7

Generally speaking it is difficult to compare assertions made about the mind from different cultures many centuries apart. For example the Theravādins invented the bhavaṇgacitta for a specific purpose. There is a fundamental problem in Buddhist philosophy. Pratītyasamutpāda tells us that conditions must be present for effects to manifest (imassmim sati ...


6

Does hell exist in Buddism? Yes it does. It is a destination in which you mental state is painful and also painful mental states are sometimes called hell. Hell is mentioned in Bala Pandita Sutta. Painful mental states are compared to hell in Patala Sutta It also creats a machanism of punishment for not believing in the religion as well. Buddhism is ...


5

Let's separate this out. If you watch a recording of a crime on a website, does it impact the victim of the crime? Not in itself. It DOES give a "view" to the video, and thus you are, in a sense, giving your tacit support to the recording, and publishing, of the event. THAT is, for me, the reason not to watch such events, as far as the world impact is ...


5

There is no samatha jhana nor is there vipassana jhana mentioned in the suttas, I may have missed it! There are the 4 rupa jhanas mentioned with each containing various jhana factors and 4 arupa jhanas. IMHO, the distinction is made to rationalise some meditation practices which dispense with the development of jhanas as a necessary step. Vipassanā jhanas ...


5

Lokavipatti Sutta on the eight worldly winds: Monks, these eight worldly conditions spin after the world, and the world spins after these eight worldly conditions. Which eight? Gain, loss, status, disgrace, censure, praise, pleasure, & pain. These are the eight worldly conditions that spin after the world, and the world spins after these eight worldly ...


4

In mindfulness, we try to stay in the present moment, being aware of what we are doing and experiencing right here and right now. For the most part, the things that upset us are things that happened in the past, even if the past was just 5 minutes ago. Dwelling on the past would be outside of mindfulness. A great dhamma talk I've read on this subject is ...


3

No, they are not the same. Bhavanga is the most basic type of consciousness there is. It only has the factors that are common to all forms of consciousness, so it is totally blank. Mostly the Bhavanga is the state of mind that the mind defaults to in the tiny increments between the other mindstates, and also during what we would call complete ...


3

Ask A Monk: Samatha Jhana, Vipassana Jhana says (if I paraphrase properly), Samatha Jhana (e.g. concentrating on a white disk) cannot lead to insight because it's concentration on a conception (e.g. on the colour "white"). Samatha Jhana involves focus on something stable, but if you focus on something stable then you won't see "impermanent, suffering, and ...


3

If you read Pali suttas, you will see how Buddha says times and again, that people's opinion about a person is in large degree a reflection of person's virtue. Basically, human ethics and Buddha-Dharma both stem from the same Reality or Truth of how things work, so naturally there is a large overlap. Things that are considered shameful by society are, for ...


3

the key word is 'habitually looked' meaning one develops a strong habit. these stain the mind almost as though taking possession or control of it. prior to that is the unskillful perception arising from greed and delusions. prior to that is normal observation of beauty which is fine here but can easily become deluded. that is the way most of us practice, ...


3

Ven. Pa Auk Sayadaw explains here that clinging leads to suffering, and in this case, this includes clinging to family members, clinging to their beauty, clinging to the beauty of possessions etc. Being worried or concerned or obsessed about one's family members or their health, wealth, looks, possessions, career, future etc. are different expressions of ...


2

The confusion arise because the Burmese use vipassana to mean the method of meditation as taught by mahasi sayadaw. It is also used by those in the vipassana/goenka tradition/movement. These teachers discourage the practise of jhana. To have an understanding of jhana, you need to look at teachers from other traditions eg Ayya Khema, Ajahn Brahm etc. As ...


2

It would be useful to be very precise about what we mean by "pride" and "shame". Wikipedia mentions these relevant terms from the Theravada Abhidharma tradition: The unwholesome mental factors (akusala cetasikas) include: Ahirika - lack of shame or disgust for doing evil Anottappa - disregard for consequence, lack of shame for consequences Māna - conceit ...


2

Yes, hell exists in Buddhism as a literal real place as real as this world we live in, but there many hellish worlds and they are temporary (though many can last for extremely long time-periods). In reality the concept of hell might have originated in Buddhism because early Hinduism does not seem to have the concept nor does early Judaism or the majority of ...


2

It is possible that our “dream world” could be a window to our “mind plane”. Our past memories of even past lives could live within us in the “näma thalaya” or the “mind plane”. It is not storage in a physical device like a tape. Mind plane is devoid of any material things, it is all “näma“. It can be thought of as in a “different dimension” - this mind ...


2

31 Planes of existence coming together is one universe. There are infinite similar universes according to the Abhidhamma. This may be similar to multiverse but unlike in Sci Fi there are no duplicates of beings and duplication of events as per my understanding. Generally rebirth is within the universe but there are times beings can be reborn in intergalactic ...


2

Related to Andrei Volkov's answer, I don't think we need to tie supra-mundane phenomena (chakras, etc) into our explanation of why this happens. However, in a Buddhist sense, this is very relevant and related to how the concept of self is formed. Because what we perceive as the self is not a "true inherent fact" and is, in fact, a dependent and co-arising ...


2

Paying respect or veneration is an act of acknowledging greatness in a person. It has nothing to do with ego. But it can lead to ego if the recipient isn't mindful. On the other hand, if one's actions are directed by one's craving towards the joy that arises when one receives respect, it is very likely that ego is involved. if a warrior fights a battle to ...


2

As meditators, our job is to be aware or knowing as much as we can through out our daily life. And like it or not, we can't live our lives without fabricating. Right now, as you read this, your cognitive mind is fabricating. Otherwise, you can't understand these words. However, I understand how fabrication can lead to a lot of problems. So what can we do? ...


1

Sometimes yes, sometimes no. It depends on the circumstances. Sometimes shame and remorse can guide you to do skillful actions. Sometimes it can guide you to do unskillful actions.


1

I suppose it's part of a skillful response to unskillful action. Conversely, "shameless" is usually portrayed as undesirable. The response to skillful virtue is said to be "lack of remorse".


1

Not a Buddhist answer, but I think in psychology this is called "mirroring" and happens when we subconsciously try to "fit in" - i.e. when we feel insecure because we come from different background, and so we're trying to be like the other.


1

Satipattana meditation is what you should practice. If you are feeling proud, simply note it until it goes away. Ex: Proud... proud... proud... or expecting... expecting... expecting... or thinking... thinking... thinking... If you start to get worried, do the same: worrying... worrying.. worrying... You just need to keep noting using a word that best ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible