We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
15

Craving is when the baby reaches with desire for the pacifier and clinging is when the baby has the pacifier and won't let it go. To distinguish craving from clinging, Buddhaghosa uses the following metaphor in this source: "Craving is the aspiring to an object that one has not yet reached, like a thief's stretching out his hand in the dark; clinging ...


12

The Buddha likely spoke in several dialects that were quite similar to Pali. He was immensely well traveled for his time, so in his travels he likely adopted the native dialect to be better understood by the locals. His words were only a small part of his teaching - his enlightened presence and conduct were likely better vessels of his teaching. The Pali ...


12

The short answer is no, and no. The Pāḷi Canon is a translation. Although people in Central Ganges Valley all spoke closely related dialects at the time we think the Buddha lived. The problem of having different words for things was noted at least once in a Pāli text. In MN iii.234 (Araṇavibhanga Sutta) that there can be many local words for the same object, ...


10

CORELESSNESS Before we can pick a translation we must understand what it is that we are translating. Prefix an- is a simple negation. Hindu concept of Atman should not be confused with Aham (the simple reflexive "I", "ego" or "self") nor with Jiva (the vitality that makes an animate being an animate being). Atman means "inner spirit" or "core" and refers ...


9

What are the different interpretations and translations and what might be the most correct interpretation according to the different lines of practice? How are they rationalized? Here are some: Etymology: pari- is a prefix used with the connotation of around, about, all over, or that of completeness. Thus dhāvati means 'to run' and paridhāvati ...


9

Learning Pali is indeed beneficial if you have a inclination to be a scholar or to teach. If it is your salvation you are after you are better off spending time practicing. But to teach others the bar is much higher than practicing on your own. This is also a worthy cause.


7

I agree with those who praise learning Canonical languages. Studying Pāli texts in Pāli is very rewarding. I have found my understanding of the Buddha's teaching blossomed through reading Pāli texts. I enjoying reading texts in Pāḷi and I teach beginners Pāḷi around my local Buddhist Centre. Pāḷi is not a difficult language to learn. I would start there. ...


7

There's a word Anussati Anussati Anussati (f.) [Sk. anusmṛti, fr. anu + smṛ, cp. sati] remembrance, recollection, thinking of, mindfulness. A late list of subjects to be kept in mind comprises six anussati -- ṭṭhānāni, viz. Buddha˚, Dhamma˚, Sangha˚, sīla˚, cāga˚, devatā˚, i. e. proper attention to the Buddha, the Doctrines, the Church, to morality, ...


7

Samatha is tranquility meditation, meditating on a stable object with the objective of reaching calm states/jhanas. Samadhi is concentration. The Buddha's teachings of the eightfold noble path are divided into three categories; sila (morality), samadhi (concentration), and panna (wisdom/understanding). Samadhi is the meditation portion of the Buddha's ...


7

Repeated craving becomes clinging. Another name for clinging is attachment. Craving: 3 Types of craving: Sensual craving Craving to be Craving not to be Attachment: Once attachment forms it's painful to sever. We protect our object of attachment. We like to be with our object of attachment. We pine when we are apart from our object of attachment. ...


7

From the Anapanasati Sutta "Mindfulness of in-&-out breathing, when developed & pursued, is of great fruit, of great benefit. Mindfulness of in-&-out breathing, when developed & pursued, brings the four frames of reference to their culmination. The four frames of reference, when developed & pursued, bring the seven factors for ...


6

Thanissaro's translations are... unique. The word being used, as others have pointed out, is "mano", the leader of an irregular group of nouns called the "manogana" - "the group with mano as its leader". The PED has a huge article on mano, worth reading in full if you're interested. I've copied the gist of it below, but as you should see, it is probably ...


6

kalāpa in the sense you are thinking is used in the commentaries. The word is generally used in the suttas to mean "bundle", as in yavakalāpa - bundle of grass, or dhanukalāpa - sheaf of arrows. I can't pinpoint the first usage of the word to mean "smallest particle of matter", but the Visuddhimagga uses it in this way: “But since neither of these is a ...


