25

There is a famous set of verses of the Buddha that go as follows: “All conditioned things are impermanent” – when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering. This is the path to purification. “All conditioned things are unsatisfactory” – when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering. This is the path to ...


15

I don't suppose that any of us are qualified to advise you on your marriage or the optimal duration of it. In theory, I really don't think it's fair to say that Buddhist love is non-romantic. The Nakulamata Sutta (AN 4:55) is a perfect counter-example; it is a promise the Buddha gave to a blissfully married couple to be united again in the next life. The ...


8

How can I solve my problems if I'm not totally immersed in the future, thinking about all the possibilities? In a sense, the answer is because being immersed in the future is a large part of the problem. Buddhism doesn't recognize the things you call problems as real problems. They are conventional problems that only obtain the designation because of your ...


8

It is 'anatta' that means our inability to control the five aggregate, as found in the Pali as follows, where the word 'anicca' is not found at all: Rūpaṃ, bhikkhave, anattā. Rūpañca hidaṃ, bhikkhave, attā abhavissa, nayidaṃ rūpaṃ ābādhāya saṃvatteyya, labbhetha ca rūpe: ‘evaṃ me rūpaṃ hotu, evaṃ me rūpaṃ mā ahosī’ti. Yasmā ca kho, bhikkhave, rūpaṃ ...


7

She is your Buddha, your dharma, and your sangha. Love the world through your love for her. Your marriage is your refuge and your bodhimandala. It is the place where you will awaken - no less perfect or profound than any other vow you may take. Don’t let your attachment to the idea of perfection ruin this opportunity.


6

According to my present (non-sectarian) teacher, the way the Three Marks are to be used is not simply as dogma to be mindful of, but rather as a tool for enquiry into our psyche -- our attachments, or preconceptions. The way to use Three Marks for enquiry into preconceptions is to try accepting one Mark at a time and see what resistance it causes. For ...


6

It really depends who you ask, and what you mean by "contemplate". The Buddha said: When one sees with wisdom that 'all formations are impermanent', this is the path of purification. (Dhp. 277) So the actual path is through "seeing" impermanence. One might correct your question to say that self-enlightenment can be achieved through ...


6

Yes. It is ok.


6

Change is permanent. The Laws of Nature (Dhamma) are permanent. The unchanging Nibbana (Nirvana) is also permanent. Buddhism explains only conditioned things (sankhara) are impermanent; thus conditioned impermanent things are permanently impermanent. The Dhamma (Natural Truth) is permanent (but not-self). This is standard Buddhism, as follows: ...


6

Eating food is impermanent. After a few minutes, the food is chewed & swallowed. After 24 hours or so, the food becomes excrement. However, we still eat food. Similarly, your lives as husband & wife are impermanent. However, this does not mean to not remain married until life ends. You made a spoken commitment or promise to your wife; which as a ...


6

Buddhism does not contradict romantic love; Buddhism contradicts romantic obsession. Granting that this is a terribly difficult discrimination for most people to make — confusing love with obsession is typical of almost everyone in almost every place — it's still an important discrimination to make. When you go into meditation you should strive to free ...


5

This very point is a subject of doctrinal disagreement between Mahayana and Theravada. According to Theravada, Nibbana has svabhava (self-nature) that is unconditioned, deathless and totally transcendent to the conditioned world. But according to Mahayana (specifically Madhyamika), the fact that Nirvana is called shunyata means it does not have svabhava, ...


5

The ancient extinct Kadampa school of Tibetan Buddhism (not the NKT, New Kadampa Tradition, which is an unsanctioned "breakaway" school) practiced mindfulness of death. Their motto was: Base your mind on the Dharma Base your Dharma on a humble life Base your humble life on the thought of death Base your death on an empty, barren hollow. "The ...


5

My answer assumes you are specifically referring to the ideas of Heraclitus (the originator of Western ideas of Becoming). There are some interesting correlates between the origins of the Western idea of flux or becoming which was first articulated by the Greek philosopher Heraclitus and the Buddha's idea of Impermanence (Anicca). For Heraclitus ... ...


