Selfless" here means "concerned more with the needs of others than with one's ...


3

"Compassion is characterized as promoting the aspect of allaying suffering. Its function resides in not [enduring] others' suffering. It is manifested as non-cruelty. Its proximate cause is to see helplessness in those overwhelmed by suffering. It succeeds when it makes cruelty subside, and it fails when it produces sorrow." -Visuddhimagga Compassion is a ...


3

Gharāvāsa (layman) = ghara (house) + vasa (living) = the person who live in the house with 5 kāmaguṇa, the cause of disturbance, such as color, sound, smell, taste, and touch. And if you even read M.N. Mūlapaṇṇāsaka mahādukkhakkhandhasutta, 5 kāmaguṇa also included the lay-style-job for sustenance, too. Samaṇa (monk) = sama (peace) + ṇa (person) = the ...


3

Here are a couple of lines of Pali (the first two lines of the verse at the end of the sutta): “Yo dhammayāgaṃ ayajī amaccharī, Tathāgato sabbabhūtānukampī ; Here are the same lines from the translation quoted in the question: He who, unstinting, made the mass-donation of Dhamma, Here are the same lines from another translation: The Tathāgata has made ...


3

In the traditional presentation, pretta (hungry ghosts or shadows) are stuck in a (subjective) world where everything is fake, particularly food - including the metaphorical food of love - but also anything of value: gold, gems, everything. Even friendship is fake. Even Dharma is fake. They see something that looks like it might be real, and being ...


3

Hm. What exactly will this person be teaching you? Buddhist philosophy? Proper sitting posture? Some special 'technique'? Most buddhist things you can learn for free from other teachers, so in what way are this person's teachings special or unique, so that you'd be willing to fork out an hourly rate? Don't get me wrong, I'm not against the idea of ...


3

It should be not understood as "rejection" or disprove if offered isn't made use of, good householder, can have many reasons, often Vinaya. Ones act of merits (if meritorious intended) within such giving still presist and not touched by the receivers circumstances, deeds on it. Noble Ones (as well those understanding Vinaya an following it) do not ...


2

Well, if you are a layman looking for free food, come to Sri Lanka during the Vesak or Poson full moon poya days. You will find many free food outlets. Usually you can get rice & curry, noodles, sandwiches, ice cream, various beverages etc. If you are a monk, you can go on alms round on any day. You will be offered food in most cities. If you're ...


2

The Pali text talks about 14 suitable gifts. http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/various/wheel367.html#pali THE DONATIONS Practically anything useful can be given as a gift. The Niddesa (ND.2, 523) gives a list of fourteen items that are fit to be given for charity. They are robes, almsfood, dwelling places, medicine and other requisites ...


2

Here are two quotes from The Perfection of Giving (Acariya Dhammapala), When the Great Man (the Bodhisatta) gives an external object, he gives whatever is needed to whomever stands in need of it; and knowing by himself that someone is in need of something, he gives it even unasked, much more when asked. He gives sufficiently, not insufficiently, when ...


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