6

I think there are some very good and apposite questions here. I find I meet two kinds of Buddhists online. Those committed to the idea that the Pāḷi Canon is something like the Bible, the words of the Buddha and thus an ultimate authority. These kind are mostly, but not only, Theravādin Buddhists. To a lesser extent one also sees this kind of ideological ...


6

why does 'birth' ('jati'), seemingly a singular process, seem to refer to the multiple births of multiple beings into the multiple orders/groups of beings? jāti is singular in the passage quoted, so it is not referring to multiple births. sattanikaye is also singular, so "in this or that group of beings". Why is the plural Pali word 'sattānaṃ' contained ...


5

The Pali Canon was compiled hundreds of years after the Buddha, but we know from comparative studies that the bulk of the material contained in it (and for that matter, the Suttas of the other schools) does go back quite a ways. As for the language, that's a hard thing to answer. From a linguistic standpoint, Pali seems to be a blend of several eastern and ...


5

The Buddha is believed to have spoken Magahi. The relationship to Pali is discussed articles relating to Prakrit and Magadhi Prakrit.


5

Normally, the word does not have any moral sense as some suttas indicate: The Blessed One said: "Suppose an elephant hunter were to enter an elephant forest and were to see there a large elephant footprint, long in extent and broad in width. A skilled (kusalo) elephant hunter would not yet come to the conclusion, 'What a big bull elephant!' Why is ...


5

Conceptually, Buddhist ethics is very simple and elegant, at least in my limited understanding. The state of Buddha (Nirvana) is taken as the gold standard of all the best. While Samsara, and within Samsara the hell realm particularly, with its absolute dukkha, is taken as the worst possible condition. Psychologically, subjectively, Hell is defined as state ...


5

My understanding is the following: Rupa = external and internal matter or form. Externally, rupa is the physical world. Internally, rupa includes the material body and the physical sense organs. Kaya = the material body and the physical sense organs.


5

In Tibetan tradition torpor (Pali middha) is explained as heavy sleepiness, while sloth (Pali thina) is explained as laziness, lack of motivation. So in case of sloth, you are not drowsy, just don't feel like striving. While in case of torpor, you kinda want to strive but can't, because your mind is so unwieldy.


5

A class of semi divine beings who inhabit the Catummaharajika realm and are the lowest among the devas. They are generally classed together with the Asuras and the Nagas. Beings are born among them as a result of having practised the lowest form of sila. They are said to be able to receive merits from humans.


5

(Bear in mind, I don't have mastery over the language but I've been swimming in it continuously for the last two years. The following advice is based on this experience.) There is a whole list of books about learning Pāḷi. Some of them you can find here. I suggest applying the grammar that you learn from them, in Yuttadhammo's Digital Pali Reader (DPR) ...


5

Also check out suttacentral.net, really good sources in Pali, Chinese, Sanskrit, Tibetan and various different language translations..


5

It's the fourfold assembly consisting of monks, nuns, laymen, and laywomen.


5

He trains himself to breathe in sensitive to mental processes, and to breathe out sensitive to mental processes. (Cittasaṅkhārapaṭisaṃvedī assasissāmīti sikkhati. Cittasaṅkhārapaṭisaṃvedī passasissāmīti sikkhati.) He trains himself to breathe in sensitive to the mind, and to breathe out sensitive to the mind. (Cittapaṭisaṃvedi ...


5

Contrary to popular misapprehension, Buddhism is not a cult of "source material". It is not actually the case that the point of Buddha's message has been lost, and now generations after generations of practitioners try to deduce it from texts. Buddhism is a living tradition, that at large has never lost the path. Sure, there were some misunderstandings here ...


4

Actually, the only good translation I can think of for the English "mindfulness" is Sampajañña. sam = full, pa = full, jañña = knowledge (or awareness). Another potential candidate is yoniso (to the source) manasikara (minding). What is pretty clear is that sati does not translate to mindfulness. sati comes from the root /sar, which means to remember or ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible