12

At a higher level the 8 fold path consists of 3 fold training: Development of morality Development of control or mastery over the mined Development of knowledge of the reality pertaining to one's mind and cognitive process There is nothing in the above which a lay person cannot develop or not reap benefits by developing. Being a monk you have less ...


10

You could choose to say the following: "Yes i know which direction the rabbit went. I do however choose not to share that information since it will probably lead to the killing of the animal and the creation of unwholesome kamma for you (hunter)". This way you are honest but choose not to give the information because you know what might happen. This way ...


9

I started to read a book, The Buddha's Teachings on Prosperity written by Bhikkhu Basnagoda Rahula. This book says: The Buddha recognizes and admires happiness The Buddha wants laypeople (lay society) to be happy, prosperous, ethical The Buddha says that worldly happiness (sensory satisfaction) and the happiness of renunciation (giving up sensory ...


8

There is the: 8 Fold Path is the practice up to Sotapanna, and 10 Fold Path for full enlightenment The Noble 8 Fold Path is the practice up to Sotapanna. Source: Maha Cattarīsaka Sutta intorduction To go beyond Sotapanna one must add 2 more elements under liberation/release which are: right knowledge right freedom Maha Cattarīsaka Sutta


7

In a short piece called Right Speech by Thanissaro Bhikkhu he defines idle chatter as that "spoken with no purposeful intent at all". and he stresses the important of intention in speaking. Right speech, explained in negative terms, means avoiding four types of harmful speech: lies (words spoken with the intent of misrepresenting the truth); ...


7

Just because someone asks for something, does not mean you're obligated to provide it. The third option is to ask the hunter why, and say "Not telling." if he's set out to kill the rabbit.


6

The whole of the Noble Path can be summarized as the action, speech, effort, intent etc. coming from the two kinds of thoughts as explained in MN 19: Bhikkhus, before my enlightenment, while I was still only an unenlightened Bodhisatta, it occurred to me: ‘Suppose that I divide my thoughts into two classes [-- useful and harmful]. ... As I abided thus, ...


6

Samma Sankappa (right thinking) is the result of right view (Samma Ditthi). If you have the wrong view your thinking will be wrong thinking. (Mittcha Sankappa) Generally, right view is the forerunner for the rest of the Noble Eightfold Path. For example seeing things as impermanent is the right view and seeing things as permanent is the wrong view. With the ...


6

It leads to non-regret, one who has non-regret gets serene one who gets serene gets concentrated So it acts as foundation for concentration, meditative methods use and further develope that same concentration faculty which in turn supports developement of discernment and wisdom. Sutta references: AN 10.2 & AN 11.2


6

Picking cherries is not a wrong livelihood as long as you are not the one spraying the pesticides. Spraying pesticides is a wrong livelihood as it harms others (by doing activities which do not fall under right action to earn a living). Generally, distancing yourself from this activity would be fine as long as you can say free from remorse. If you are not ...


5

The option remains to simply say nothing. I find that to be an often-forgotten option in many, many circumstances.


5

A simple question. A simple answer: Of course it can! It's as simple as this: Right view: see the 3 characteristics and 6 realms Right intention: take the 4 vows of universal salvation as a Buddha Right action: ahimsa, non-stealing, no sexual misconduct, no intoxication Right speech: avoid idle, harmful, unskillful speech Right livelihood: have a good ...


5

It is actually a nice realization, to see oneself like you did. I remember when I got mine, I was about 20 - and I was shocked to realize all my re-actions were motivated by desire to make myself look better in others' eyes. This means you are getting mature. This is normal, especially when we are young(er). It is well known that small children are often ...


4

It seems this was already answered sufficiently here: https://buddhism.stackexchange.com/a/1421/18 (Posting as an answer just to get this resolved)


4

Here is a quote on "Idle chatter" from the book "The Noble Eightfold Path" by Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi, p. 48-49. The highlights are made by me as an answer to your question regarding what idle chatter is and conversation with family. Abstaining from idle chatter (samphappalapa veramani). He avoids idle chatter and abstains from it. He speaks ...


4

This book I quote sometimes for guidance on modern-day lay life, The Buddha's Teachings on Prosperity, says "avoid senseless talk" (the Pali word for which, whose meaning we should try to understand, is samphappalapa), which it categorizes as follows: Words spoken at the wrong time (e.g. inappropriate to the occasion) Words that contain untruth or ...


4

It's somewhat sloppy language... "stored up potency" doesn't really mean anything; it's a concept, the concept that certain experiences will somehow be related to other experiences. There is nothing in Theravada Buddhism, AFAIK, even hinting at karma being stored up, or of a continuum being imprinted. So, it should probably be understood as conventional ...


4

This is my personal favorite. I have had this happen so many times although the victim was my mother who had to do a lot of things and I contributed a bit in a constructive fashion. This seems to be a fairly common case experienced by many hospitable people. So the deal here is that I would not worry what the noble eight fold path says or whatever. This is ...


4

The monks are trained to be humble to lessen the stranglehold of ego and the defilments. When the Buddha addresses the monks in the suttas he calls them "Bhikkus" in Pali that means "Beggars" in English. This Isn't derogatory, it's a teaching.


4

Presumably the "8 requisites" of a monk, i.e. the 8 items that a monk is allowed and needs: 3 robes, an alms bowl, a waistband, a razor, a sewing kit and a water strainer.


4

I think that to ask "Is it possible for a worldling to walk the path?" is similar to asking "Is it possible for a person to become enlightened?" I think the usual answer to the latter question is that enlightenment isn't personal and that notions of being a person aren't helpful, they're even a hindrance. But the way the question is phrased -- "people with ...


4

My teacher said, the key difference between those Buddhists that only speculate based on the theories they read in books, and those Buddhists that actually know what they are talking about, is meditation.


4

No, the canonical definition of the Eightfold Path does NOT include any explicit mention of celibacy. The actual language is both broader and goes further than mere sexual abstinence. The right action (samma-kammanta) is defined as abstaining from (three) major types of wrong conduct, one of which is: Kamesu micchacara Kamesu is a form of word Kama, ...


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