15

For most people God is a dualistic concept. Meaning, for a typical person the unspoken assumption is: "I am here and God is over there". So when I think about God, when I speak to God -- I inevitably imagine some power outside of myself. It is in this power that I place hope for good life and for salvation; it is this power that I blame for unfairness etc. ...


11

First, some canonical background: According to the Acintita Sutta, speculating on the origin of the cosmos or similar topics will lead one to confusion i.e. it cannot be understood. According to the Cula-Malunkyavada Sutta in the Parable of the Poisoned Arrow, the speculation of the origin of cosmos or suffering or similar topics is not useful, because the ...


10

"Monks, I will teach you the All. Listen & pay close attention. I will speak." "As you say, lord," the monks responded. The Blessed One said, "What is the All? Simply the eye & forms, ear & sounds, nose & aromas, tongue & flavors, body & tactile sensations, intellect & ideas. This, monks, is called the All. [1] ...


10

Well, here's my take on Identity view. I think it's relatively compatible with the Sutras, but should not be considered an exposition of them. First, what is this "self"? One answer is that it's your reaction when contemplating the following questions... 1. When you feel pride in an accomplishment, what is the recipient of this pride? 2. When you feel ...


8

Sounds like Wikipedia is suffering from some Buddhist fervour of its own... ;) Can I interpret the first of the eightfold path as scientific fervor ? Right view has nothing to do with fervour; it refers to one's outlook or point of "view". The word "diṭṭhi" literally means "way of seeing". As the commentary explains it: sammādassanalakkhaṇā sammādiṭṭhi ...


7

From my perspective, when it comes to eradication of identity view, there is analytical level, and then there is the level of day-to-day intuitive action. On analytical level, it is a clear direct understanding that: the boundaries of ("external") entities are conventional designations; thoughts come from perceptions plus associative memory, not "I think"; ...


7

There were fourteen questions to which Buddha remained silent. The universe is eternal, The universe is not eternal.. were two of them. Read the following sutta. MN 63 - Cula-Malunkyovada Sutta: The Shorter Instructions to Malunkya One day a man called Malunkyaputta approached the Buddha and demanded that He explain these questions to him. He even ...


6

Is there a better (than Wikipedia) explanation why we should not reflect on these questions? Perhaps a better explanation is the Sabbasava Sutta itself. The 'unwise reflections' are diverse (16 if you count them) opinions about the 'self': "This is how he attends inappropriately: 'Was I in the past? Was I not in the past? What was I in the past? How was ...


6

For completeness, there isn't one Buddhism, there are many Buddhisms. The other questions already address the Buddhisms with either no god or no interesting and relevant gods. By a process of fascinating evolution, Buddhism evolved from early Buddhism, which arguable didn't care or want take a stand on gods or their lack there of, to one that said Gods ...


6

Samma Sankappa (right thinking) is the result of right view (Samma Ditthi). If you have the wrong view your thinking will be wrong thinking. (Mittcha Sankappa) Generally, right view is the forerunner for the rest of the Noble Eightfold Path. For example seeing things as impermanent is the right view and seeing things as permanent is the wrong view. With the ...


6

This is a long answer (below), so here is a summary up front: "In Buddhism, what does it mean to hold a view?" I think it means to get attached to a view, maybe to rejoice in or to delight in a view, like attaching to a sense-object -- especially a wrong view, such as "delight in being" (bhavaratā). "Or, are there various types of wrong views and the lists ...


5

Lokavipatti Sutta on the eight worldly winds: Monks, these eight worldly conditions spin after the world, and the world spins after these eight worldly conditions. Which eight? Gain, loss, status, disgrace, censure, praise, pleasure, & pain. These are the eight worldly conditions that spin after the world, and the world spins after these eight worldly ...


5

This is one of the interesting aspects of Buddhism, that in its ideal form it doesn't allow prejudice (valid or otherwise) to interfere with the teaching. The Buddha taught people of all sorts, good and bad. "Brethren, the omniscient Buddha whose wisdom is vast, ready, swift, sharp, crushing heretical doctrines, after having converted, by the power of his ...


5

"Presumably, 'eradication of identity-view' is more than simply claiming, 'Yes, there's no self anywhere!!'" From [my understanding of] the Theravada standpoint, in terms of practice, it is definitely more than simply claiming something like that. "So, how should one understand what 'identity-view' is" [edited]: I suppose there is no other way but to ...


5

Is identity-view the same then as being aware that skandhas exist? The same as being attracted to (clinging to) sense-objects? Isn't the answer to that, "No that's not true, because 'sensual desire' is the fourth fetter"? The Samanupassana Sutta might help you in answering some of the questions you asked above. I think the Samanupassana Sutta makes ...


