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10

(UPDATED) After some digging, it seems that indeed there is no one standard that can be truly relied upon to work for all version of the tipitaka, at least for the Samyutta and the Anguttara. For the Digha and the Majjhima, it's pretty simple to say DN 22 or MN 10, and I think the order and numbering is pretty consistent across the board. And no, ...


9

The Pāli Canon (Pali: Tipitaka) is the standard collection of scriptures in the Theravada Buddhist tradition, as preserved in the Pāli language. It is the most complete extant early Buddhist canon. It was composed in North India, and preserved orally until it was committed to writing during the Fourth Buddhist Council in Sri Lanka in 29 BCE, approximately ...


9

To straighten view before meditation: Samma,ditthi Sutta Anapana Anapanasati Sutta Satipatthana Satipatthana Sutta and Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta Kayagatasati Sutta Saṅkhitta Dhamma Sutta Elements / properties Dhātu Vibhaṅga Sutta Titth’ayatana Sutta Maha Hatthi,padapama Sutta Bahu Dhātuka Sutta Reflective / perception based Giri-m-ananda Sutta Indriya ...


9

If the Buddha said that we shouldn't take his teachings as dogma, but rather try to experience for ourselves what realization is--why should we study the scriptures? First, one should study the scriptures so one is not caught on hearsay of what the Buddha might have taught. Moreover, how can one expect to learn the teachings of the Buddha while at the same ...


9

There is a large body of texts of discourses of the Buddha touching on lay life issues. Below, I paste a (probably not exhaustive) list of suttas compiled by a user from dhammalwheel forum. There's also an upcoming book from Bhikkhu Bodhi presenting a collection of suttas of discourses of the Buddha dealing with lay life themes: The Buddha's Teachings on ...


8

The oldest existing manuscript clearly identified as Mahāyāna is a birch bark manuscript of the Aṣṭasāhasrikā-prajñāpāramitā-sutra or Discourse on Perfect Wisdom consisting of 8000 [Lines]. This manuscript was carbon dated to 47~147 CE. A version of this text was translated into Chinese in 179 CE by Lokakṣema and was amongst the first few Buddhist texts ...


8

During the beginning of the 4th century CE, Buddhist scholars began composing a new series of Sūtras with the purpose of synthesizing and organizing concepts from earlier Mahāyāna Sūtras, a task which the authors viewed as the third turning of the wheel of Dharma. Three Sūtras from this period left a major impact on the intellectual endeavor of Mahāyāna ...


8

Depression is not just a state of mind, it is also a chemical imbalance. And for various reasons (maybe genetical or other) this chemical imbalance will affect some peoples more than others. Therefore we should be careful not to respond by simply pointing logical and scholar facts and reasons that one "should not" be depressive. Having said that, there is ...


8

First a couple of comments... It is to be expected that in a non-Buddhist country you wouldn't find as much authentic Buddhist literature as you would in Buddhist countries. In Thailand, for example, it is quite easy to obtain a full translation of the entire tipitaka... two different translations, actually. Of course, the fact that the tipitaka is tens of ...


8

This question is addressed in the Abhaya Sutta from the Buddha himself, on the topic of Right Speech. Your question should fall under "In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, but unendearing & disagreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them." (Abhaya Sutta). From your same link on the ...


8

There's an article in English titled Anicca Vata Sankhara in which Bhikkhu Bodhi describes the various meanings of the word. Here are very brief extracts from that article, a summary: The word sankhara is derived from the prefix sam, meaning "together," joined to the noun kara, "doing, making." The suttas distinguish the sankharas active in ...


8

The mind occurs in both passive and active modes. The passive gives way to the active when a stimulus is received through one of the sense doors. The passive state of mind is called bhava"nga, cuti, or paa.tisandhi, according to the occasion. Bhava"nga. The bhava"nga citta, mentioned earlier, is the primary form of mind. It flows from conception ...


8

What are the proper relax / Sleep practices for a practitioner of meditation methods? If you do Metta meditation before sleeping you are better off, as one benefit of Metta is you sleep well. ((Aṭṭha) Mettânisansa Sutta, (Ekā,dasa) Mettânisansa Sutta) As to Buddhist point of view what is sleep and how to cope with it? This is when your Bhavanga is ...


8

Oh, this is easy. This one I was taught many many times. Here is how it goes: Regular untrained people live their life as if they will live forever. They 1) worry about small unimportant stuff, get offended, or scared, or enraged at things that are not really important. And 2) they waste days, months and years of life waiting for better life. However, 1) ...


8

The way my first teacher explained karma, it works like a matching machine, it just puts the "victim" in the situation when the odds of encountering a certain kind of people are increased. It's like, the victim's bad karma makes them more vulnerable to corresponding problems. But the actions of the "aggressor" are their own choice plus their own past karma. ...


