7

Brilliant video, agreed. (The first 9 minutes are really great, then he gets distracted and starts rambling.) He answers your question right there in the video. He says, reifications are overcome by questioning them. Let me explain in my own words. Reifications is the substance the ego is made from. Since ego is a conglomerate of reifications, by overcoming ...


6

As Thrangu Rinpoche once said, some people spend a lot of time arguing whether a chair really exists or if it only exists in our minds, but here we are much more concerned with our attitude to the chair. Are we attached to this chair? Do we hate this chair? Do we think we are the chair? Are we free from this chair? That's what really matters in practice, not ...


6

My mother and I saw a cat today by the side of the road, which had probably been hit by a car. Its back legs were outstretched, it didn't walk, I guessed its lower back was broken. It miaowed to us. We went to find the owner of the nearby house, I told him that I had the regret to inform him that etc., he said that it sounded like his cat and we went to ...


5

First off, it’s a brilliant video. Normally, spiritual teachings don’t explain what meditation practices are doing, focusing instead on how to do them. That is, we engage in a practice, following instructions, with a goal in mind, which must, sooner or later, itself be let go of, but we never question how the meditation does its magic, nor even what—in ...


4

(1) a sutta in which the Buddha says, I believe, that one is able to perceive the beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful, along with other pairs that one can perceive in the way opposite to what is natural. I am not sure if there is Sutta which mentions this but the following does have something like what you mentioned above which is called the 5 ...


4

Buddhism teaches there are five aggregates. Consciousness (vinnana) is one aggregate; feeling (vedana) is another aggregate; perception (sanna) is another aggregate; and mental formations (sankhara) are another aggregrate. A 'conception' is a 'sankhara' ('mental formation') and is not a perception. 'Perception' is distinguishing differences in conscious ...


4

In my experience, it's a kind of phase. First, you don't really strive, but you're intrigued by Dharma enough to keep learning hodgepodge and practicing once in a while. Then your perception of samsara becomes negative enough that finding the way out becomes an urgent matter. This is the phase when you strive. Some people are more extreme than others and so ...


3

I think this is what you call Sankara. This is a very complex word with different meaning but you can learn about this in Abhidhamma. ========== Saṅkhārā is a collective term for the other fifty cetasikas. These fall into four groups: 1) Universal mental factors (sabba citta sādhāranā). 2) Particular mental factors (pakiṇṇakā). 3) Unwholesome mental ...


3

This is a very good question because the word "world" ("loka") appears to have many meanings; such as the "world of suffering" (SN 12.44; AN 4.45); the mundane world of defilements & samsara (Lokavagga; AN 8.6; SN 35.82) the world or realms of mental states (MN 79) and the world of people (AN 2.9; AN 3.23). One of the definitions of Nibbana is: "not this ...


3

In Buddhism, there are three types of kamma (action), namely: (i) bodily; (ii) verbal; and (iii) mental; each of which have results. Therefore, habitually merely visually observing pleasurable objects will making craving, addiction & the resultant restlessness grow. Thus, the Jesus teaching is similar to Buddhism; because viewing a woman with sexual ...


2

A relatively easy source on that is Unique Tenets of The Middle Way Consequence School, by Daniel Cozort. Better ones are Khedrup Je's Dose of Emptiness, and Shantideva's Bodhisattva Deeds. Vaïbashikas and Madhyamika-Prasangika do not assert self-knowers (self-cognizers). The other schools do. However, if Prasangika refute self-knowers, they do assert that ...


2

There is a famous quote in the ancient Hindu tradition, "what's day for the worldly is night for the sage" - meaning, the worldly and the spiritual people have the diametrically opposite sets of values, what's considered good by one is considered bad by the other: What everyone considers night is wakefulness for the renunciate, and that in which all are ...


2

1) What is the name of this chain? Is it distinct from the links of dependent origination? It is called 60 piyarūpaṃ-sātarūpaṃ in saccapabba of mahāsatipaṭṭhānasutta. It is a present part of dependent origination, nothing difference. 2) How can this chain and its parts best be explained? Contact = metting of a sense + a sense-organ + a sense-data. ...


2

We find the below and similar pairs in the Tikandika Sutta (A 5.144) “It is good, bhikshus, that one were to dwell from time to time perceiving the repulsive in the unrepulsive" In the Maha kamma vibhanga sutta we find the Buddha describing the complexities of kamma and to an extent admonishes from making categorical claims about the effects of kamma.


2

As you put it, this is one of the so-called 'unanswered questions', that is, you are really asking 'Does the world exist?' Such questions deal with opinions, points of view, diṭṭhi's; and there is no way of holding one side of such a controversy without opposing the opposite point of view; there is no way of resolving the conflict; and such a state does not ...


2

It's hard to talk about words, because some people assume a word has one precise meaning but then you realize that in the actual usage one word may often refer to several different things. "Perception" is one of such words. According to Google's dictionary, the ability to see, hear, or become aware of something through the senses. the state of ...


2

The body is obviously a perception (sense object) but it also exists independent of perception. For example, the automatic functions of the body (such as breathing, heart function, liver function, digestion function, growth, cell division, etc) exist and operate independent of perception. Therefore, scriptures, such as MN 43, say the living body continues to ...


2

For sutta references, reification can be understood as "name and form". SN22.28:1.2: “Mendicants, if there were no gratification in form, sentient beings wouldn’t love it. SN22.28:1.3: But since there is gratification in form, sentient beings do love it. SN22.28:1.4: If form had no drawback, sentient beings wouldn’t grow disillusioned with it. ...


2

The Buddha calls the process of reification "papañca" and points it out as the source of all conflicts in the world both internal and external which is a really profound yet difficult point for us to reflect on. I would recommend The Ball of Honey Sutta MN 18 and the introduction to it by Thanissaro Bikkhu where he expands on the process of papañca ...


1

If I can just talk about the English-language words ... "Perceive" comes from a Latin root which means: "per" -- wholly, thoroughly, entirely "capere" -- to take, to grasp So "perceive" means "take entirely" or "grasp all there is of it". In English it's used metaphorically (i.e. you perceive something mentally), in French it's usually used literally (e....


1

Perhaps if you search this site for "What is perception?" and "What is a view?" you will answer your question in two steps. To summarize very briefly, in my understanding, Perception is what happens when (for example) you look at some visual features and from them recognize the whole object, then you take the more abstract features of the object and ...


1

Perception is making memory. Everytime we are making memory. One is touching (construction), feeling (feeling), and making memory (perception), while seeing (consciousness) a color at same moment. Perception must arises everytime, except asannasatta-brahma and sannavedayitanirodhasamapatti, with a wholesome aggregate, unwholesome and neither wholesome nor ...


1

According to the Khajjaniya Sutta, sañña is perception "because it perceives yellow... blue... red... white". So, it seems that it allows the mind to give a concept or label to whatever it's contacting and feeling. Is perception giving a concept or label? Or is it more primitively discerning differences between shapes, colors, contrast, etc? In ...


1

In paticcasamuppada, shouldn't sañña precede tanha, instead of vedana? It should and it does: vedana => sañña => vitakka => papanca. From Madhupindika Sutta (MN 18): With contact as a requisite condition, there is feeling (vedana). What one feels, one perceives (sañña). What one perceives, one thinks (vitakka) about. What one thinks about, one ...


1

Vedana and Sanna are conjoined not disjoint. When it says Vedan it implies there is Sanna as well. ============= "Feeling, perception, & consciousness, friend: Are these qualities conjoined or disjoined? Is it possible, having separated them one from another, to delineate the difference among them?" "Feeling, perception, & consciousness are ...


1

Defilements or misperceptions do not arise because of correct insight attainment. There might be some left. Maybe defiled insights, or "Gecko - Samadhi [vipassanupakkilesa]" ...To practice concentration without correct understanding may lead to wrong concentration, from which the person develops abnormal perceptions, the so-called vipassanupakkilesa... ...


1

Identity view (i.e., "I am...") is the first lower fetter. the mendicants who, with the ending of three fetters are stream-enterers To say "I am the watcher" simply perpetuates identity view. Identity view is a conceptual tool. Like all tools, it can be put aside. When identity view is put aside, "there is watching." With identity view, there is a ...


1

In the Girimananda Sutta, there are nine perceptions (sanna) preliminary to the development of direct seeing of Anapanasati. The explanatory Pali word is 'paṭisañcikkhati', which means 'to think over', as follows: Idhānanda bhikkhu araññagato vā rukkhamūlagato vā suññāgāragato vā iti paṭisaṃcikkhati: There is the case where a monk — having gone to ...


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