38

In the (translated into English) Pali text that I have, there's a section titled "The Admission of Women to the Order" within a chapter titled "Stability of Societies". This section describes Ananda's asking the Buddha whether Maha-Pajapati could join the order. When Ananda asks for the third time, he asks, "Lord, are women capable, after going forth ...


23

The quote comes from Kalama Sutra (AN 3.65) and is often taken out of context, hence misunderstood. People of Kalama found themselves bombarded by tens of spiritual teachers, each claiming authority and expertise in spiritual matters. These teachers' doctrines were rather different from each other, but each was presented as The truth. Each teacher seemed ...


21

I've searched the Internet, and found a website claiming that the quotation in question is a bad translation of a fragment from Kalama Sutta which in original goes: “Now, Kalamas, don’t go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the ...


20

This reminds me of a Zen story. A North-American female student approaches her Zen master and asks: "Is it true that a woman can never become a Buddha?" Zen master says "yup". The student gets into a long rant about women discrimination, equal rights, and how deluded the Zen master must be in his culturally-inherited biases. Zen master waits until she runs ...


16

Can the Buddha never be a woman? If it is true, why can't they? According to MN 115, a woman cannot be a Buddha and, as far as I know, the reason is not explained anywhere in the canon. He understands: ‘It is impossible, it cannot happen that a woman could be an Accomplished One, a Fully Enlightened One ― there is no such possibility.’ And he ...


12

Here is the story you refer to http://www.yellowrobe.com/practice/general/247-money-rules-for-buddhist-monks-and-nuns-by-dhamminda-bhikkhu.html It is taught that even a layperson who is an anagami (non-returner) keeps the ten precepts naturally and does not accept or use money. For example the anagami Ghatikara was without gems, gold, silver, or ...


12

Am I right in thinking that the Dhammacakkappavattana is the first and most important sutta? I wouldn't say most important but, taking into account other discourses, it seems it was the first discourse expounded by the Buddha. If so, is it sensible that, there, it is "SN 56.11" (i.e. not the first sutta)? It depends on how you'd want to organize the ...


12

1.One of the ways to deal with anxiety,insecurity or lack of self confidence is by developing Sila (Morality,Integrity,Virtue,Ethics). "Five blessings, householders, accrue to the righteous person through his practice of virtue: great increase of wealth through his diligence; a favorable reputation; a confident deportment, without timidity, in every society,...


12

The Buddha likely spoke in several dialects that were quite similar to Pali. He was immensely well traveled for his time, so in his travels he likely adopted the native dialect to be better understood by the locals. His words were only a small part of his teaching - his enlightened presence and conduct were likely better vessels of his teaching. The Pali ...


12

The short answer is no, and no. The Pāḷi Canon is a translation. Although people in Central Ganges Valley all spoke closely related dialects at the time we think the Buddha lived. The problem of having different words for things was noted at least once in a Pāli text. In MN iii.234 (Araṇavibhanga Sutta) that there can be many local words for the same object, ...


11

I personally use the following translations: Paper copies of Bhikkhu Bodhi's translations of Nikayas (for example Majjhima) for nice smooth English rendition. Access To Insight for quick and convenient search. Dharmafarer for in-depth analysis. When in doubt, I do my own translation with a dictionary (Sanskrit, Pali, I also use a number of Pali-Russian ...


10

CORELESSNESS Before we can pick a translation we must understand what it is that we are translating. Prefix an- is a simple negation. Hindu concept of Atman should not be confused with Aham (the simple reflexive "I", "ego" or "self") nor with Jiva (the vitality that makes an animate being an animate being). Atman means "inner spirit" or "core" and refers ...


10

Thanks @soulsings for pointing me in the right direction; since I was looking for the Pali reference, here's the passage from the Ghatikara Sutta (MN 81): “Then he said: ‘Venerable sir, have you a better supporter than I am?’—‘I have, great king. There is a market town called Vebhalinga where a potter named Ghaṭīkāra lives. He is my supporter, my chief ...


10

(UPDATED) After some digging, it seems that indeed there is no one standard that can be truly relied upon to work for all version of the tipitaka, at least for the Samyutta and the Anguttara. For the Digha and the Majjhima, it's pretty simple to say DN 22 or MN 10, and I think the order and numbering is pretty consistent across the board. And no, ...


10

SN 42.3 (To Yodhajiva The Warrior) and SN 42.2 (To Talaputa the Actor) both contain the phrase, "Enough, headman, put that aside. Don't ask me that." The reason why he says "enough" seems to be that he doesn't want to have to tell them that they'll be reborn in hell or the animal realm. The sutta to the Warrior includes a warning against wrong view; and ...