5

The Buddha used to remain silent, when Hindu Brahmins used to ask him about his views on God. He used to give the example of a man carrying a lamp and walking along a village road in the night, trying to reach another village. Human knowledge is like that, he used to say, it can show you the path as you travel along, but it cannot give you the knowledge of ...


5

The Pali is 'kataññutā' & also 'kataññutā kataveditā'. 'Kataññutā' means 'what others have done for us'. 'Kataveditā' means 'what we must do in return'. Kataññu (adj.) [cp. Sk. kṛtajña] lit. knowing, i. e. acknowledging what has been done (to one), i. e. grateful often in combn with katavedin grateful and mindful of benefits Kataññutā (f.) [...


5

No. I'd say that Buddhism is or can be pro (in favour of) a scientific attitude. The structure of the four noble truths, for example, are analogous to medical thinking: symptoms, cause, cure, and prescription (or, possibly, analogous to the "scientific method": observations, hypothesis, prediction, and experiment). Also there are different types of "desire"...


5

Your premise is that the Buddha taught a different Dhamma to householders, compared to monks. This is incorrect, as according to SN 42.7, the Buddha taught the same Dhamma to monks, lay followers and non-Buddhists alike: “Sir, doesn’t the Buddha live full of compassion for all living beings?” “Yes, chief.” “Well, sir, why exactly do you teach some ...


5

The Lump of Foam Sutta states: Form is like a lump of foam, Feeling like a water bubble; Perception is like a mirage, Volitions like a plantain trunk, And consciousness like an illusion, So explained the Kinsman of the Sun. “However one may ponder it. And carefully investigate it, It appears but hollow and void When one views it ...


4

"Does The Buddha (1) recognize the possibility of finding the truth for these questions, or (2) is it impossible to find the truth, or (3) is it detrimental for us to know the truth?" To be sure, we are talking about questions like "Did I exist in the past? Shall I exist in future? How shall I be in future?" etc. In context of Sabbasava-Sutta, these are ...


4

It's somewhat sloppy language... "stored up potency" doesn't really mean anything; it's a concept, the concept that certain experiences will somehow be related to other experiences. There is nothing in Theravada Buddhism, AFAIK, even hinting at karma being stored up, or of a continuum being imprinted. So, it should probably be understood as conventional ...


4

Admittedly, I'm a beginner myself. However, it is my understanding that the Buddha took no position as to the existence/non-existence of a God who created everything we see, on the grounds that there is no way of knowing - at least within this life - for certain whether such a being exists. Instead, the Buddha tried to re-focus people on what they could do ...


4

The first thing that the story (i.e. "not got a particular position she rightfully deserved due to a conspiracy") reminded me of was verse 3 of the Dhammapada (i.e. "he robbed me" etc.). "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred. "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered ...


4

Is Buddhism against scientific attitude? Is it against scientific research? Kalama Sutta embodies scientific thinking where nothing should be accepted due to various non scientific reasoning. The non rational reasons are: Do not go upon what has been acquired by repeated hearing (anussava), nor upon tradition (paramparā), nor upon rumor (itikirā), nor ...


4

The word ‘vijja’—translated here as clear knowing—also means ‘science.’ And just as science implies a method, there is a method—a discipline—underlying the knowledge that leads to Unbinding. If Dhamma equates to ‘vijja’, then the prevailing scientific attitude is ‘a-vijja’, as it leads to more binding. Unlike the Dhamma, the method, the discipline, and ...


4

In your daily life, as you go about things, just observe and analyse any negative thought arising in the mind without acting in response to them. One does not need a specific spot or time to do this. Whenever a negative thought arises in the mind, one has to observe and analyse it right away as a fire needs to be extinguished instantly. This way one is able ...


4

-- "why is it that in this life time I have became obsessively bent to attain nibbana" There is a traditional Buddhist teaching that explains this Awakening through a combination of lucky causes and conditions. When the conditions are unlucky, they are known as "Eight Conditions in Which There is No Freedom to Practice Dharma". When the conditions are lucky,...


4

SN 1.25 [Deva:] He who's an Arahant, his work achieved, Free from taints, in final body clad, That monk still might use such words as "I." Still perchance might say: "They call this mine." ... Would such a monk be prone to vain conceits? [The Blessed One:] Bonds are gone for him without conceits, All delusion's chains are cast aside: Truly ...


4

If there are any Buddhists who hold the view that no beings are reborn, they are certainly right in that there is no absolute thing as a being or self, as Bhikkhuni Vajira reaffirmed to Mara in SN 5.10: Why now do you assume 'a being'? Mara, have you grasped a view? This is a heap of sheer constructions: Here no being is found. Just as, with an ...


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