10 votes

Why is there even a way to the end of suffering?

In MN64, the Buddha discusses the conundrum of identity and the presumed immaculate innocence of infants: MN64:3.3: For a little baby doesn’t even have a concept of ‘identity’, so how could identity ...
OyaMist's user avatar
  • 9,423
9 votes
Accepted

I would like to become Buddhist

I've heard that they don't believe in any god. It depends on what you mean by God. Buddhism does not have the concept of a almighty, creator (deism), sustainer, creator plus sustainer (theism), ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
8 votes

Hesitation between Buddhism and Advaita Vedanta

If you want to know the truth about reality, you have to learn how to make impartial observations of nature. When you ask questions like "Who is waking up? Who is witnessing?", you have already made ...
Sankha Kulathantille's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Buddhism on We are all one

OP: Is it right from a Buddhist point of view to say that you and me are the same because there is only one consciousness playing different minds (egos, personalities, psychologies, etc) and bodies ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 36.9k
7 votes

I would like to become Buddhist

You don't believe in any God. Ok. You don't believe in rituals. Ok. Very likely you already don't. So why Buddhism? I'd like to make an important point here stating that Buddhism is anything but a ...
esh's user avatar
  • 2,244
7 votes

"Human Dignity" in Buddhism

Dignity in Buddhism is not built-in, it is to be earned. A realized person is respected because they deserve to be respected. If someone can control one's emotions, does not fall victim to one's ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k
7 votes

What does Buddhism say about how to manage other people's anger?

A very apt verse in the case of anger is this one from Dhammapada - Na Hi Verena Verani - Hatred is never appeased by Hatred. It is appeased only by loving kindness. Here is the Dhamma talk by Ven. ...
TheDarkKnightRules's user avatar
7 votes

Are there any body who achieved Nibbana currently (in the current world)

The Pali scriptures describe 4 levels of enlightenment, which equate to 4 levels of Nibbana. The Nakhasikha Sutta states in the 1st level of enlightenment the vast majority of the previous suffering ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.6k
7 votes

Is an 'Existential Crisis' a necessary condition to start on the path of Dhamma?

AN 3.38 describes Gotama having an existential crisis. Even though I was endowed with such fortune, such total refinement, the thought occurred to me: 'When an untaught, run-of-the-mill person, ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.6k
7 votes
Accepted

The invariant law of nature which forms the basis of Buddha's Dharma and existence of universe itself

As the Buddha explained many times, it's not 'Y => X', it's '(A,B,C,D..Q) => X'. In other words, every individual phenomenon that we can call out and delineate in a spatiotemporal continuum of ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k
6 votes

Does meditation giving you 'joy' because there is lack of suffering, or does it give something positive?

Both. Meditation when done properly will allow one to abandon the Five Hindrances (greed, anger, sloth/torpor, restlessness, doubt); and give rise to the Five Jhana Factors where each factor counters ...
santa100's user avatar
  • 9,679
6 votes

Is change permanent?

Change is permanent. The Laws of Nature (Dhamma) are permanent. The unchanging Nibbana (Nirvana) is also permanent. Buddhism explains only conditioned things (sankhara) are impermanent; thus ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
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6 votes
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Why is there no self in the container of the 5 aggregates?

This is the problem with mixing up ultimate reality with conventional reality. In ultimate reality, the cat does not exist. What is real is the tactile experience of the touch. That experience is an ...
Sankha Kulathantille's user avatar
6 votes

Is the experience of suffering or enjoyment completely reducible to physics e.g. such as in materialist views i.e. materialism?

Your question is quite interesting because it starts out with an openness regarding identity view. Awesome! You ask about what is and are puzzled at the rise of feelings pleasant, painful or neutral. ...
OyaMist's user avatar
  • 9,423
6 votes

Did the Buddha according to the suttas mean anything else by the word "self" beyond simply the aspect of control/power?

This is a very famous line of argumentation in Buddhism, especially in Theravada, about no-self. The basic idea is that according to common sense, we can control ourselves by the power of will - move ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k
6 votes
Accepted

How would Buddhists reply to this paradox of enlightenment

I'll try to relate that to what the suttas say. Enlightenment is inherently desirable I'm not sure what "enlightenment" is -- i.e. what, in Buddhist doctrine, is translated as "...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.5k
6 votes

How would Buddhists reply to this paradox of enlightenment

"There’s a passage where Ven. Ananda is being questioned by a brahman. The brahman has come to see Ananda in the park where he’s staying and asks him, “What is the purpose of this path you follow?...
Antony Woods's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Is it possible for a human being to live without the mind?

To answer this question accurately is very difficult if you are not a scientist but often people have accidents that results in them being in a coma for an extended period, where their physical body ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.6k
5 votes

Be like water - but what if i fail

If "be like water" is Buddhist, it sounds to me like an Eastern form of it (i.e. Chan or Zen). One view/aspect of Chan or Zen is that it's the result of Buddhism's mixing with Taoism. If you want to ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.5k
5 votes
Accepted

Life Duration and Rebirth

Life expectancy (Ayu-Kalpa) changes, but not related to any individual's progress. This is related to the whole society itself. Ayu-Kalpa - a variable time span representing the life expectancy of ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Schopenhauer’s inexplicable disturbance in the heavenly calm of Nirvana?

There is a similar question here: What is the starting of Samsara?. I would be surprised if there was any Buddhist reference supporting Schopenhauer's claim that "the world came into being as a ...
Tenzin Dorje's user avatar
  • 4,946
5 votes

How does a Buddhist survive in a harsh world?

So this raises a dilemma. Continue being gentle and compassionate with loving kindness, and get eaten. Or react harshly when necessary and risk darkening ourselves. Or, is there a proper middle path? ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.5k
5 votes

Question about the contrast between Buddhist statements and Christian doctrine

The word 'Buddha' means 'Enlightened'. It is the Buddha that is the light of the world. Buddhism states there can be only one Original Buddha in a world-system (MN 115). Jesus was a new light for ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.6k
5 votes
Accepted

Everything I do is motivated by greed/aversion. How to react?

It is actually a nice realization, to see oneself like you did. I remember when I got mine, I was about 20 - and I was shocked to realize all my re-actions were motivated by desire to make myself look ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k
5 votes
Accepted

What is yoniso manasikara and ayoniso manasikara?

The way my teacher explained it to me, we can either be masters of our mind, masters or information (=wise attention), or our mind can be our master, information can be our master (=unwise attention). ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k
5 votes

What is intellect-consciousness and why is it different from intellect itself?

This is just bad translation. "Consciousness" is the common word for vijnana. A better translation of vijnana is "(subjective) experience". Meaning, you see something => you recognize it => you make ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k
5 votes

When to let things let go and when to fight for them?

I think the best message on this topic is the Akkosa Sutta: Insult (SN 7.2) -- about insult and anger: The first message is that, in order to not accept an insult, don't (violently) reject it, just ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.5k
5 votes

Did the Buddha ever define what he meant by "self"?

"Self" is this highly childish, simplified, vague, unexamined idea in your mind: "This is me". It's not a concrete thing, it's an overall thing, it's a blob: "I am such, overall". It's an ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k
5 votes

Apparently stream-entrants are destined to attain Nibbana but what about non-stream-entrants?

Say, you wanted to lose weight and stay healthy. If you have no idea about Calories, Carbs, Fat, and Exercise - you may spend years randomly trying all types of foods, fasting, etc. - your weight ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.3k

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