6

Time in DN 16, MahaParinibbanaSutta, is already clear for the Sutta Pali memorizer, but it's hard for the reader because it's too long for skipping reading. Memorizing with the memorized & enlightened monk is the way to study tipitaka faster&easier really really. In DN 16... Ven.Sariputta's Lion's Roar (no. 16) comes first story, then the Buddha ...


4

Yes the ten kasina mediations are in The Middle-length Suttas (Book 2, Chapter 3, Sutta 7 “Great Sakuludayi Sutta”), and I have heard they are other places, but havent come across those. “Again, Udāyin, I have proclaimed to my disciples the way to develop the ten kasiṇa bases. One contemplates the earthkasiṇa above, below, and across, undivided and ...


4

Go on as a formal assistant to monks, even better as novice or monk, good householder, as it is good if you have ways to associate with the Venerables. The rest is all a matter of individual deeds (kamma). Do not waste one moment when kusala citta arises, as defilements are quick to return. As for formal assistants: Community Officials: All Community ...


3

Ud 8.7 tells the story of a junior monk accompanying the Buddha who disobeyed the Buddha, was disrespectful to him (please see this footnote for details), dropped the Buddha's possessions and abandoned him. He was shortly attacked by thieves. I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was journeying along a road in the Kosalan country with Ven. ...


3

This is well explained by Ven. Thanissaro in his commentary to MN 122: This sutta gives many valuable lessons on practical issues surrounding the attempt to develop an internal meditative dwelling of emptiness, to maintain it, and to see it through to Awakening. Some of these issues include the need for seclusion as a conducive setting for the practice, ...


3

This is as close as it gets afaik; A2. "Because there actually is the next world, the view of one who thinks, 'There is no next world' is his wrong view. Because there actually is the next world, when he is resolved that 'There is no next world,' that is his wrong resolve. Because there actually is the next world, when he speaks the statement, 'There ...


3

Obviously that entire text was authored by someone else, speaking about the Buddha in the third person. In my understanding, the part about the Buddha leaving the quarreling Sangha is based on real events, while the thoughts going through Buddha's mind must be the author's conjecture. To be clear, I'm not saying Buddha did not leave the quarreling Sangha for ...


2

In SN 15.5, SN 15.6, an individual monk and in SN 15.8, an individual brahmin lay person, spoke to the Buddha, and asked a question about the length of an eon. The Buddha answered it and then reflected on how samsara (translated by Ven. Sujato as "transmigration") has been going on for a very long time, with an unknown beginning, and tells the ...


2

I'm a thai and my english is very basic. I found this in wikipedia, and it looks like a slander because they put the less reference, and miss the point. Many bias point the reader out of the reference. Everyone can show up their opinions, and we should listen to them respectfully, but it doesn't mean "proper" when they show up their opinions by ...


1

A Theravada Buddhist lay attendant or steward is called a kappiyakāraka or Kappiya in short. According to the PTS Pali-English dictionary entry on Kappiya: Kappiyakāraka "one who makes it befitting," i. e. who by offering anything to a Bhikkhu, makes it legally acceptable Vin i.206; Basically, the lay attendant or steward, a kappiyakāraka, is the ...


1

Transcending form, leaving stress behind, perception shifts to space: MN121:6.1: Furthermore, a mendicant—ignoring the perception of wilderness and the perception of earth—focuses on the oneness dependent on the perception of the dimension of infinite space. Transcending space, leaving stress behind, perception shifts to consciousness: MN121:7.1: ...


1

Similar to Andrei's answer I note (as fact) that it's a narration of what the Buddha thought, not what he said. Going even further I might speculate that it's similar to Mother's saying to children, "While sitting in his office, Dad thought, 'Isn't it good that the children are playing quietly, and doing their homework'" -- i.e. it's said to convey ...


1

This might be exactly what you're looking for: https://discourse.suttacentral.net/t/the-woman-who-raised-the-buddha-by-wendy-garling/20804


1

The Buddha and his wife were first cousins through his paternal aunt, Amita. You can check out the numbered references on the wiki page to get more information from the listed sources. Yaśodharā was the daughter of King Suppabuddha,[4][5] and Amita, sister of the Buddha's father, King Śuddhodana. She was born on same day in the month of "Vaishaka" ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible