11

The truth about the Buddha, as far as I can see, was that he was disinclined to do much of anything after his enlightenment: 'With great pains have I acquired it. Enough! why should I now proclaim it? This doctrine will not be easy to understand to beings that are lost in lust and hatred. 'Given to lust, surrounded with thick darkness, they will not ...


11

The issue is mostly between you & your fiancé (rather than the guy) since it is your fiancé that must establish appropriate boundaries with the guy. If he is to remain your friend, naturally he should apologise to both of you. If he remains your friend, you must communicate your personal concerns directly to him (rather than hold them within you). ...


11

This is an easy one. Stop looking at the media so much. The media is not reality. It's a small negatively skewed snippet of it. There is so much more to life than the perpetual negativity we see in the media. It's only in recent times that the media has become way more invasive. We now have 24/7 news cycles and people walk around addicted to and staring ...


10

Samsara can be quite brutal and there is suffering. The Buddha acknowledged this in the First Noble Truth. And his last words urged his disciples to strive on with diligence toward their enlightenment. Only through Nibbanna will one escape the suffering of Samsara. Nature is full of examples of suffering such as you detailed. The animals involved have no ...


8

Human belongs to a separate realm other than animal's according to Buddhism's realm classification (the 6 realms are: hell, afflicted spirit, animal, human, asura, and heavenly beings). It doesn't mean we're inherently more compassionate than the animals. It just means we possess much greater potential to either do a lot of evil or a lot of good. You won't ...


7

No, the Buddha did not wait for people to ask for help. Only at the beginning, after attaining the Buddhahood, he waited for the invitation of the Maha Brahma, to preach the Dhamma to the world. That is customary to all the Buddhas. The issue with making it a rule to wait for people to ask for help is that people rarely realize that they need help. Even ...


7

When one gains insight into how reality functions, i.e. the 3 signs of existence and one experiences how mental and physical phenomena are unsatisfactory and suffering then one gains a great deal of compassion for other beings. One realizes that all other beings in conditioned existence is "suffering" from the same illness and that the Buddhas medicine can ...


7

It depends on what you mean by wisdom. By wisdom, if you mean intelligence as well, it can be dangerous and cruel. ex: coming up with more effective ways to invade countries, deceive people to make more profit etc. But wisdom from a Buddhist perspective can be seen as two fold. Worldly wisdom: Wisdom that helps you live a successful family life, be an ...


7

Every worker has a duty to become proficient in & do their work. A proper leader must nurture this. Also, rude speech is improper in the workplace; just as rude speech is improper in Buddhism. In reality, the values in original Pali Buddhism perfectly fit a secular world. For example, if the Pali scriptures are read, it will not be found the Buddha ...


7

If you are looking for a Buddhist answer you will have to accept that the Buddhist approach largely involves changing how you view the situation rather than changing what the situation is. You haven't mentioned any techniques you tried for dealing with the situation so here are three Use metta meditation to develop compassion for your friend, your fiance, ...


6

The recent scholarship that Hanson is referring to is probably this, by Richard Gombrich, the eminent British academic scholar of Buddhism: Kindness and Compassion as means to Nirvana in Early Buddhism This abstract mentions other places where Gombrich explicated his thesis: Gotama Buddha taught that compassion can produce enlightenment. So Richard ...


6

Through the practice of insight hate is reduced, craving is reduced and the 4 Brahma Viharas develops as a result of those reduction, i.e Metta(loving kindness), Karuna (compassion), Mudita (joy in the joy of others) and Upekkha ( Equnamity). Now the far enemies of the 4 Brahma Viharas are: Metta - ill-will Karuna - cruelty Mudita - Envy Upekkha - Craving/...


6

Unfortunately (because it doesn't answer your question), I'd guess it's better to find "practical solutions to everyday suffering" that don't contradict Buddhism. When my father died, there's a couple of things people did for my mum which she appreciated (i.e. these are stories which she retold, of examples of how to help people who are grieving because she ...


6

I wouldn't say cruel, but I certainly would say cold. The path to enilghtenment is divided in 4 stages. Before reaching each stage there is a progression of the insight that is similar in structure in all of the stages, and culminates with the attainement of the next stage. A simplified description of this progression of insight is that it is divided in ...


6

Suffering is like the fertilizer for our spiritual growth. It is what drives people into religion and spirituality. If one is happy and content in life one sees no reason to change anything in ones life. If one experience pain and suffering one naturally wants to seek a solution. For a lot of people that means coming to religion or spirituality to find a ...


