13

The concept of Kamma implies that information is stored in the mind No, it does not! Information and storage are concepts. Not realities! The issue here is, we make the assumption that for causes to give an effect in the future, something needs to persist in the interim. When you commit a Kamma, the action is done and finished then and there. There's ...


8

If you want an abhidhamma answer, you have to speak in abhidhamma terms. "Wishing for pain to go away" is a sutta statement. It involves a wisher, and describes a sutta action. lobha and dosa cannot arise in the same citta, certainly. They are mutually exclusive cetasika that arise in the javana cittas of the process of a single experience, and all ...


8

This passage is according to the abhidhamma treatment of the attainment of nibbana. The two to three mind moments (yes, that's what it means) are called anulomañāṇa ("anuloma~naa.na") - knowledge of conformity, the twelfth stage of knowledge. The Visuddhimagga (XXII.128) describes this according to the abhidhamma: 128. As he repeats, develops and ...


8

There are two types of nirvana: saupādisesa-nibbāna (nirvana with remainder) and anupādisesa-nibbāna (nirvana without remainder) (Iti. 44). It is true that for one who has attained anupādisesa-nibbāna there will be no more consciousness. This is because someone who has attained anupādisesa-nibbāna is dead*. It is the equivalent to the more familiar ...


6

When the mind takes Nibbana as the object, all experiencing cease. But when enlightened beings do day to day activities, Nibbana is not the object of the mind. They do feel pain since there is experiencing. But they do not suffer. Being conscious of the pain is different from suffering due to pain.


6

It's a translation issue. The Pali terms are Hiri and Ottappa, and they are hard to translate into English because they have no one word equivalents. Hiri refers to the feeling of not wanting to do a bad deed because you know the deed itself is bad, and Ottappa refers to the feeling of not wanting to do an evil deed because you know that the consequences of ...


5

There are ten fetters eliminated in Vipassana meditation. Elimination does not occur before you reach the Sothapanna(stream enterer) state. Until then, fetters are only subdued. Once a fetter is eliminated, it's gone for good. Refer to the table below to know the fetters eliminated at each stage of the path. Yes, if you stop doing vipassana short of ...


5

A self wouldn't help in this case; a self is an untenable entity - it is permanent yet able to change to know multiple objects, an illogical paradox. The very idea that a memory can be stored isn't tenable, because memories don't exist, just as "information" doesn't exist. The "information" stored in the brain or on a floppy disk isn't information, it's ...


4

According to the Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi's book A Comprehensive manual of Abhidhamma, Chapter 3 Guide to §8 : The word bhavanga means “factor (anga) of existence (bhava),” that is, “the indispensable condition of existence.” Bhavanga is the function of consciousness by which the continuity of the individual is preserved through the duration of any ...


4

The "Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma" is an excellent translation of the Abhidhammattha Sangaha with extensive explanation / charts by Bhikkhu Bodhi. It can be legally downloaded from: CMA There are scanned copies of some of the Abhidhamma Pitaka available at: Dhammasangani Pali English Vibhanga Pali English The Pali versions appear to be legal, the ...


4

The Manual of Abhidhamma says, With His supernormal knowledge the Buddha analysed this so-called paramàõu and declared that it consists of paramatthas—ultimate entities which cannot further be subdivided. The paramatthas are pañhavi, àpo, tejo, and vàyo. One must not understand that these elements are earth, water, fire and air as some ...


4

Vottapana is a Citta(thought moment) that has the function of determining or decision making. It is not a result of past Kamma. But it is not a self either. There's no 'I' in it. Why? Because it is also born of causes and impermanent like any other Citta. there is no control and yet I can control my reactions to situations. Is there only a sense of ...


4

Mettā: Commonly translated as Loving Kindness which is simply because a group at PTS chose that over a century ago and that just stuck. The problem with that is that sometimes people already have associations with the English words “loving” and “kindness”, put them together and think “well, now I know exactly what mettā means.” Some other translations: ...


4

Space is a derived quality of matter, so consciousness cannot be said to take up or exist in space. To say that the mind arises here or there is not really proper in an ultimate sense. Consciousness can arise based on physical entities, and hadaya vatthu is the base for both the mind element and mind consciousness element. This doesn't mean that ...


4

Mendis refers to “Theravāda tradition”. His source is the introduction to the Atthasālinī, which was compiled by Buddhaghosa in about 400 AD based on earlier texts that no longer exist. The Abhidhamma is a framework that consolidates teachings from more than 10,000 Suttas. This framework follows the Theravāda perspective. IMHO, the scholar’s view that the ...


3

In the arupa worlds you cannot hear the Dhamma as you do not have this faculty, also the mental process is too subtle making it not possible to meditate on it. But if you have experiences even the 1st state of sainthood you can progress from here to the final goal. By the way, living in an arupa world would imply in my understanding that it is possible ...


3

From my understanding of Buddhism, there are no memories from beyond. Everything including memories are impermanent. There is no permanent memory-self that remains from moment to moment.


3

As far as I know, there is no single compiled translation of all the volumes of the Abhidhamma but they are separately translated by several people. You can find an index of these translations in ATI's Abhidhamma Page. Note that, although no English translation of the "The Book of Pairs" (Yamaka) is mentioned in the above link, there is one. You can find ...


3

The distinction goes back all the way to Buddha's students' original Maha-Sangha and its two sub-schools Bahushrutiya and Prajnaptivada. From Wikipedia: According to Paramārtha, the Bahuśrutīya school was formed in order to fully embrace both "conventional truth" and "ultimate truth." and The Prajñaptivādins were early articulators of the two truths ...


3

Nama-rupa & the five aggregates are taught for different purposes. The five aggregates are objects of insight. 'Such is form, such its origination, such its passing away. Such is feeling, such its origination, such its passing away. Such is perception, such its origination, such its passing away. Such are fabrications, such their origination, ...


3

As you mentioned, Chapter IV of the Sangaha describes citta vithi. The Visuddhimagga includes many partial references (look under "cognitive series" in the index) but no complete analysis. Clearly, the material in the Sangaha is a later development of what is found in the Visuddhimagga (perhaps 500 years earlier). The material in the Visuddhimagga is a later ...


3

My teacher said, this happens for two reasons: students don't meditate and students read books without talking to live Buddhist teachers (former students who got it) to get a sense of high-level meaning and practical real-life implications. Because of this, students don't see how the teaching connects with real life. Since they don't see how the teaching ...


3

Cittas are classified in various ways. One such classification is according to their nature. In this classification we have: Cittas which are resultant states of consciousness, vipaaka, the effects of previous kamma. Cittas which are causes for action (kamma) through body, speech, or mind. We may call these "causative cittas." A wholesome citta (kusala ...


3

All words are like sign posts. The meaning of it is an idea that is in the mind of the person who is speaking it. And the communication will take place if the person who hears it has assigned the same meaning to the word in his/her mind. Therefore the shared meaning has to be previously agreed upon or communication will not be very effective. As a result it ...


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