5

Here is the simple answer to what you feel... We are in constant pain and suffering. As to lord Buddha Eyes,Ears,Tongue,Nose,Body & Mind are Burning from three things (Lust,Anger,Confusion -[Raga,Dwesha,Moha]). But the one who practice and realize escape the burning forever,he is free. So here's what is happening to you... Now that you have ...


5

That is two questions. I'll answer the second. Things are not unsatisfactory in themselves because they don't have selves. Anicca is the flip side of Anatta (non-self). Because things are made entirely of other things and aren't independent self-entities if any one 'thing' in the universe changes then everything changes because it all interpenetrates. This ...


5

In my understanding of the explanations I received: As many Buddhist concepts, "seeing things as they are" is a pointer to something happening in real life, but not necessarily in a sense we assume. Its meaning is more practical than strictly technical. Most of the time we are "in our heads". We have so many preconceptions, thoughts, and inner chatter ...


5

What is the connection between time and impermanence ? Are they different terms for the same thing ? The two are very different concepts. Time can be thought of as the conceptualization of experience as a sequence of events. First this happens then this. Past, present, and future. Impermanence is a separate concept describing the fleeting nature of ...


4

There is a convolution of meanings for dukkha which depends on context. One translation for dukkha is "unsatisfactoriness". Of course, it is not stated there is no feeling of satisfaction or pleasure born of impermanent things, as that would be absurd. I just ate a big sandwich and I can tell you I don't feel hungry, I feel satisfied with respect to hunger....


4

This is something you cannot force. Any form of force is based on craving or aversion hence you loose the balance of your mind. Through meditation you can realize "impermanence, suffering and non-self" at an experiential level. This is not a concept of thought or notion of it.


4

Contemplating will not take you all the way as there will be a perception or notional residue. You can start with it and make efforts to see the phenomena relating to the aggregates arising and passing. This will get you to the final goal as long as you do this with equanimity and non clinging and craving. For further details see Girinananda Sutta. ...


4

My attempts: First of all on interference which means action: "'I am the owner of my actions (kamma), heir to my actions, born of my actions, related through my actions, and have my actions as my arbitrator. Whatever I do, for good or for evil, to that will I fall heir'... "A disciple of the noble ones considers this: 'I am not the only one who is owner ...


4

As I said here, each of the Three Marks (Transience, Dukkha, Corelessness) produces a surprising effect when it is fully accepted: Fully accepting Transience brings a surprising sense of timeless peace and even a sense of stability as you get fully established in the momentary "eternal now". Fully accepting Dukkha brings a surprising sense of contentment ...


4

No phantom, no... The Diamond Sutra in Classical Chinese, wherein one of the verses instantly enlightened the 6th Patriarch Huineng, the corresponding verse to your quote is this: 一切有為法,如夢幻泡影,如露亦如電,應作如是觀。 This beautiful verse was done by this guy with his league of national selected translators: Kumarajiva is held by some Great Buddhist Masters as ...


4

All conditioner have 3 sub-characteristics (upāda[jāti], ṭhiti[jarā], and bhaṅga[maraṇa]) according to the description of 5 aggregates and 12 dependent originations. Saṅkhāra means cause of effects. This is conditioner aggregate of dependent origination. Saṅkhata means effect of causes. This is conditioned aggregate of dependent origination. Because ...


3

There are a few things which come to mind that Buddhism may say about your current spiritual path; Surely, the practices you have described will bring you some beneficial results. But without proper insight, guided by the Noble Eightfold path, they will not lead you to liberation from old age, suffering, and death. And this is evident by the way in which you ...


3

Living is a consequence of birth. Everything is unstable, unsatisfying and out of control because of birth. Birth is a consequence of not knowing what is suffering, what is the cause of suffering, what is the end of suffering and what is the way leading to the end of suffering. If everything in unstable, unsatisfying and out of control then what is the ...


3

Isn't the 'point of life' meant to be a journey to stability, satisfaction and self control? There's no "meant to be" in life. It's not written in the stars that you must do this or that. But you can follow the noble 8 fold path and attain stability and satisfaction while you live. If everything in unstable, unsatisfying and out of control Everything ...


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