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38

The Mahayana perspective on social and ecological ethics is based on the high ideals of symbiosis, harmony, and cooperation. In the old times there were wandering monks who did not work and lived on alms - in return they shared the nectar of Dharma. They were no parasites. And if some of them were, Buddha encouraged the householders to be selective in ...


34

No, it does not. In order to steal, something has to be misappropriated from the original owner. Copying is not theft, even according to modern jurisprudence; copyright is an artificial "right" granted to the "owner" of a specific intellectual activity to prevent the "copying" of the product of said intellectual activity. "Intellectual property" is likewise ...


28

I have worked with homeless persons through non-profit agencies for over twenty years, therefore my answer is based on much experience. You are wise to seek the compassionate response. There is tremendous judgement about people who beg: assumptions are made that they are addicts, or unwilling to work (prefer to beg), or uninformed about available social ...


26

In order to understand this issue, we have to understand morality according to Buddhism. In Theravada Buddhism, morality is completely based on the effect that an act has on the mind of the actor. Hence, eating meat need not be karmically negative, yet killing Hitler to "save" others from suffering need be, since it requires defilement to take the life of ...


24

In the Theravada tradition, there's no justification for killing. But justification is a personal thing. Buddhism tells you about the consequences of an action. Not whether it is justified or not. Killing intentionally is always bad Karma, whether you, the society, a religious community, a religious book, judges of courts, a god, inner voice, patriotism, ...


21

Dakkhina Vibhanga Sutta is the one you want to have a look at. Ananda, there are these fourteen individual gifts (cuddasa pāṭipuggalikā dakkhi). What are the fourteen? One gives a gift to the Tathagata, the arhat [worthy one], fully self-awakened one—this is the first individual gift One gives a gift to a pratyeka Buddha—this is the second ...


19

Causes of False Speech The root causes of false speech are greed, hatred and delusion. Greed is the root cause when false speech is used to obtain material gain or status for oneself or someone dear to oneself. Hatred is the root cause when false speech is used to cause loss and bring harm and suffering to others. Delusion is the root cause when it is ...


18

"Without wisdom, effort, restraint of the senses, without giving up everything, I see no well-being for beings." -- The Buddha (SN 2.17) You can't have your cake and eat it too, unfortunately. The truth is the truth whether it is convenient or not. In this case, there are some fairly important truths that you have to consider when trying to decide what ...


17

What does Buddhism say about polyamory? Buddhism is not conserned with the title of the romantic relationship or the sexual orientation of the partners in it. Buddhism goes much deeper than that, it looks instead at the defilements that are connected with romantic relationships, e.g. "lust, craving, desire, jealousy, hatred etc." Is it any different ...


15

Honestly I would say that it's not even a grey area. For me, investing in stocks in the meat industry is not in keeping with right livelihood. To quote the Vanijja Sutta in full "Monks, a lay follower should not engage in five types of business. Which five? Business in weapons, business in human beings, business in meat, business in intoxicants, and ...


14

The five precepts are an absolute entry-level teaching that is designed to help the practitioner master basic discipline of self-control and self-reflection. Abstaining from killing, stealing etc. implies basic ability to watch one's mind for harmful thoughts and emotions, and to prevent them from getting acted out. In light of the above, the no-killing ...


14

If someone is attacking you to kill you should you defend yourself? ... I think yes, you may. Our religion has never stopped us from doing that. Would it be ethical to kill an intruder coming into your home? you may stop an intruder forcefully. Our religion has never stopped us from doing that. But for me, being Buddhist, the answer will not end ...


14

Theravada and Vajrayana Buddhists (Tibetan, SE Asian) and Japanese Mahayana Buddhists are not vegetarian. So if you don't want to be a vegetarian, there are plenty of traditions that don't bother with this rule. And as for rules, there are plenty of traditions that de-emphasize rules altogether. So that leaves East Asian Buddhism. The traditional arguments ...


14

From Mahayana perspective, illegally downloading e.g. a movie is definitely a breach of precepts, for three reasons: because this entails acting out of desire for pleasure, because this upsets, not gladdens, the minds of whoever conceive themselves as the owners, and because this involves the parasitic attitude of getting something for nothing. Firstly, ...


11

The issue is mostly between you & your fiancé (rather than the guy) since it is your fiancé that must establish appropriate boundaries with the guy. If he is to remain your friend, naturally he should apologise to both of you. If he remains your friend, you must communicate your personal concerns directly to him (rather than hold them within you). ...


11

Sure! It is allowed for lay people, as long as they observe the five precepts and virtue (sila), which includes Right Livelihood (samma ajivo). Please also see this answer. The Vanijja Sutta states: "Monks, a lay follower should not engage in five types of business. Which five? Business in weapons, business in human beings, business in meat, business ...


10

It's not justifiable even if the killing is for self or others protection. If killing of an animal fulfills below five conditions it will give bad results (akusla karma vipaka) There should be a living being Knowing that its a living being Intention of killing Act to kill Animal is killed by the act Note: Even If someone kills an animal which is ...


10

There are many different views on the 5th precept. I'll sum up the 3 main views that I've encountered most: 1. Theravada In this article Bikkhu Bodhi explains that The taking of intoxicants is defined as the volition leading to the bodily act of ingesting distilled or fermented intoxicants.[10] It can be committed only by one's own person (not by ...


10

There are places in the older texts that one can find passages advocating violence. For example the Tibetan Kalachakra Tantra has got anti-Islamic passages in it which can be used as a justification for violence The Chakravartin shall come out at the end of the age, from the city the gods fashioned on Mount Kailasa. He shall smite the barbarians in ...


10

I would like to answer this not from the perspective of a knowledgeable Buddhist, but from the perspective of someone who has been clean and sober for over 9 years. Disclaimer: I am a recent Buddhist and know very little about the mechanics or the theory of it all. I simply practice daily meditation with the intent of awakening someday in this lifetime (or ...


10

You could choose to say the following: "Yes i know which direction the rabbit went. I do however choose not to share that information since it will probably lead to the killing of the animal and the creation of unwholesome kamma for you (hunter)". This way you are honest but choose not to give the information because you know what might happen. This way ...


10

In general, in Buddhism taking without asking would still be considered unskilful. The relevant precept is adinnādānā veramaṇī sikkhāpadaṃ samādiyāmi "I undertake the training principle of not taking the not given". There is nothing to stop someone asking for food if they are hungry. Indeed by stealing one also deprives the other of the opportunity of ...


10

he didn't prohibit it for secular people, it's not even subsumed under sexual misconduct but since it's a lustful urge and act it is unwholesome and unskillful, and those need to be handled using the Right effort [i]"There is the case where a monk generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the sake of the non-...


9

I don't think there is a definite answer to this question. Bear in mind that Buddha did not give any commandments in form of 'do' and 'do not'. He rather gave guidelines and various methods that are suited for various types of people. The fact that one style goes against your preferences, does not mean that someone else cannot benefit from that. To practise ...


9

Yes. Buddhists can and sometimes even should defend themselves and people around them. However, consider the following: If you do it out of anger, you will suffer from the results of this anger. The key is to use violence without any negative feelings but out of active compassion (see the next point) If you are aware that the attacker wants to kill not only ...


9

I've been to a lecture in which a Tibetan Buddhist monk (specifically, a nyingmapa) was asked the same question by a teenage girl. Basically, his answer was, such killing would both end some existing suffering and create some new suffering. Because regular person does not see all complexity of karma network spanning multiple lives, his or her acts are very ...


9

Because buddhist morality is not about regulations and punishments for bad deeds. It's about the effect actions have on your well being, and others' well being. It's "medicinal morality", rather than "legalist morality". And what is bad for the mind's health is to act with malicious intentions. This perspective on morality is completely different from our ...


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