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1

Buddhist endgoal is that it shouldn't occur to one ''i am a woman', or 'i am a man' or 'i am anything at all', there being no 'i am' there don't come to be 'i am good/bad' or 'may i be' or 'may i not be like this or that', one to whom this does not occur is not going to compare oneself to others or brag about it. One who compares himself to others and brags ...


1

I'm of the opinion that nobody should ever call himself or herself a Buddhist under any circumstances. After all, the Buddha said that the true Dharma would disappear after 500 years, and that was many many centuries ago; that should be enough to resolve the debate. On a more esoteric note, the Buddha taught that the self does not exist - so how can any ...


1

do I misunderstand them? How might I know if you do? "Misunderstanding" might mean that your description doesn't match some kind of "truth", or "other evidence" -- but your description is the only evidence. there are very few Buddhists in the culture where I live, but most of them seem to be constantly bragging Could this ...


4

This is a typical (and common) stage in spiritual development. In my country, I mainly see it in a wide variety of Christians; it's common enough in Buddhist circles as well, but the Buddhist population is small by comparison. There are are a couple of things happening here that are worth considering when you run into such people: Such people are generally ...


1

Why? When you pick a stone you weigh it on your hand and say 'Ummm this is heavy". Then even if the stone speaks and says 'I'm not heavy' you won't believe it. In the same way, why do you call them Buddist? Next time when you hear them speak a cryptic language say these people are probably grammarian or language translators don't say they are Buddhist. ...


0

The OP wrote: If we're in a group with many other people, it's always them who bring up the topic of spirituality. Or if I meet an acquaintance who is not so close as to engage in deep conversations, and we would just generally exchange some pleasantries, "how are you? I'm fine, thanks", they instead start to instantly brag about how spiritually ...


6

What you are noticing is a familiar behavioural pattern unearthed by various Buddhists practices. In Tibetan and Theravada Buddhism it is called Māna or to use the more user-friendly term: conceit. Theravada sees this as one of the very last fetters to fall away. Conceit can be quite a horrible one. I have experienced this myself and still do on the odd ...


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