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16

The Theravada tradition recognizes forty meditation types for obtaining at least access concentration, found scattered throughout the Tipitaka and organized in the commentaries, as follows: 1-10: The Kasinas These all lead to the four jhānas; they are practiced by creating a disk and focusing on it, while repeating, e.g., "earth, earth..." 1. Earth 2. ...


14

The debate centres around the Theravada commentarial interpretation of the suttas along with the teachings in the Abhidhamma, Patisambhidamagga, and Visuddhimagga. Basically, there are two schools of thought, one which subscribes to the above teachings and one that rejects them. The teachings in question are those that describe two potential paths: ...


8

Worrying about whether something is polite or not is a hindrance. I am sure some practitioners would find it offensive but if they are offended that probably tells you all you need to know. If you have yet to obtain the Jhanas then there are probably others who are still more advanced than you who have not yet obtained them either. The way I see it, anyone ...


7

The Suttas usually define Samma-Samadhi as the four jhanas, but in some Suttas it gives a different explanation. For example, in the Mahacattarisa Sutta the Buddha said: The Blessed One said: "Now what, monks, is noble right concentration with its supports & requisite conditions? Any singleness of mind equipped with these seven factors — right ...


7

Great question, you hit the nail on the head with this question. The goal of Buddhist path is liberation of mind. Liberation of mind is cessation of grasping and attachment. Cessation of grasping and attachment is letting go. So when you meditate, you look at your mind, you see grasping and attachment (it is easy to detect because it always creates dukkha, ...


6

"Jhana is like a meditative absorption state? I've come across this term." "[Jhanas are] distinctive meditative states of high concentration in which the mind becomes unified. [...] Jhana is often referred to as an absorption state, since the mind in Jhana is so deeply concentrated that it 'absorbs' into the meditation object." Richard Sankman, The ...


6

It depends on how you understand the first and second jhanas. If, like me, you take them as glorified descriptions of being able to get yourself in a joyful mood deliberately, then there are bunch of methods. first, as Buddha himself suggested, by thinking through good discursive sequences. Specifically, if your practice of "guarding the gates" is going ...


6

Sangaravo Sutta: Sangarava -- The Hindrances (SN 46.55) says that. It says that ... he cannot know or see, as it really is, what is to his own profit, nor can he know and see what is to the profit of others, or of both himself and others ... when overwhelmed and possessed by hindrances including ... sense-desires ill-will sloth-and-torpor worry-and-...


6

Fruition is more related to the 4 stages of sainthood. This is realising of the fruit (Pala) of practice. What his means is you realized the path.


6

So lets say i am having ill will thoughts do i just replace those thoughts with loving kindness instead? Or if im experiencing sloth and torpor, do i just replace and abandon those thoughts with exertion and striving? Yes, that would be one way of dealing with the hindrances. This is the first method. If that does not work, one moves on to the second method ...


6

what is the citation of that piti sukha simile for the 4 jhanas from? It's from the Visuddhimagga-Ch IV.100 (pg. 139): And wherever the two are associated, happiness is the contentedness at getting a desirable object, and bliss is the actual experiencing of it when got. Where there is happiness there is bliss (pleasure); but where there is bliss there ...


5

The word jhāna is Pali, so it stands to reason you wouldn't hear about it directly in other traditions. What you should be looking for are the following: Sanskrit: dhyāna Chinese: Chán (simplified Chinese: 禅; traditional Chinese: 禪) Japanese: Zen (禅) As far as differences go, I'm not sure which you are referring to, but I once skimmed through a ...


5

IMO, you are mixing apples and oranges. Metta meditation is practiced towards "the state of brahmas" (AN 4.190 and AN 3.63), not one of the Four Jhanas. The "state of brahmas" (brahmapatta) is a state of non-dualistic unity with the world. The way to attain it, is through progressively expanding the context of Metta meditation, starting from yourself, to ...


5

It's like asking what's your ATM security key. You might share it with a family member because they are your family and you trust them. Just like that, an Ariya Puggala might discuss his attainment with the Buddha or with Arya Sangha. But they wouldn't discuss it with ordinary lay people. You could observe the teacher's behavior for a while and see if he ...


