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Buddhist meditation is not clinging to (i.e., not getting infatuated about) experienced phenomena. Last year I experienced samadhi, full state of awareness. Mind's thoughts stopped for days and I can't describe with feelings and words the complete experience. This is a type of samadhi. Samadhi is the absence of thoughts, just like an orange is ...


7

Samatha is tranquility meditation, meditating on a stable object with the objective of reaching calm states/jhanas. Samadhi is concentration. The Buddha's teachings of the eightfold noble path are divided into three categories; sila (morality), samadhi (concentration), and panna (wisdom/understanding). Samadhi is the meditation portion of the Buddha's ...


7

The Suttas usually define Samma-Samadhi as the four jhanas, but in some Suttas it gives a different explanation. For example, in the Mahacattarisa Sutta the Buddha said: The Blessed One said: "Now what, monks, is noble right concentration with its supports & requisite conditions? Any singleness of mind equipped with these seven factors — right ...


7

The essential difference is that in Buddhist meditation, at some point one uses one's mind to actively examine and investigate one's direct experience and to realize it's nature that way. This is the seventh factor of the Noble Eightfold path, Right Mindfulness, Samma-Sati. It is described in the Sattipatthana Sutta like this: "There is the case where ...


5

Nibbana is actually best understood as the cessation of suffering. The lakkhanadicatuka for nibbana is as follows (minus proximate cause because it is uncaused): It has peace as its characteristic. Its function is not to die; or its function is to comfort. It is manifested as the signless; or it is manifested as non- diversification. -- Path Of ...


5

When you breath be mindful of the start to end of the in and out breath. For each breath in and out breath be mindful of whether your mind wandered away during this time. Also note the length of the breath in and out breath. When scanning the body keep your concentration anchored on the breath and sensation on the base of the nose as well. If your mind ...


5

Phalasamapatti is a meditative state in which a person is absorbed in Nibbana itself. In this attainment there is a special kind of consciousness present called Lokuttara-citta. In contrast to this, in Nirodhasamapatti there is no consciousness at all. In Chapter 8 section 42 of the Abhidhammatha Sangaha it describes it like this: Having proceeded, thus, ...


5

Just to add to what Robin has said and answer your last question. "..are the underlying concepts related if you consider the Pali origins of the words i.e. do they have similar roots in the language?" Samadhi (Sanskrit: समाधि, ...), also called samāpatti, in Buddhism, ... is meditative absorption, attained by the practice of Jhana. In samadhi the mind ...


4

Both Mediation and Counselling can help. Talking about something can help you lighten your mind. Similarly meditation can help your reduce stress. But it is best to keep them independent without having spill over from one form of perspective to the other when you meet the respective people / crowd. If there is any perspective which contradicts the other, ...


4

Yes, concentrate on the sensation of the breath and nothing else. This will develop samadhi & but also vipassana because the breath is impermanent. While samadhi is developed, seeing clearly the impermanence (appearance, disappearance, appearance, disappearance) of each breath is vipassana. Thus the primary goal is to develop samadhi but a side ...


4

There are no 3 realms of Samadhi(Jhana). The jhanas have nothing to do with sensual desire. First four jhanas lead to birth in fine material realms. The last four lead to immaterial realms. One-pointeness by definition is pointed at one object. At that moment all sensual desires are subdued. But it is possible to get in and out of the Jhanic states ...


4

So... what was it, where it came from and why? What you have described sounds very much like the experience of Udayabbaya ñana or the knowledge of Arising and Passing Away. You can search for these terms and figure out more about this. You can also refer to this description of this stage by Daniel Ingram. As to where it came from, only you can answer that ...


4

The forerunner of the path is right view (MN117) and basically this means that you must understand something about Buddhism correctly before starting to practise. However, the rest of the practice of the Noble Eightfold Path is not sequential. It's rather, iterative. Here are some metaphors. When you first learn to drive a car, do you learn how to start ...


4

As far as I understand, one of the main purposes of the eight factor of the Path (samma samadhi) is to clean the mind from impurities. All factors of the N8P have the same purpose, they just operate on the different levels of coarseness. Their purpose is to first reduce and then completely eliminate creation of causes for the arising of dukkha. Generally ...


