9

I hope SN 42.6 quoted below will give you comfort. A person's actions while they were alive determines their outcome, and not rituals performed after death. Then Asibandhaka’s son the chief went up to the Buddha, bowed, sat down to one side, and said to him: “Sir, there are western brahmins draped with moss who carry pitchers, immerse themselves ...


7

There once was a potter named Ghaṭīkāra, who was the chief supporter of Buddha Kassapa. He was a lay person, deeply devout, and was once asked why he did not go forth. MN81:11.2: ‘Dear Ghaṭīkāra, you have heard this teaching, so why don’t you go forth from the lay life to homelessness?’ His answer was simple: MN81:11.3: ‘Don’t you know, dear Jotipāla, ...


7

What you are noticing is a familiar behavioural pattern unearthed by various Buddhists practices. In Tibetan and Theravada Buddhism it is called Māna or to use the more user-friendly term: conceit. Theravada sees this as one of the very last fetters to fall away. Conceit can be quite a horrible one. I have experienced this myself and still do on the odd ...


6

Your question is quite interesting because it starts out with an openness regarding identity view. Awesome! You ask about what is and are puzzled at the rise of feelings pleasant, painful or neutral. You ask whether we have experimental evidence for such feelings and equations for them. Indeed, you might well be asking for the wave equation for "self" or "...


6

One of my friends asked me if I talk to her just out of compassion instead of out of real feelings of friendship. That question really freaked me out, especially because it seems to be pointing to some truth Indeed. Insightful or intuitive question by the lady One part of me wants to keep going along this Path, because all of the peace it has brought to ...


6

Along with all the excellent answers I would like to add a few cents of mine. A student asked Zen master Hakuin, What happens after we die? The Zen master replied, "I don't know." "But you're the master!" exclaimed the student. 'Yes,' said the Master, 'but I'm not a dead one.' The point is that you can never know what happens after death. The ...


5

"Self" is this highly childish, simplified, vague, unexamined idea in your mind: "This is me". It's not a concrete thing, it's an overall thing, it's a blob: "I am such, overall". It's an overgeneralization and an oversimplification. It exists exactly because it's unexamined, and because it exists it attracts all kinds of funny ideas. For example, you may ...


5

Good story. Maybe a bit too focused on your life (almost no mentions of other people) – but good nevertheless. My overall impression can be summarized with this allegory: Imagine, Mowgli always wanted to be a human, despite his upbringing as a wolf. After much struggle and hesitation, he accepts his own human-nature and gets up to walk on his two feet....


5

Part Three: The 16 Dealing with Teaching Dhamma 57. I will not teach Dhamma to a person with an umbrella in his hand who is not ill: a training to be observed. I will not teach Dhamma to a person with a staff in his hand who is not ill: a training to be observed. I will not teach Dhamma to a person with a knife in his hand who is not ill: a training to be ...


5

This is a typical (and common) stage in spiritual development. In my country, I mainly see it in a wide variety of Christians; it's common enough in Buddhist circles as well, but the Buddhist population is small by comparison. There are are a couple of things happening here that are worth considering when you run into such people: Such people are generally ...


5

In depersonalization and derealization disorders one recognizes a self that one is not, and that one believes one should be. This creates stress and anxiety, along with distortions of one's perception of reality. With anatta (no-self) one realizes that the egoic self is superficial, impermanent, and illusory, and loses one's attachment to it. This creates ...


4

It is difficult and challenging to be the target of danger, violence, hate, anger and abuse. These threats to self give rise to fear and dread, with a compulsion towards fight or flight as a solution to defend self. Is fight masculine? Let's say not. Is flight feminine? Let's say not. Is fight better than flight? Let's say not. Instead, let's take a look at ...


4

Another more precise and concise translation of the Diamond Sutra renders it differently, Chapter 29: “Subhuti, if someone said the thus-come comes, goes, sits, or reclines, this person doesn’t understand the meaning of what I taught. Why is that? What thus-come is, that is from nowhere comes nor anywhere goes, hence called the thus-come. I think you ...


4

When somebody wants to know and is receptive. For the most part if you consider the way the Buddha taught, you notice he’s usually only directly addressing the sangha without being asked. Otherwise people usually come to the Buddha with questions. I don’t recall any texts were the Buddha goes out and engages people who are not part of the sangha without ...


4

Remarkably, for every single question I would have asked the Buddha or the Sangha, I've always found an answer in the suttas. There are a lot of suttas, so searching them can be overwhelming. The internet provides many ways to search the suttas. For example, for Early Buddhist Texts, Suttacentral.net has a prolific search engine that returns a massive ...


3

Remark: This is not (yet?) a full answer, but more an extended comment. For one impression of how might a loving relation be revered see "A.IV. 55 Nakulapitá und Nakulamátá" ; although the couple is not called arahants they are mentioned as "top on lay disciples" (see "A I.24") "The foremost of my laymen ...(...) ... who are intimate is the ...


3

The way I understand the present physics teaching does not address the consciousness.


3

phenomenon that is happened to me.... When you experience most of the phenomenon you describe, some emotion (mental feeling) of physical sensation would have popped up. These are sometimes not readily apparent sometimes but if you practice insight meditation especially in the way taught by S.N.Goenka you will get sensitive enough to experience them. What ...


3

It happened that images are appearing and disappearing This is seeing. voices(may be a kind of I am talking or someone else) appearing and disappearing. This is hearing. Can someone explain me this phenomenon? All conditioned phenomenon that are subject to arising are also subject to cessation. You experienced Images that came and went, and voices ...


3

To me, thoughts appear as relationships or associations. When I think of something, I remember something else related to that, and then the next thing, or several next things. All these memories are at first very vague - more like feelings - and then if I give one of them attention, it becomes more specific. Now, if I look more carefully at a single thought -...


3

Well then, Lord, does not the Blessed One teach Dhamma in full[1] to some, but not so fully to others?" "I will reply to this question, headman, with another. Answer as seems proper to you. What do you think? Suppose a peasant farmer has three fields, one excellent, one middling, and one poor, sandy, salty, with bad soil. Tell me: when the farmer ...


3

These rituals exist for the living, not for the dead. They are designed to inspire very lazy, shameless people to try become better. In your case, looks like the medicine was too strong, for someone as sensitive as you. Relax and ignore it. Focus on basic principles: If you create harmony and peace, you and others will reap harmony and peace. If you create ...


3

I require that we treat our team members with compassion, refraining from false speech (teamwork, marketing and sales), and avoid taking what is not given (intellectual property, competition, finance). None of the above is uniquely Buddhist or even religious. Its just ordinary human ethics expected in any ethical workplace. There is no need to ever ...


3

The monastic rules of the Vinaya has rules pertaining to food, lodging, medicine, conduct etc. There are rules pertaining to medical care. The Buddha ate, slept, wore robes, took medicine when he was ill etc. The Middle Way of the Buddha avoids both extreme indulgence and extreme asceticism. It includes moderation in food, healthcare and living. To neglect ...


3

Let's think for a moment about the choice this question (apparently) leaves us with. Do we: align ourselves with the set of anxieties and angers that coalesce around conceptions of highly transmissible and overtly deadly diseases, or... align ourselves with the set of anxieties and angers that coalesce around conceptions of overbearing sociopolitical actors ...


3

This is not exactly "Buddhist scripture or commentary" but it's related -- What nurses need to know about Buddhist perspectives of end-of-life care -- here's an extract but you might read it all: Taking into consideration overall well-being (including the mental state of the patient), nurses must balance the level of pain relief needed against the ...


3

It's just an apparition of the mind and nothing particularly important. Things like this will arise from time to time. Like Max said in the comment, the mind subconsciously tries to entertain itself. This actually happens, like clockwork, at set times in a sit the first usually occurring right around the the 20-25 minute mark. This is where we really ...


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