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Mendis refers to “Theravāda tradition”. His source is the introduction to the Atthasālinī, which was compiled by Buddhaghosa in about 400 AD based on earlier texts that no longer exist. The Abhidhamma is a framework that consolidates teachings from more than 10,000 Suttas. This framework follows the Theravāda perspective. IMHO, the scholar’s view that the ...


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The word "soul" translated here (DN 23) by Bhikkhu Sujato is "jīva". In the context of this sutta, this word means "life force", and not "self". The sutta is trying to say that although you cannot see the soul leaving, still there is rebirth. That means that according to Kassapa, there is rebirth without the movement of a life force or soul. So, it is this ...


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You wrote ... (Payasi argues there is no soul so no afterlife.) However, Kassapa, one of the principal disciples of Gautama Buddha, argues there is a soul. ... but I don't think so. Instead I think the dialog or argument in the sutta is: Payasi: there is no afterlife because we don't see a visible soul leaving the body at death Kassapa: the ...


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I believe you're looking for Velāma Sutta (AN 9:20). Here's Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu's translation: https://www.dhammatalks.org/suttas/AN/AN9_20.html


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With many traditions and teachers to choose from, how should one figure out what is the true Dhamma? From AN 8.53 "Gotami, the qualities of which you may know, 'These qualities lead to passion, not to dispassion; to being fettered, not to being unfettered; to accumulating, not to shedding; to self-aggrandizement, not to modesty; to discontent, not to ...


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From this YouTube video entitled "The Theravada Abhidhamma with Bhikkhu Bodhi (Class #1, 5 Mar 2018)", Ven. Bodhi, the famous translator and scholar of the Pali Canon, explained the account of modern scholarship, which he accepts to be more accurate, compared to the traditional account: That is the traditional view, but modern scholarship takes a ...


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How do you know that you have arrived at the true Dhamma? From MN 9: Ven. Sariputta said, "When a disciple of the noble ones discerns what is unskillful, discerns the root of what is unskillful, discerns what is skillful, and discerns the root of what is skillful, it is to that extent that he is a person of right view, one whose view is made straight, ...


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There's one here -- Dhammānussati: Svākkhāto bhagavatā dhammo: sandiṭṭhiko akāliko ehipassiko opaneyyiko paccattaṃ veditabbo viññūhī ti. The Dhamma is well declared by the Bhagavā: visible here and now, immediate, inviting to come and see, effective, to be individually ascertained by the wise. If you use a mouse to hover over one of the coloured words (of ...


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And there the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Now, bhikkhus, I shall make known to you the four great references. Listen and pay heed to my words." And those bhikkhus answered, saying: "So be it, Lord." Then the Blessed One said: "In this fashion, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu might speak: 'Face to face with the Blessed One, ...


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"Of course you are uncertain, Kalamas. Of course you are in doubt. When there are reasons for doubt, uncertainty is born. So in this case, Kalamas, don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, 'This contemplative ...


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Perhaps you are confusing the word "adultery" with the words "reproduction" and "sex". When you eat food, you are definitely supplying energy to the body and giving it the necessary ingredients for cells to reproduce. The cells in your body do not have sex to reproduce. Sex by the way, is not against the five precepts, if practised within the context of a ...


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There's Buddhist doctrine on that subject in the Bhikkhuni Sutta (AN 4.159): 'This body, sister, comes into being through food. And yet it is by relying on food that food is to be abandoned.' Thus was it said. And in reference to what was it said? There is the case, sister, where a monk, considering it thoughtfully, takes food — not playfully, nor for ...


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What's the difference between eating food and adultery? Big difference. Without food, you'll die and completely miss the rarest chance to cultivate the Path in this human form. You will not die due to not having adultery. And not only that you completely miss the rarest chance to cultivate the Path, you'd completely wreck it. Matter of fact, engaging in ...


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Of course traditionally Theravada Buddhism has regarded Nagarjuna as not one of its own. He has too long been claimed by Mahayana to expect otherwise. But some relatively recent scholarship regards him as a transitional figure, with close affinities -- as you suspect -- to Early Buddhism. In fact, a very strong case can be made that he regarded himself ...


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