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See SN 46.3 http://lucid24.org/sn/sn46/sn46-003/index.html sati-sambojjhanga remembers Dhamma-teaching, then thinks (vitakka) about that Dharma. Dhamma-vicaya-sambojjhnaga investigates that Dharma-teaching recollected by sati, by means of vicara (evaluation) paññāya (same word as the sampajano, what B. thanissaro translates as 'alertness'). ātāpi = ...


5

From Khuddaka Nikaya's The Questions of King Milinda (translation mine): ‘Venerable Nagasena, what is the characteristic mark of vitakka*?’ ‘The characteristic mark of vitakka is "placing" (Appanā), Your Majesty.’ ‘Give me an example.’ ‘For example, Your Majesty, like a carpenter takes well-finished boards of wood and places (appeti) ...


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The way it's used in Buddhism, sati/smrti means continuously remembering something, being mindful of something, continuously keeping something in mind. The traditional metaphor is the mindfulness of hunger -- when you are very hungry you don't forget that you are hungry. If I remember correctly, before Buddhism, in Hinduism (or whatever that conglomerate of ...


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The word Sati (Smrti in Sanskrit) literally means remembrance or recollection, but as with many Buddhist technical terms has a more specialized meaning in a meditative context. In the context of meditation the word Sati has a more general meaning to set the mind on the object of meditation. For example, the meditation in which one contemplates the attributes ...


4

Maybe your friend meant to say that an arahant no longer has to consciously make an effort to develop sati? An arahant has developed all 8 limbs of the Noble Eightfold Path to perfection such that they've become second nature. To him, sati's no longer an effort to be developed. It's become his way of life. It's like a novice martial arts student at first has ...


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Sloth and Topher is the fifth Mara. It activated when all other previous four maras are inactivated. For instance, when you watch TV the first mara is in charge. When you listen to Dhamma if the fourth Mara is not in charge you will go to sleep. This is a complex case. The way to avoid this is to practice walking meditation. https://dhammawheel.com/...


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The instruction to do "one thing at a time" is implied by the Buddha's praise of Sāriputta's practice, which was intense, deep and accomplished methodically one by one: MN111:1.6: The Buddha said this: “Sāriputta is astute, mendicants. He has great wisdom, widespread wisdom, laughing wisdom, swift wisdom, sharp wisdom, and penetrating wisdom. For a ...


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I believe you asked this exact question on our monk radio broadcast last week. Here's the answer, for reference: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwDVIzD3O00


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I think the word you're looking for is Anupassanā [abstr. of anupassati, cf. Sk. anudarśana] looking at, viewing, contemplating, consideration, realisation It's used in compound words like Kāyānupassanā (and Vedanānupassanā, Cittānupassanā, and Dhammānupassanā). The fact that the second 'a' in "Kāyānupassanā" is long (i.e. with an accent on it, '...


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I'm not sure what you mean about outward quality.So forgive me if I got it wrong.I think being mindful is not the same as remembering your groceries.I can be completely mindful of walking but as long as the thought of grocery doesn't arise I won't remember it.So its more about remembering to stay in the present moment.Also outward characters that shows ...


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That's not what DN 16 appears to say. The Buddha, who is also an Arahant, endured his physical pains mindfully (sati) according to DN 16. After the Buddha had commenced the rainy season residence, he fell severely ill, struck by dreadful pains, close to death. Atha kho bhagavato vassūpagatassa kharo ābādho uppajji, bāḷhā vedanā vattanti ...


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the condition for sati is proper attention I say that mindfulness and situational awareness is fueled by something, it’s not unfueled. And what is the fuel for mindfulness and situational awareness? You should say: ‘Proper attention.’ https://suttacentral.net/an10.62/en/sujato


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Samma Sati is a factor of Noble Eightfold Path. Yonisomanasikara is a factor of Sotapanna. Perhaps Yonisomanasikara is the fruit of following the path. (practicing Satipathana) Further reading: Association with people of integrity is a factor for stream-entry. Listening to the true Dhamma is a factor for stream-entry. Appropriate attention is a factor for ...


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Normal memory is bound up in craving (e.g., "I remember that pretty face"). Or normal memory is bound up in aversion (e.g., "You ALWAYS pick on me!"). Or normal memory is bound up in delusion (e.g., "I want to be like that famous person"). The memory of sati requires awareness without craving, aversion or delusion. That's surprisingly difficult and requires ...


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The Buddha is a bit circular on this point: SN46.51:18.1: And what starves the arising of the awakening factor of mindfulness, or, when it has arisen, starves its full development? There are things that are grounds for the awakening factor of mindfulness. Not frequently focusing on them starves the arising of the awakening factor of mindfulness, or, ...


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Here from the Sutta The Blessed One said, "Suppose, monks, that a large crowd of people comes thronging together, saying, 'The beauty queen! The beauty queen!' And suppose that the beauty queen is highly accomplished at singing & dancing, so that an even greater crowd comes thronging, saying, 'The beauty queen is singing! The beauty queen is ...


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Zero sati would be insanity: breaking precepts, acting on every urge... A person with zero sati would have less control than that of an animal An anagami has perfect sati. In fact, an anagami is considered one perfected in consideration. Thus, one with perfect sati would have no desire or aversion: they would be entirely dispassionate.


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Zero sati is a sad situation: AN8.29:7.1: Furthermore, a Realized One has arisen in the world. And a person is reborn in a central country. But they’re witless, dull, stupid, and unable to distinguish what is well said from what is poorly said. This is the seventh lost opportunity … Yet there is also wrong mindfulness, attending to the unskillful: ...


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According to Abhidhamma, we can do only one thing at a time. (mind or thought-moment) However, as we are not paying attention we think they all happen at once. When you practice Satipathana you will understand this. When you practice Samatha you keep your attention only on the meditation object. In Vipassana you keep your attention only on one bodily ...


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Anapanasati has 4 tetrads with 4 steps each making 16 steps in total: Different Suttas cover all 16 or a subset of them. E.g. Maha Satipattana Sutta / Satipattana Sutta covers only the 1st tetrad. In this context let go, the translation followed by Piya Tan is: (16) He trains himself thus: ‘I will breathe in, contemplating the letting go (of defilements)’; ...


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Sati is often translated as "mindful of." So Ānāpānasati means: "mindfulness of in-and out-breathing" or "conscious of in-and-out breath" However, part of the act of doing this is partially somatic, your body experiencing itself, your emotions, thoughts, etc. experienced as they are in and of themselves. It's not a purely mental exercise. It's not reflecting ...


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