12

As it was explained to me, we must master the coarse before we can master the subtle, and we must master the subtle before we can attain first-hand direct vision of Dharma. In this vein, during a single meditation session we must first work with the body, then work with the feelings, then work with the mind, and only then the insight meditation can happen ...


11

Steps differ by every teaching lineage. But a basic outline would look like this: Focus on the breath and recognize it as breath, without the thought, this is me, this is mine, this is what I am, this is good, this is bad, etc. If the mind wanders from the breath, acknowledge the thought in some system of categorizing objects that arise in the experience. ...


11

It is more gentle than that. Consider the first tetrad of anapanasati: Breathing in long, he discerns, 'I am breathing in long'; or breathing out long, he discerns, 'I am breathing out long.' Or breathing in short, he discerns, 'I am breathing in short'; or breathing out short, he discerns, 'I am breathing out short.' He trains himself, 'I will breathe in ...


8

You can feel anyone of them, but you have to use one of them for whole your meditation. I prefer breath. First you have to notice that you are inhaling when inhale and you have to notice that you are exhaling when you exhale. When you do that you may feel lot of things: pain in legs, scratches, mosquito bite like feelings. Just ignore them at once and ...


8

welcome! Generally, from Buddhism standpoint, meditation is not practiced for the sake of mystical experiences. In vipassana exercises, whatever sensation is felt, it's supposed to be observed, we are not supposed to be overwhelmed by it. In general, arbitrary sensations and imaginations are not to be stimulated. And as importantly, awareness should be ...


7

According my understanding Anapana Sati meditation is consists of several steps depending on your level. Found this page written by Most Ven. Nauyane Ariyadhamma Mahathera (who is one of the best meditation teacher according to me) could be helpful to you. It is quite lengthy one, but please read through for better understanding. In the article Ven ...


7

Just breath naturally. Controlling the breath is a different practice all together called Pranayama, and that is generally a Hindu practice. In Anapanasati, the breath shouldn't be controlled or forced but will slowly calm down all on its own. Eventually breathing becomes very slow and shallow, but in order to get there you have to learn to let go and let ...


7

From the Anapanasati Sutta "Mindfulness of in-&-out breathing, when developed & pursued, is of great fruit, of great benefit. Mindfulness of in-&-out breathing, when developed & pursued, brings the four frames of reference to their culmination. The four frames of reference, when developed & pursued, bring the seven factors for ...


6

The three characteristics are not meant to be understood through analysis; they are meant to be understood through direct realization (paññā). Once you truly see anatta for yourself, the next moment is the realization of nibbana. So there is no reason or benefit in seeking out this knowledge intellectually; it has to come by itself through mindfulness. “...


6

Re: mind feeling "very slow", "very slow to think of anything" -- when someone tells you something, can you reply immediately without thinking? That's a sign of good meditation. If your "very slow to think of anything" just means you are going around basically without thoughts, and you can respond to anything spontaneously with no blockages / no doubts - ...


6

The only time I've seen the heart-beat mentioned in a similar context, is when Trungpa Rinpoche discussed beginner-level practice: ...Usually hinayana-level student works with reality using exclusively phenomenological methods. He pays attention to his heart-beat, he watches his breathing, controls his posture and gait, how he eats, how drinks water etc......


6

The Wings to Awakening by Thanissaro Bhikkhu, on page 83 says, There is the case where a monk—having gone to the wilderness, to the foot of a tree, or to an empty building—sits down folding his legs crosswise, holding his body erect and setting mindfulness to the fore [parimukham: in the Abhidhamma, this is translated literally as “around the mouth”;...


5

All these experiences you get are due to fabrications. You should actively calm the fabrication. To do that: If you have a pleasant / unpleasant sensation somewhere bring it to your attention for a while - initially just bringing it to your attention will not make it go away but later stages it will just pass away When you mind wanders a way just before ...


5

He trains himself to breathe in sensitive to mental processes, and to breathe out sensitive to mental processes. (Cittasaṅkhārapaṭisaṃvedī assasissāmīti sikkhati. Cittasaṅkhārapaṭisaṃvedī passasissāmīti sikkhati.) He trains himself to breathe in sensitive to the mind, and to breathe out sensitive to the mind. (Cittapaṭisaṃvedi assasissāmīti sikkhati. ...


5

I assume that by rapture and bliss you mean the Pali words Piti and Sukha. Piti and Sukha are supposed to be comfortable and pleasant states of mind that arise whenever the mind is sufficiently calm, abiding in itself. However, these states have degrees of maturity, and they are not always conventionally pleasant. Diarrhea or sensations of ants crawling for ...


5

My oxygenation depletes, which seems to manifest as a slight loss of consciousness That does not seem common/normal -- I'm not a doctor though. Maybe it helps if, instead of focusing on breathing instructions (which might be problematic in this case), get enough information about what exactly is to be accomplished (and work your way towards it). ...


5

Hmmmm... interesting. Try this: do controlled breathing for a dozen breaths (count breaths on fingers and do a moderately-slow deliberate breath-ins and breath-outs), then for a dozen breaths let the breathing happen on auto-pilot (keep counting on fingers. I assume you have twelve fingers LOL). When you breathe deliberately you can't possibly NOT notice ...


5

If "slow to think of anything" means less distracted thoughts then that's good. But if that means your overall awareness/mindfulness decreases instead of increases then you might want to check your meditation technique. A nice effect of meditation is a decrease of the Five Hindrances: desire, ill-will, sloth/torpor, restlessness/worry, and doubt. (ref: The ...


5

There are a few mental cultivation techniques which involve breathing. E.g. there is Paranayama which pre-dates Buddhism. Here you do try to regulate the breath. In Anapana there is no regulation of the breath. Hence you do not breath out and try to rain in that state. (It is also suggested that one breathes out and remains in this state for a moment, to ...


5

The focus of this meditation is breath. Keep coming back to that. I recommend you seek out some in-person meditation instruction - it will really help your meditation.


4

This is a bit technical, but shows the positive effects from meditating in some key hormones we produce related to health and stress. I was discussing it with my girlfriend (she is endocrinologist and not buddhist) and she was quite surprised with it. If you want you can skip to the end of the text to see the conclusion " Previous studies of the ...


4

MN62 Maha-Rahulovada Sutta is one of them. "[1] Breathing in long, he discerns, 'I am breathing in long'; or breathing out long, he discerns, 'I am breathing out long.' [2] Or breathing in short, he discerns, 'I am breathing in short'; or breathing out short, he discerns, 'I am breathing out short.' [3] He trains himself, 'I will breathe in ...


4

The three characteristics are very deep and profound subjects, and often our understanding of them is very superficial. For example, people often think that they understand impermanence because they understand it to mean that all conditioned things will eventually end, when in fact impermanence means much more than that. In order to see the three ...


4

How can one see suffering in the breath? Is a personal opinion/answer OK? There are different types of dukkha and I think you can see aspects of any/all of these in breathing. Birth: baby's first breath, associated with life (and crying and a whole unsatisfactory life ahead) Sickness, old age, death: you're dying, and you die when you can't breathe ...


4

When in meditation, you will pass through different psychic experiences. Here are some points: I would suggest trying meditating on a chair so that your feet are on the ground. If you feel panic or excitement rising, feel the soles of your feet. This will help you get grounded. Feel the sensation on different parts of your body. Learn to rest in the ...


4

Boredom is a sign of restlessness. If you're bored, you want to try to do something else. You're not contented with the present moment. Please read this essay on the five hindrances to meditation by Ajahn Brahmavamso. However, if you're falling asleep or cannot focus, then that's sloth and torpor (quoted below from essay). Since you have already commented ...


4

It really doesn't matter which location you meditate on. The only big difference between the two is that the movement of the abdomen is a very apparent thing while the movement near the nostrils is much more subtle and harder to catch. The thing that determines if you are practicing Vipassana-Bhavana versus Samatha-Bhavana isn't the location of what you are ...


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