26

There is a lovely zen saying, a dialogue between new student and master: "Master, if I put in great effort every day to attain awakening, how long will it take?" The master replies, "20 years." "What if I work really really hard?" The master replies, "40 years." Wanting enlightenment is paradoxical, because enlightenment is the absence of defilement, ...


20

The orthodox view is that samatha meditation was not discovered by the Buddha and vipassana meditation was. On the origins of samatha meditation: Besides the fact that other teachers at the time of the Buddha and before were practicing what appears to be samatha and jhana, we have the fact that the Bodhisatta went into the first jhana as a young boy, and ...


12

The Buddha himself gave the answer in the Maha Satipatthana Sutta—The Greater Discourse on Steadfast Mindfulness or the Great Discourse on the Establishing Awareness (DN22): "Indeed, bhikkhus, whosoever practises these four satipatthanas in this manner for seven years, one of two results is to be expected in him: Arahatship in this very existence,...


11

The Visuddhimagga provides a pretty comprehensive explanation of how one obtains this and all the other psychic powers mentioned by the Buddha. Briefly, the method is as follows: Obtain the four rūpa-jhānas Exit the fourth jhāna and remember the last thing one did before one sat down. remember the last thing before the thing remembered in the last step. If ...


11

Call me an over-enthusiast but presently, the highest priority in my life is to achieve the object of Nirvana or moksha. This is good! You need enthusiasm to stay motivated in your practice.You also have a sense of urgency which will help you progress. By performing Vipassana, I want to achieve Nirvana and in this lifetime only. I'm prepared to do anything ...


10

Geez, ya'll are crazy. 30 minutes? I'd say WORK up to that maybe after a few months of practice but in the beginning it is best to LIKE MEDITATION and do PRACTICE PROPERLY rather than just loiter around and try to sit tight for 30 minutes thinking about Jane and Bob. I have had 3-5 minute sessions where you would NOT believe how much baggage I dropped and ...


9

I can't find the reference at the moment but if I recall correctly, the Buddha continued to meditate after enlightenment for two reasons, according to the Theravada tradition: (1) To dwell in a pleasant abiding here and now (jhana) (2) to set an example for his followers


9

IMHO, you should stop this nonsense. Sitting and waiting for insight is not going to work. Insight meditation is not meant to be waiting. Instead, it is meant to be examination of the elements of your immediate experience: Look at your thoughts. Where do they come, how do they switch. Who is watching? How do you get distracted and how do you recover focus? ...


8

I will try to answer from my point of view as a Vajrayana practitioner. I've been taught that one needs to have a relatively stable mind in order to practice insight meditation. But this doesn't mean that one has to spend years in Samatha meditation before trying Vipassana. In Mahayana and Vajrayana tradition too much tranquility and so-called 'inert ...


8

There are multiple stages of insight before you reach stream entry. Then there are the 4 stages of sainthood which follows which you can judge of the fetters and defilements that remain. Taking Dependent Origination into account the main issue leading to the conditioned existence is when we sense any sensations due to, we react with with like or dislike ...


8

Since you are asking from a specific tradition, I can give a pretty specific answer: Is this feeling expected at any meditation stage ? Yes, it is expected at the stage of bhaṅga-ñāṇa (knowledge of dissolution). Though generally available texts don't mention this phenomenon, teacher manuals make reference to it. Here is the general state that leads to this ...


8

While different traditions might emphasize one over the other, they all need a certain level of development for both: "These two qualities have a share in clear knowing. Which two? Tranquillity (samatha) & insight (vipassana). "When tranquillity is developed, what purpose does it serve? The mind is developed. And when the mind is developed, what ...


8

I think (please kindly correct me if i wrong) Vipassana is about letting go of control & judgement, and the meditator will just aware and accept things as it is. Will it be pain, thoughts, sound, and physical sensations like breath or a moving stomach (as we breath). That sounds more like shikantaza/zazen. Vipassanā means insight into reality: seeing ...


8

They are synonymous. Insight is in fact the word that is used to translate the word Vipassana. All schools of Buddhism that talk about meditation talk about Samatha and Vipassana (but of course they'll use the sanskrit names Shamatha and Vipashyana, or their translated terms 止 観 (Chinese Zhi and Guan, Japanese Shi and Kan) or in Tibetan shiné and lhatong. ...