4

If I sit dow on the cushion for a moment, that's momentary samatha. Samatha is simply calmimg. It can take place anywhere. Samatha can lead to samadhi, but the two are by no means identical. It would be akin to equating the ingredients to a fully baked cake.


3

What the venerable means is that, according to the abhidhamma, magga and phala are both types of appana samadhi, not that all appana samadhi is magga and phala (which would be silly anyway, because magga and phala themselves are distinct from each other). At the moment of enlightenment, one enters into a type of appana samadhi called "lokuttara samadhi&...


3

Jhana is more than just the giving up of the five senses. Each of the jhanas is the result of very strong samadhi, and has specific factors that go along with it. For example, the first jhana has five factors: rapture, pleasure, initial application of mind, sustained application of mind, and oneness of mind. As one goes deeper into the second jhana, one ...


3

My question: When sitting shall we use a short sentence? Like: Death is inevitable. I am a mortal being. Like me all beings in samsara will face death when the time comes. Hence, we must transform our minds in accordance with the Dhamma. Yes.Short sentences like this helps the mind to focus on a theme/truth.It helps the mind penetrate its meaning. Is there ...


3

Different lineages / teachers would advice on this differently. My answer is based on what I picked from different teachers. Before doing metha best to to do a bit of breath meditation and insight meditation. Come to the stage that you have Piti or Passaddhi or at least you feel comfortable. Then wish that other share your peace and happiness. Keep wishing ...


3

Firstly to my understanding Sila is very important part of a meditation practice. It purify the morality and ready your for the meditation. If you have troubles with the meditation, I think the fist step is to start with Sila. Try to keep five precepts or the ten precepts. Without Sila, you cannot success with your meditation practice as it is the first ...


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'Samadhi' generically means 'collectedness' or 'concentration'. The Pali states there are two types of concentration, namely, 'right' & 'wrong': In one of right concentration, wrong concentration is abolished... MN 117 'Right concentration' is defined as concentration that has seven supporting & requisite factors: Any singleness of ...


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Samma Samadhi (right concentration) is a specific word in Buddhism to describe form realm and no form realm in conjunction with noble eight fold path. (please note Samma or Right) If you take only the word concentration it could well be applicable to the realm of desire as well. We all (every mind moment) have one-pointedness when we concentration on any ...


3

While I have never had such an experience that lasted for days, I have had some rather zen moments upon reaching epiphanies during contemplative thought. I think the longest was about 15 minutes long and happened when I realized the true nature of the universe. Again, not during meditation but during a period of "focused unfocusing". I would simply relax, ...


3

Develop concentration, monks. A concentrated monk discerns things as they actually are present. Samādhiṃ, bhikkhave, bhāvetha. Samāhito, bhikkhave, bhikkhu yathābhūtaṃ pajānāti Seeing things (pajānāti) is the terrority of wisdom (panna indriya), similar to seeing the signs, traffic, bends, dangers & safety in a road while driving a motor car in the rain....


3

I'm here burning the mid-night oil for the bounty!! :)))) Unfortunately I wasn't able to find the corresponding Agama Text, else it would be more clear, to me at least. However, Samadhi normally remained as "Samadhi" (三昧/三摩地) in Chinese, not translated, despite the rich knowledge of meditation inherited from the Daoist understanding what's going on in the ...


3

There is definitely a lot of confusion about Jhanas. In general, Buddhism has always been infamous for its lack of trust to teachers, texts, and interpretations - hence traditional obsession with "that one guy in the mountains who actually got it". The last two centuries' increased interest to Pali Canon apparently comes from the same doubts that give rise ...


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Yes some texts of the pali canon have parallels in what people call the (chinese) agamas. The links for the agamas is here: Where can I find the Chinese Canon Agama in English translation? Some people compare the agamas and the nikayas: The Fundamental Teachings of Early Buddhism -- A comparative study based on the Sutranga portion of the Pali Sarpyutta-...


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