5

It could be in any order: "There is the case where a monk has developed insight preceded by tranquillity...Then there is the case where a monk has developed tranquillity preceded by insight...Then there is the case where a monk has developed tranquillity in tandem with insight..." ~ AN 4.170 ~


5

Have a look at: Bhante Vimalaramsi Thanissaro Bhikkhu Forest Dhamma Forest Sangha Publications Buddhist eLibrary Manual of Mindfulness of Breathing


5

I guess the short answer is that in general the more intensive meditation practice you do the more familiar you will become with the jhanas and the more insight you will experience. Larry Rosenberg in Breath by Breath does say that retreats are needed to experience certain levels of insight. However he does emphasise practice in everyday life even more. ...


5

Although the higher jhanas are not required, they're strongly encouraged by the Buddha evident in the high frequency with which they are mentioned throughout the suttas. Ven. Gunaratana in his "The Jhanas" wrote: The Buddha is constantly seen in the suttas encouraging his disciples to develop jhana. The four jhanas are invariably included in the complete ...


5

Here is a quote on the terms "Hard and Soft Jhana" from the book "Mastering The Core Teachings Of The Buddha" by Daniel M. Ingram, p. 136-137: "Many traditions use the breath as the primary object initially and then shift to the qualities of the states themselves as the object of meditation when they arise and the concentration is strong. The quality of a ...


5

There is no samatha jhana nor is there vipassana jhana mentioned in the suttas, I may have missed it! There are the 4 rupa jhanas mentioned with each containing various jhana factors and 4 arupa jhanas. IMHO, the distinction is made to rationalise some meditation practices which dispense with the development of jhanas as a necessary step. Vipassanā ...


5

When a meditator achieves e.g. the 5th jhana of infinite space, is he or she still in this world? Yes, he doesn't disappear. When you sleep, you are not aware of what's happening around you. But that doesn't mean the world is gone. Obviously the body is, but what about the mind? Yes, the mind is still associated with the body. Just that it's focusing ...


5

I assume that by rapture and bliss you mean the Pali words Piti and Sukha. Piti and Sukha are supposed to be comfortable and pleasant states of mind that arise whenever the mind is sufficiently calm, abiding in itself. However, these states have degrees of maturity, and they are not always conventionally pleasant. Diarrhea or sensations of ants crawling for ...


5

Maybe MN 26 is more relevant: towards the end of it, the Five ask questions like, When this was said, the group of five monks replied to me, 'By that practice, that conduct, that performance of austerities you did not attain any superior human states, any distinction in knowledge & vision worthy of a noble one. So how can you now — living luxuriously, ...


5

Now i have anxiety attacks and at first was i was having an anxiety attack during the meditation. This does not look like Jhana. Jhana is blissful. Sometimes you might experience Piti and Sukkha. These may be intense.


5

I wouldn't worry about what it is or isn't and dont listen to what other people have to say about it either as everyone will have varying opinions and really they cannot know what you experience. You will end up feeling confused. The main thing to remember is that it was just a pleasant experience and like all experiences it arose and then passed. It's like ...


5

Absolutely not! Go for it! (Assuming when you say first Jhana, you actually mean first Jhana and not something else). "There is the case where a monk — quite withdrawn from sensuality, withdrawn from unskillful qualities — enters and remains in the first jhana: rapture and pleasure born from withdrawal, accompanied by directed thought and evaluation. He ...


5

your best first try is this essay perhaps this When Do the Jhānas Become Necessary? While there seem to be no suttas that impose an inflexible rule to the effect that a lay noble disciple must possess the jhānas, there are at least two texts that explicitly ascribe all four jhānas to certain householders. One, found in the Citta-saṃyutta (SN 41:9/...


4

In this context "advert" would mean to recall a cue that produces the desired effect. For example in second jhana, to produce rapture and happiness without the use of applied/sustained thought, one may turn attention to the muscles of the face, temples, neck, shoulders, diaphragm, chest -- and recall the sensations they experience when feeling happy and ...


4

This is a possibility with regard to mundane Dhyāna / Jhana. One such instance is Devadatta One good example from the Buddha’s time was Devadatta, who was a brother of princess Yasodhara. Devadatta became a monk and developed the mundane jhanas and attained those direct knowledges described above. He could perform many “miracles”, and one time he appeared ...


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