8

I have also found this to be the case when practicing samatha meditation. Here is my understanding of why that is, and how to deal with it: In vipassana meditation, you do not need to "tune" sensations out. In fact, noticing them is part and parcel of the practice itself. Restlessness and agitation are thus sensations to be noticed and analyzed, and their ...


7

To put it succinctly you need to rub two pieces of wood long enough to get fire. Likewise you need to meditate continuously for some stretch of time to see results. As Goenka says "Continuity of practice is the secret of success".


7

The essential difference is that in Buddhist meditation, at some point one uses one's mind to actively examine and investigate one's direct experience and to realize it's nature that way. This is the seventh factor of the Noble Eightfold path, Right Mindfulness, Samma-Sati. It is described in the Sattipatthana Sutta like this: "There is the case where ...


7

Generally 1 hour in the morning and 1 hour in the evening / night is recommended by Goenka in his teaching. I think this would be a reasonable amount of time to get results though you will occasionally have to complement this with a retreat. Your target is maintaining mindfulness throughout the day, and hence practice 24/7, not only when you are siting on a ...


7

Things can go wrong in meditation. Some of the are as follows: If you are not equanimous, i.e., you are reacting to different situation thus creating negativity. This can accumulate to an extent this might be very dangerous. The basis of your meditation is greed, hatred or delusion. There are some techniques where the basis is this hence can easily go wrong....


7

Dry insight or bare insight (suddha-vipassana) is the 'direct' way (Pali: ekayano maggo) to insight (nibbana), without jhana meditation practice (i.e. without 'upacara samadhi' or 'appana samadhi'). This direct 'momentary concentration' is called in Pali parikamma samadhi. This is the tradition of Mahasi Sayadaw; U Ba Khin and S.N. Goenka and others. The ...


7

There were fourteen questions to which Buddha remained silent. The universe is eternal, The universe is not eternal.. were two of them. Read the following sutta. MN 63 - Cula-Malunkyovada Sutta: The Shorter Instructions to Malunkya One day a man called Malunkyaputta approached the Buddha and demanded that He explain these questions to him. He even ...


7

The "passion" you talk about sounds like a craving for something which you haven't defined. Your question seems to be asking, "I crave something (I crave something to feel passionate about), but I don't know how to find the object of my craving. Can Buddhism tell me how to find what I crave?" I think that basic Buddhism teaches one to recognize that "...


6

30 minutes is good. Over time the benefits will build up. In the words of the Dhammapada: Think not lightly of good, saying, "It will not come to me." Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the wise man, gathering it little by little, fills himself with good. Dhp 122


6

Though there is no definite record who his teacher was, it is said he learned it from someone else when he was in the Monywa region in the side of Lak-pan-taung Mountain. Also there is reference that this is the Traditional Burmese method. This is mentioned in the VRI and pariyatti.org biography. VRI teachers Vipassana as handed down in the Ledi linage. VRI ...


6

Often mediators will get stuck in Samatha thinking that they have become permanently enlightened. Samatha takes away all the defilments but it's only temporary. Also mediators could get addicted to the bliss and calm that samatha brings. So, yes there is vipassana only approaches called "dry insight meditation" like in the Mahasi tradition that is perfect ...


6

Becoming a monk is not necessary to attain Nirvana. In the time of the Buddha there were great numbers of laypeople who attained stream entry, a fair number of laypeople who became non-returners, and even a few laypeople who managed to be able to make it all the way to Arahatship, so you can see that monasticism isn't a prerequisite for enlightenment. ...


6

Two reasons: The mind gets lost in the contents very easily, so having an anchor (base object) will not let it go too far and for too long. The anchor forces you to let go of stuff every time you come back, which is very useful and pushes the mind into the practice. Letting go of control and judgment (or letting go of anything in the moment it arises -- to ...


6

A hammer has two ends for a reason; one end is great for pounding nails, but not at taking them out. The nose is avoided in Vipassana for a reason; it is too apt to lead to calm. That being said, it is of course technically possible to cultivate insight at the nose, if you insist. Vipassana takes as its base the four elements, earth, air, water, and fire. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible