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13 votes
Accepted

Can being a vegetarian actually be a temporary hindrance for some?

I have been vegetarian since 1/1/2000. It was originally a New Years Resolution, but it became a New Millenia Resolution. I figured that given impermanence it would not be too hard to keep. :D That ...
OyaMist's user avatar
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13 votes

Is making art bad or sinful?

Art can be a continuation of samsaric inertia, or it can be an expression of the enlightened mind. What message are you sending with your art? What impulse does it carry forward into the future?
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58k
10 votes
Accepted

Killing a bigger animal causes more bad karma than killing a smaller animal?

My knowledge in Buddhism is quite poor. IMO it is a greater sin to kill a larger animal than to kill a smaller animal but this cannot be the case always! Let me ask you a question. Which is easier, to ...
Heisenberg's user avatar
10 votes

Is there a way to wipe out ones Karma?

You are asking not about how to eliminate kamma, but about how to escape the results of kamma. There is no escape from the experience of the results of kamma. What there is is modification of the ...
Mike Olds's user avatar
  • 101
9 votes

Can somebody remove their bad karma by believing that it doesn't exist?

You are expressing the stock definition of 'wrong view': And how is right view the forerunner? One discerns wrong view as wrong view, and right view as right view. This is one's right view. And what ...
Ilya Grushevskiy's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

If someone steals my goods/harms me then is it ok to take revenge on him/her?

I think that the opening verses of the Dhammapada, for example, make it clear that "revenge" is not a way to appease emnity; and that "the wise" would "cease their quarrels" instead. "He abused ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.3k
9 votes

Crippling fear of hellfire &, damnation, please help?

I hope SN 42.6 quoted below will give you comfort. A person's actions while they were alive determines their outcome, and not rituals performed after death. Then Asibandhaka’s son the chief went up ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 36.7k
8 votes

Where do “new” humans come from?

We are not necessarily re-incarnations of prior human beings. There are 31 planes of existence in Buddhism. So the present human beings could result from any of the 26 planes out of 31 planes of ...
Sajeewa Welendagoda's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Is Karma different for accidental killing than intentional killing?

The background story to the first verse of the Dhammapada is of an arhat killing insects accidentally, because he's blind. The verse says, All mental phenomena have mind as their forerunner; they ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.3k
8 votes

Is rebirth essential to Buddhist philosophy?

From Ven. Bodhi's excellent short essay "Dhamma Without Rebirth?": The aim of the Buddhist path is liberation from suffering, and the Buddha makes it abundantly clear that the suffering from which ...
santa100's user avatar
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8 votes
Accepted

"Lower rebirth" -- Are animals really "lower" than us?

So can I still be a Buddhist, with these beliefs? Yes of course. Maybe don't over-idealise animals though, e.g. a real dog might chase and kill grass-hoppers or mice or anything else unless you stop ...
ChrisW's user avatar
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8 votes

Invalid logic pertaining to karma in sutta AN 5.129?

The way my first teacher explained karma, it works like a matching machine, it just puts the "victim" in the situation when the odds of encountering a certain kind of people are increased. It's like, ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58k
7 votes

Law of Karma in the Buddha's own words

Ven Bodhi discusses this matter and quotes relevant suttas in his "In the Buddha's Words" chapter V "THE WAY TO A FORTUNATE REBIRTH". The following list, which was posted on SuttaCentral, is a ...
Баян Купи-ка's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

what the buddha said about his own karma?

what the buddha said about his own karma? The Buddha mentioned that there were 8 past Karma which were effective even after becoming Buddha. See: Why the Buddha Suffered - Apadāna 39.10 but i am ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
7 votes

Can bad kammas be eased by apologizing?

Apologizing is good Karma that has a mitigating(not delete) effect on the bad Karma you had committed: ex: The story of Soreyya. Devadatta taking refuge of the Buddha just before being swallowed by ...
Sankha Kulathantille's user avatar
7 votes

Can bad kammas be eased by apologizing?

For example if i have lied to my parents and can the bad kamma be deleted when i apologize to them? You can neutralise Karma when the result is felt [Sañcetanika Sutta] or by diluting the result of ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
7 votes

If there's no "self" then why should I care about the future lives and nirvana?

Whether you believe in a 'self' or not, suffering is very real. You experience it on a daily basis. It is this suffering that makes beings look for an end to it. There's only one permanent end to ...
Sankha Kulathantille's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Can somebody remove their bad karma by believing that it doesn't exist?

When you follow through with an actions the motivation can be either wholesome or unwholesome . If it is wholesome then the roots are greedlessness, hatelessness, undeludedness (alobha, adosa, amoha) ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
7 votes

What are the characteristics of karmaless action?

What are the characteristics of karmaless action? It leads to dispassion. Meaning, it's an action that reduces both karmic as well as mental / emotional entanglement. Normal pathological action ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58k
7 votes

How can Buddhism help me to get rid of a suffering due to a disease?

I don't know your situation and haven't suffered anything like it, so any advice I have may mean nothing to you, but I will say these things: Karma is the fruit of past action. Don't concern yourself ...
rob_mtl's user avatar
  • 796
7 votes

"Lower rebirth" -- Are animals really "lower" than us?

Personally I would rather come back as an animal than a human. They seem more peaceful, humans are constantly thinking and doing and stressing about things. Be very careful what you wish for. You ...
santa100's user avatar
  • 9,669
7 votes

My job requires me to shuck oysters

According to the Bhikkhu Patimokkha (quoted below), which are rules for monks, killing a human is grounds for immediate and irreversible dismissal from the monastic order (parajika). However, ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 36.7k
7 votes

Will working for a company that engages in animal experimentation to alleviate suffering of humans be wrong livelihood?

I think wrong livelihood for lay-people is narrowly defined in the suttas -- in AN 5.177: Monks, a lay follower should not engage in five types of business. Which five? Business in weapons, business ...
ChrisW's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

Will working for a company that engages in animal experimentation to alleviate suffering of humans be wrong livelihood?

The commentary to Dhammapada 124 reads: Then the Buddha returned to the monastery and told Thera Ananda and other bhikkhus about the hunter Kukkutamitta and his family attaining Sotapatti Fruition in ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 36.7k
6 votes

As a disciple of the Supreme Buddha, what would you do with an animal that is in severe pain?

My mother and I saw a cat today by the side of the road, which had probably been hit by a car. Its back legs were outstretched, it didn't walk, I guessed its lower back was broken. It miaowed to us. ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.3k

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