6

The Access to Insight website has a number of related translations and essays; Suttas How to ensure that you'll be with your spouse in future lives: AN 4.55 Spouses' duties to each other: DN 31 Essays "A Single Mind" (Fuang) A Happy Married Life: A Buddhist Perspective (Dhammananda) Nothing Higher to Live For (Nyanasobhano) Buddhism and Sex (Walshe) ...


6

In Buddhism, there are fundamental realizations that help you answer these kinds of questions via direct experience, especially the realization of non-self. There is in fact no "other" that does stepping on. There is in fact no "me" that is being stepped on. You are not just yourself. "You" are the whole universe (in a sense). Anyway, when you can realize ...


6

Literally, karuna means "to mourn", "to pity", "to lament" - but the Buddhist meaning is quite different. In Pali Canon karuna is one of the four brahmaviharas, practiced as an antidote against aversion towards people and society due to their shortcomings. Somewhere in the Canon I've read Buddha saying karuna is like what a good king should feel for his ...


6

The two contradict only to a "confused" (=normal) mind - in which "self" and "others" are two separate things. To the enlightened mind, what's good for one is good for the other, because they dependently-co-emerge. Even in a regular worldly sense, if you think about it, it's impossible to 100% neglect one and only care about the other. If you attempted to ...


6

If an enlightened mind sees that helping someone is beneficial to them, then would they do it even when the helped doesn't proactively ask? Yes. They would help without being asked, as the Buddha did. However, the Buddha did this relatively rarely and only to those he knew he could help. The difficult issue is actually knowing intervening when not asked ...


5

As a practicing Theravadin I've studied the Pali Suttas very seriously for the past six years and I've never found anything in them that indicates that compassion is sufficient for enlightenment. In fact the term compassion (Karuna in Pali) is used quite infrequently. The term Metta meaning loving-kindness or goodwill is much more common than the term ...


5

If you step back from this one life and look at the totality of Samsara then no being is better or worse than any other being. Samsara is so vast that any being that kills you in this life, is sure to have died for you in another life. A soldier kills his enemy but he most likely killed a enemy that was at one time his brother. If a being steps on ...


5

The practice of the Brahmaviharas is comprehensively dealt in Chapter IX of the Visuddhimagga. Online resource :- Visuddhimagga. Daniel Ingram says that the Brahmaviharas are: Loving-Kindness (Metta): the natural well-wishing for one's self and all beings. Compassion (Karuna): the natural wishing that the suffering of one's self and all beings will ...


5

Yes. Generosity, kind words and helpfulness are all meaningful to the Buddha, however small. From Vaccha Sutta: "I tell you, Vaccha, even if a person throws the rinsings of a bowl or a cup into a village pool or pond, thinking, 'May whatever animals live here feed on this,' that would be a source of merit, to say nothing of what is given to human ...


5

Since I am old, this happens with some frequency. A single wordless look with metta, eye-to-eye, is all that is needed. If a hug would be welcomed (and only if it would be welcomed), then it can be offered. Talk only when spoken to and respond briefly, simply and kindly. An offer to help is always appreciated, however. If the person is distant, the ...


4

I am going to try my reply, based on the assumption that by 'terrorists' you are referring to the recent events in Middle East, 'Sydney Siege', Charlie Hebdo and so forth. Personally I would take the following approach: Ensure my own 'safety' first By 'safety' I mean to ensure I do not lose my own Metta. Within the eternal tides of Samsara, the wellness ...


4

While I can relate to this somehow, it overlooks one striking and most basic fact of Buddhism: that justice is a law of nature. In contrast to Greek thought, this means, that the Greeks, since their concept of "the world" or "the universe" was rather empiro-scientific and unrelated to moral (=human) values, had to look for "human" justice or even "define" ...


4

Has anyone heard anything of this research or more broadly has anyone got any references where the Buddha really emphasizes compassion and indicates that compassion alone is enough? I have no knowledge about such research. I also can't recollect a reference from the early texts that points, even implicitly, in such direction. There's a reference pointing in ...


4

Buddhist view on Anatta is: There is no solid core as everything in the physical and metal structure is changing and not permanent There is noting that you can absolutely control Hence there is nothing worthy of identifying as oneself In contrary contemporary view was: There was some small internal part which persists between lives The 5 aggregates are ...


4

This is a very subtle matter and can easily be misunderstood, even with proper references. The doctrine of anatta, not self, does not state that nothing exists. It's just that the idea of what you think it exists is completely mistaken. So the idea has no correspondence in reality and it is in that sense that the self doesn't exist. And this selfless, ever ...


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