9

This is actually a mistranslation of the verse; Buddhist Legends by Burlingame is a bit better: The Buddha, unlimited in power, the trackless. By what track can you lead him? In order to understand this verse, it might help to see the context; the Buddha is using poetry and imagery. Here's the Pali leading up to the verses in the commentary (it's about ...


9

What are the different interpretations and translations and what might be the most correct interpretation according to the different lines of practice? How are they rationalized? Here are some: Etymology: pari- is a prefix used with the connotation of around, about, all over, or that of completeness. Thus dhāvati means 'to run' and paridhāvati ...


9

Learning Pali is indeed beneficial if you have a inclination to be a scholar or to teach. If it is your salvation you are after you are better off spending time practicing. But to teach others the bar is much higher than practicing on your own. This is also a worthy cause.


9

I've heard Ajahn Brahm tell this story during a lecture which was recorded on YouTube, so I can confirm it's definitely told by him; however I don't remember which one it was. The story is not (strictly) in the suttas. It is probably (very loosely) based on AN 6.42, and deals more with the disturbances of nearby lay life as opposed to the wilderness. ...


9

Bhikkhu Bodhi has published an analogy of the Pali Canon called In the Buddha's Words which is arranged thematically. I found a very useful entry into the Pali Canon generally. The themes (and chapter headings) are The Human Condition The Bringer of Light Approaching the Dharma The Happiness Visible in the Present Lives The Way to a Fortunate Rebirth ...


8

According to the early texts the Buddha didn't have any secret teachings. Somewhere in the Digha Nikaya (I think it's in the Mahaparinibbana Sutta, but it's a very long Sutta and I can't quite locate it) the Buddha said: "I do not have the closed fist of the teacher who holds anything back" and in AN 1.283 the Buddha said: "Three things shine openly, not in ...


8

You could say the Buddha and arahants had a peculiar form of humour, as Konrad suggested in his comment above. The hasituppādacitta (smiling-producing mind) is a citta unique to enlightened beings. While they can also smile due to beautiful-functional cittas, the hasituppādacitta is rootless, containing none of the wholesome or unwholesome roots. This ...


8

Does the Theravada canon have such ideas anywhere at all? This is a far-fetched example which barely answer your question but IMO the Buddha himself kind of returned to the market-place: not as a tradesman nor even a customer, but he did leave his solitude. The description could almost fit him: In the World Barefooted and naked of breast, I ...


8

It did not. The Canon is an integral part of Mahayana, has always been. In Chinese Mahayana, the Canon is included in the form of Agamas (translated to Chinese). In Tibetan Mahayana, the Canon is a part of Kangyur (translated from Chinese or Sanskrit to Tibetan). Most of those are the same sutras as in Pali, just with slightly different wording. Some are ...


8

I encourage you to read the following: Bhikkhu Sujato & Bhikkhu Brahmali. The Authenticity of the Early Buddhist Texts. In this work, their project is to investigate the question of authencity systematically. In that, the approach is quiet academic and might be to your liking. Page 7, they state a feature of the early Buddhist texts: The Buddha’s ...


8

There's an article in English titled Anicca Vata Sankhara in which Bhikkhu Bodhi describes the various meanings of the word. Here are very brief extracts from that article, a summary: The word sankhara is derived from the prefix sam, meaning "together," joined to the noun kara, "doing, making." The suttas distinguish the sankharas active in ...


8

The Buddha not only stressed the importance of right speech but also the right time and occassion to say it: "So too, prince, such speech as the Tath›gata knows to be untrue, incorrect, and unbeneficial, and which is also unwelcome and disagreeable to others: such speech the Tath›gata does not utter. Such speech as the Tath›gata knows to be true and ...


7

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahmavihara the Four Noble Abodes are: Loving-kindness (Pāli: mettā, Sanskrit: maitrī) towards all: the hope that a person will be well; "the wish that all sentient beings, without any exception, be happy." Compassion (Pāli and Sanskrit: karuṇā): the hope that a person's sufferings will diminish; "the wish ...


7

Traditionally the original source of the teachings is Ananda. Ananda was the Buddha's cousin and primary attendant during a lot of his life up to the Buddha's death. Being so close to the Buddha, he heard at first hand the Buddha's teaching and was able to commit them to memory. Shortly after the Buddha's death the First Council was convened and Ananda was ...


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