7

Generally speaking it is difficult to compare assertions made about the mind from different cultures many centuries apart. For example the Theravādins invented the bhavaṇgacitta for a specific purpose. There is a fundamental problem in Buddhist philosophy. Pratītyasamutpāda tells us that conditions must be present for effects to manifest (imassmim sati ...


5

Does hell exist in Buddism? Yes it does. It is a destination in which you mental state is painful and also painful mental states are sometimes called hell. Hell is mentioned in Bala Pandita Sutta. Painful mental states are compared to hell in Patala Sutta It also creats a machanism of punishment for not believing in the religion as well. Buddhism is ...


5

There is no samatha jhana nor is there vipassana jhana mentioned in the suttas, I may have missed it! There are the 4 rupa jhanas mentioned with each containing various jhana factors and 4 arupa jhanas. IMHO, the distinction is made to rationalise some meditation practices which dispense with the development of jhanas as a necessary step. Vipassanā ...


5

Lokavipatti Sutta on the eight worldly winds: Monks, these eight worldly conditions spin after the world, and the world spins after these eight worldly conditions. Which eight? Gain, loss, status, disgrace, censure, praise, pleasure, & pain. These are the eight worldly conditions that spin after the world, and the world spins after these eight worldly ...


5

It sounds like "equanimity", which is a normal result of meditation.


4

Ven. Yuttadhammo has written an interesting post about this topic on his weblog Truth Is Within. The post is called "Mahasi Sayadaw on Jhana". Here is a quote from the section: "First Absorption and Conceit": “Cunda, I will tell you about the cause of misconception and conceit in connection with the practice of meditation. Among my disciples, there are ...


4

The Pali scriptures say the antidote for envy is to practise 'mudita', which is to be happy for the happiness & success of others. The phrase for the practise/recollection of mudita is: "may all beings not be parted from the good fortune they have attained".


4

In mindfulness, we try to stay in the present moment, being aware of what we are doing and experiencing right here and right now. For the most part, the things that upset us are things that happened in the past, even if the past was just 5 minutes ago. Dwelling on the past would be outside of mindfulness. A great dhamma talk I've read on this subject is ...


4

Let's separate this out. If you watch a recording of a crime on a website, does it impact the victim of the crime? Not in itself. It DOES give a "view" to the video, and thus you are, in a sense, giving your tacit support to the recording, and publishing, of the event. THAT is, for me, the reason not to watch such events, as far as the world impact is ...


3

No, they are not the same. Bhavanga is the most basic type of consciousness there is. It only has the factors that are common to all forms of consciousness, so it is totally blank. Mostly the Bhavanga is the state of mind that the mind defaults to in the tiny increments between the other mindstates, and also during what we would call complete ...


3

I believe what you are mentioning is called the "Eight Worldly Dhammas": "These conditions are inconstant & impermanent. Gain and Loss Pleasure and Pain Praise and Blame Fame and Disrepute (status/disgrace)" Ven. Yuttadhammo also writes about them in his book "Lessons In Practical Buddhism" in the chapter: Dangers, p. 12-24. Here ...


3

Ask A Monk: Samatha Jhana, Vipassana Jhana says (if I paraphrase properly), Samatha Jhana (e.g. concentrating on a white disk) cannot lead to insight because it's concentration on a conception (e.g. on the colour "white"). Samatha Jhana involves focus on something stable, but if you focus on something stable then you won't see "impermanent, suffering, and ...


3

If you read Pali suttas, you will see how Buddha says times and again, that people's opinion about a person is in large degree a reflection of person's virtue. Basically, human ethics and Buddha-Dharma both stem from the same Reality or Truth of how things work, so naturally there is a large overlap. Things that are considered shameful by society are, for ...


2

It would be useful to be very precise about what we mean by "pride" and "shame". Wikipedia mentions these relevant terms from the Theravada Abhidharma tradition: The unwholesome mental factors (akusala cetasikas) include: Ahirika - lack of shame or disgust for doing evil Anottappa - disregard for consequence, lack of shame for consequences Māna - conceit ...


2

Yes, hell exists in Buddhism as a literal real place as real as this world we live in, but there many hellish worlds and they are temporary (though many can last for extremely long time-periods). In reality the concept of hell might have originated in Buddhism because early Hinduism does not seem to have the concept nor does early Judaism or the majority of ...


2

Related to Andrei Volkov's answer, I don't think we need to tie supra-mundane phenomena (chakras, etc) into our explanation of why this happens. However, in a Buddhist sense, this is very relevant and related to how the concept of self is formed. Because what we perceive as the self is not a "true inherent fact" and is, in fact, a dependent and co-arising ...


2

The other answer on this site was fine in its essence, spirit, purpose & intent. There is the unwholesome 'remorse' or 'guilt' (kukkucca), which is a hindrance; and there is the wholesome 'sense of shame' (hiri), which is a virtue and one of the five gates to Dhamma. As the other answer on this site implied shame towards unskilful deeds is for a ...


2

Paying respect or veneration is an act of acknowledging greatness in a person. It has nothing to do with ego. But it can lead to ego if the recipient isn't mindful. On the other hand, if one's actions are directed by one's craving towards the joy that arises when one receives respect, it is very likely that ego is involved. if a warrior fights a battle to ...


1

31 Planes of existence coming together is one universe. There are infinite similar universes according to the Abhidhamma. This may be similar to multiverse but unlike in Sci Fi there are no duplicates of beings and duplication of events as per my understanding. Generally rebirth is within the universe but there are times beings can be reborn in intergalactic ...


1

How would hell be completely existent in every school of Buddhism if it was a tool added to control society? If something was added not everyone would accept it resulting in various schools as we see now but this hasn't occurred with Hell so it isn't a later addition.


1

Not a Buddhist answer, but I think in psychology this is called "mirroring" and happens when we subconsciously try to "fit in" - i.e. when we feel insecure because we come from different background, and so we're trying to be like the other.


1

Satipattana meditation is what you should practice. If you are feeling proud, simply note it until it goes away. Ex: Proud... proud... proud... or expecting... expecting... expecting... or thinking... thinking... thinking... If you start to get worried, do the same: worrying... worrying.. worrying... You just need to keep noting using a word that best ...


1

from my own experience with mindfulness meditation over past 10 months (and a slightly longer interest in zen buddhism and Jungian psychology), I can understand what is your struggle. Accepting and understanding my own self pity, hatered and anger was a big step for me, yet it has opened me to a completely new set of aspects of my personality that were ...


1

Hell exists in Buddhism but not the kind of you normally you think of as hell (examples would be hell in conventional Christianity. *Ancient Christianity/Gnosis is different story) In fact, you are in hell right now. Heaven and hell exists within you at the same time but you just don't realize. If your life is guided by something imaginary and not own your ...


1

It is the heart that is important. In other words, your intention while you are watching a crime on TV, for example. Do you enjoy it and reinforce the idea that crime is justified to a very strong degree? Or do you watch it from an apathetic perspective (the opposite extreme). There are so many videos, literature, etc, that depict violence or crime as ...


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