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No. Lord Buddha always encourages and praises those who strives aiming to eliminate all traces of unvirtuous action from their conduct and bring to consummation the virtuous actions. “And what, monks, is right effort? (i) There is the case where a monk generates desire, endeavors, activates persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the sake of the ...


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It's extremely difficult to let go of sensual enjoyment. Experiencing sensual enjoyment leads to clinging, meaning trying to experience even more sensual enjoyment. Hence, the masses have the natural tendency towards burning with sensual fever, rather than trying to escape it. It's a vicious cycle. From Magandiya Sutta: "Now suppose that there was a ...


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Instinct (refer to AN 7.11). The Earth today has 7.7 billion people plus zillions of animals, insects, fish & other life forms. This whole Earth is created by lust & craving (refer to SN 12.44). Basically, each creature is born from reproduction for the purpose to further engage in reproduction. It goes on & on like this, endlessly for the ...


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In Vajrayana school as presented by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche there's a prominent line of teaching about so called "spiritual materialism". SM is when we use spirituality as a way to accumulate the imaginary dharmic wealth and use it to pump up one's ego. SM is not as much about what you do on the outside as it is about your hidden attitude and ...


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I think that Buddhism might see "virtuous" as "absence of sin" -- certainly monks' lives, for example, seem to me to emphasise avoiding various forms of harmful or potentially harmful behaviour. And it isn't necessary to balance not-doing-harm with doing-harm. A reason for not doing harm (or for behaving virtuously, for being kind) is to ...


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The monastic rules of the Vinaya has rules pertaining to food, lodging, medicine, conduct etc. There are rules pertaining to medical care. The Buddha ate, slept, wore robes, took medicine when he was ill etc. The Middle Way of the Buddha avoids both extreme indulgence and extreme asceticism. It includes moderation in food, healthcare and living. To neglect ...


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What you are describing is colloquially known as being in the zone. It's a type of refined concentration where spectacular human feats can be achieved. There's a lack of ownership regarding the current task and often the concept of a body disappears. This should make you curious. It's completely possible for jhana to occur under these circumstances, off the ...


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Let's think for a moment about the choice this question (apparently) leaves us with. Do we: align ourselves with the set of anxieties and angers that coalesce around conceptions of highly transmissible and overtly deadly diseases, or... align ourselves with the set of anxieties and angers that coalesce around conceptions of overbearing sociopolitical actors ...


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I've read that one shouldn't sacrifice one's own welfare for the welfare of others, no matter how great. Clearly know your own welfare and be intent on the highest good. It's from Dhammapada verse 166. This aside, consider the legal argument of forced vaccination precedent as it was argued in "Jacobson vs Massachusetts, 197 U.S. 11 (1905), wherein ...


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Both are fire, the goal is to abandon both good and evil. Below is a quote from Theory and Reality by Luang Pu Chah So the Buddha examined the causes and conditions underlying existence and rebirth. As long as he had not yet fully penetrated the matter and understood the truth, he continued to probe deeper and deeper with a peaceful mind, reflecting on how ...


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The end point of practice is liberty: not the commonly-heard but overly simplistic notion pf political liberty, but the essential principle that underpins that concept. Unfortunately, this sense of metaphysical liberty can be deeply unnerving (heck, even political liberty can be unnerving). People like limits and boundaries, whether to hide behind or push up ...


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To add to other answers, drawing more from Darwin's theory of the evolution : take 2 people, one for which the forces that propel towards Nibbana are stronger, and the other for which craving for sensual enjoyment is stronger. Which is the one that is gonna reproduce more ? Obviously the second one. He would be less happy than the first, but from an ...


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If we were completely separate from the world, completely independent - then the perfect focus on virtue would be easy. But we are not separate, not isolated. We are connected with people and events around us. We are part of the web of influences. These influence create context for our existence. Our desires and decisions come from this context. A lot of ...


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This sounds most like Nichiren Buddhism, which, being a pure land school, was able to acknowledge wrong doing and bad conduct by people that genuinely wanted enlightenment. Of course, certain sutras and traditions like zen talk about breaking the precepts and an absence of goodness. And the tantric tradition welcomes sex. But suggesting we balance good with ...


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The Buddha smiles many times in the suttas, in fond remembrance of experiences that brought great wisdom. MN83:2.1: Then the Buddha smiled at a certain spot. The Buddha does not smile at the suffering of others. His smiles are never cruel. His smiles are for the remembrance of great wisdom and insight that can be shared. The Buddha smiles for us all, never ...


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A little personal background: my mom is Filipino, and my dad is Sinhalese (he professes to be Buddhist but is verbally, physically, and psychologically abusive). My mom is not a Buddhist but her life insights have enriched my Dhamma practice. I see toxic people as bottles of poison or pesticide: you know they’re harmful if in contact with but you don’t have ...


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From a Buddhist perspective, how does one reconcile with the huge moral and ethical shortcomings that allow pharmaceutical companies to indemnify themselves from any Ill effects caused by vaccination? I agree with ruben2020's advice, but I want to add that I also like to follow doctor's orders -- i.e. it isn't only me, the government, and the pharmaceutical ...


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