7

I practice with the Triratna Buddhists which is an explicit attempt to bring Buddhism into the Western context. It is ecumenical so brings in all traditions so for me this question is very interesting. For us the sutras that are particularly studied are Pali Canon Middle Length Discourses generally but more specifically from the pali canon Satipatthana ...


7

In AN 4.67, the Buddha allowed the monks to use the paritta to protect themselves from harm. Notice Ven. Thanissaro's note: "This is one of the few protective charms mentioned in the Pali canon and specifically allowed by the Buddha for monks to use (another charm, also allowed to the monks, is contained in DN 32). Note that the power of the charm is said ...


7

From the Anapanasati Sutta "Mindfulness of in-&-out breathing, when developed & pursued, is of great fruit, of great benefit. Mindfulness of in-&-out breathing, when developed & pursued, brings the four frames of reference to their culmination. The four frames of reference, when developed & pursued, bring the seven factors for ...


7

Each Sutta was intended for a specific audience to address a specific issue. This is one of the reasons why there was a need for an Abhidhamma that consolidated the messages from all of the Suttas into a overarching framework. You are absolutely correct that each Nikāya has a different "character". The Dīgha Nikāya tends to include a lot of mythological ...


7

Abhisankhāra-māra - The Karmic force Kleśa-māra, or Ma̋ra as the embodiment of all unskillful emotions. Mṛtyu-māra, or Māra as death, in the sense of the ceaseless round of birth and death. Skandha-māra, or Māra as metaphor for the entirety of conditioned existence. Devaputra-māra, or Māra the son of a deva (god), that is, Māra as an ...


7

A couple of dictionary translations: Bhagavā: venerable, fortunate, blessed, sublime. Generally designates the Buddha. Bhagavant (adj. n.) [cp. Vedic bhagavant, fr. bhaga] fortunate, illustrious, sublime, as Ep. and title "Lord." Thus applied to the Buddha (amhākaŋ Bh.) and his predecessors. Occurs with extreme frequency; of fanciful exegetic explns of ...


7

From the Ajañña Sutta (AN 8.13): "In the same way, a monk endowed with eight qualities is worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, an incomparable field of merit for the world. Which eight? (1) "There is the case where a monk is virtuous. He dwells restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate ...


7

OP: Is it right from a Buddhist point of view to say that you and me are the same because there is only one consciousness playing different minds (egos, personalities, psychologies, etc) and bodies of all sentient creatures at the same time. Eg. "the same driver driving all the cars at the same time in present, past and future" No. That's a classic ...


7

I am not sure but i think it is something like this from MN 43: "The immeasurable awareness-release, the nothingness awareness-release, the emptiness awareness-release, the theme-less-awareness-release: There is a way of explanation by which these qualities are different in meaning & different in name, and there is a way of explanation by which ...


6

The clearest example of this that I can think of is in the Mahaparinibbana Sutta (DN 16) where the Buddha was asked (obliquely) by the brahman Vassakara on behalf of King Ajatasattu whether he had a chance at killing off an enemy nation. The Buddha replied with the seven "Conditions of a Nation's Welfare": At that time the Venerable Ananda was standing ...


6

According to Chogyam Trungpa, loneliness is the heart of Sila, Buddhist discipline. As such, the spirit of loneliness must permeate one's practice, whether one is ordained or not. Critically important at "hinayana-level", loneliness temporarily steps aside for the Mahayana phase, only to return with Vajrayana, this time to stay. Loneliness begins with ...


6

Now, there are two destinations for a person with wrong view, I tell you: either hell or the animal womb. I think the Buddha was referring to People with Wrong View. Which in this particular story happened to be an actor.But could be anybody from different kind of professions. On the other hand when you come to think of it this profession requires someone ...


6

Thanissaro's translations are... unique. The word being used, as others have pointed out, is "mano", the leader of an irregular group of nouns called the "manogana" - "the group with mano as its leader". The PED has a huge article on mano, worth reading in full if you're interested. I've copied the gist of it below, but as you should see, it is probably ...


6

From a more secular perspective the Pail Canon has the definite merit of being closer to the time of the Buddha so could (controversially?) be argued has the greatest authenticity. However there is an enormous canon of Mahayana literature that from a historic point of view was written hundreds of years after the time of the Historical Buddha. To the ...


6

I think the Sangaha Sutta would be helpful here, It gives the following as the basis for the bonds of fellowship Generosity, kind words, beneficial help, & consistency in the face of events, Also the Sigalovada Sutta has a lot of advice concerning ones social relationships. Advice is given to 6 groups corresponding to the six directions of ...


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