9

According to Buddhism, even when I am typing these words and seeing the screen, there is no one there. The 'person' isn't an existing thing, it is just a label we put on things to describe how things work, and the label of person refers to a large group of many different mental and physical processes. If there is ultimately no self, does that mean that all ...


8

There's an article on that subject Dhamma and Non-duality by Bhikkhu Bodhi. The following is basically all direct quotes from that article, except very summarized (I'm extracting sentences and sentence fragments). Non-dual system For the Vedanta, non-duality (advaita) means the absence of an ultimate distinction between the Atman, the innermost self, and ...


8

From a Theravada perspective, there is absolute good and absolute bad. The 2 can exist mutually exclusively. Suffering is absolutely bad and the mind states that lead to suffering are absolutely bad. Nibbana is absolutely good and the mind states that lead to Nibbana are absolutely good. There is no suffering in Nibbana and there's no Nibbana in suffering....


7

If someone can realize Anatman then is this not basically the whole teaching? It's certainly a great step forward on the path, but it is not the whole teaching. This is the whole teaching. That was a joke! But seriously, there is no truly objective answer to your question. Anattā is just one slice of one of the many pies of Buddhism. As a "mark of ...


7

Generally speaking it is difficult to compare assertions made about the mind from different cultures many centuries apart. For example the Theravādins invented the bhavaṇgacitta for a specific purpose. There is a fundamental problem in Buddhist philosophy. Pratītyasamutpāda tells us that conditions must be present for effects to manifest (imassmim sati ...


6

My limited understanding is that 'I' never really was in the first place. That which never appeared cannot vanish. That which was never born cannot die. The cycle of birth and death is broken by truly realizing that the entire cycle is predicated on ignorance. Practice is the road to the eradication of ignorance, though doing good, avoiding evil and ...


6

One must be very careful with the idea that there is no self. This is not quite what the early Buddhist texts say. What they say is that when one examines one's experience (the five khandhas: form, sensations, perceptions, volitions and cognitions) one does not find a self, nor anything that belongs to a self (Alagaddupama Sutta, Majjhima Nikāya, Sutta no.22)...


5

No, anatta is not the key point of Buddhism, and Buddhism is not nondualism. That would be too easy ;) Shunyata, the Mahayana extrapolation of anatta principle, is getting closer. If I had to pick one point to explain it all, I would say TATHATA.


5

The Observer is the experience of being aware of myself. It feels like I am witnessing my own thoughts and actions. In Buddhism, "myself" as an entity would be a mind-object: a concept, something one conceived / imagined, which receives attention -- a 'self' is taught to not be in the range of actual experiences such as a touch, a smell or primitive mental ...


5

The original Buddhist teachings do not include a doctrine of non-duality. The Buddha's enlightenment came from ending craving & attachment rather than from ending dualistic perceptions & thoughts. Understanding good & bad for moral/social purposes is one kind of knowledge. Seeing & understanding the true nature of reality for liberation is ...


5

Good question. There are several schools of thought here. According to one, attainment of nonduality does leave the person with nothing else to be done. No goals, no ambitions. What follows from this is an idea that before a student is introduced to nonduality, they must be first taught discipline and a high-drive attitude, so by the time they attain non-...


4

Buddhism has many core principles which work as complete paths. However, like other projects, it helps to use a variety of techniques to cover all bases. The unifying principle in Buddhism is letting go of clinging to reduce suffering. Looking at some core Buddhist principles through this lens, you will see that each address clinging in a different -- yet ...


4

Nibbana isn't just something that happens after death, but can be experienced during meditation during fruition. The only difference between this Nibbana experienced in life and the Nibbana after the death of an Arahat is that in the case of the Arahat, they don't come out again. If you can experience Nibbana in this life as at least a sotapanna then you can ...


4

The practice of a bodhisatvva The entire practice of a bodhisattva is divided into six perfections, which are generosity, discipline, patience, effort, meditative concentration, and wisdom. In order to fulfill the hopes of others, it is very important to engage in the practice of generosity, which in turn should be strengthened by a strict observance ...


4

The way Buddha formulated it, anatta was a surprising solution to the impossible problem - change in your attitude, not just an intellectual understanding - just like you said. His argument went like this: dukkha happens because we try to rely on things which are unreliable -- therefore to achieve permanent Nirvana we need to try and find something which is ...


3

No, they are not the same. Bhavanga is the most basic type of consciousness there is. It only has the factors that are common to all forms of consciousness, so it is totally blank. Mostly the Bhavanga is the state of mind that the mind defaults to in the tiny increments between the other mindstates, and also during what we would call complete ...


3

The two traditions are different in that Mahayana uses a transformation process, that is, we try to "be" a bodhisattva which means incorporating their virtues and their mind. So we try to have a non-dualistic view. We don't get it in the beginning so we continue to refine our views. Question what do we do with hate and craving in Mahayana? In the Theravada (...


3

There is no not-others and there is no others. Buddhism teaches a nondual perspective beyond either extreme, beyond the dichotimization that is the habit of the intellect. There is not even that One because to mention that One is to already create a separateness. There is just is-ness. There is not even just is-ness because is-ness implies separation from ...


3

From Buddhist perspective, phenomenal (experiential) reality is dependently co-arisen phenomena. In other words, experience depends on convergence of a number of factors. Some of those factors are common across multiple cases of perception, and some are specific to an individual case of perception. To the extent that some factors are shared, realities are ...


3

Is the state of Nibbana the state of "not existing at all in any way" or is it nonexistence with benefits that are too deep to understand from the perspective of samsara? I think it's cessation, described in the third noble truth: no longer suffering because no longer clinging to that which is impermanent. Does the only "bliss" pertaining to Nibbana ...


3

In Theravada Buddhism the Abhidhamma Pitaka teaches that there are 2 kinds of realities, i.e. the conventional reality (sammuti sacca) and ultimate reality (paramattha sacca). Conventional reality consists of concepts and entities, e.g. a man, woman, animal, car, planet, galaxy etc. These do not really exist since they are merely concepts with no real point ...


3

As far as I know, Observer (kṣetra-jñaḥ - "the knower of the field [of experience]" or Vedagu - "the one who enjoys [the objects of senses]") is a Hindu concept. It's an ancient expression for the subject of experience, the spectator in the Cartesian Theater: The king said: ‘Is there, Nāgasena, such a thing as The Knower?’ [Nagasena:] ‘What is this,...


3

Original Pali Buddhism does not teach about 'non-dualism'. Instead, it teaches about 'voidness' (selflessness; sunnata). The world is empty...In what respect is it said that the world is empty? Insofar as it is empty of a self or of anything pertaining to a self: Thus it is said, Ananda, that the world is empty. SN 35.85 In a number of places, it ...


3

Yes it certainly is nondualistic, however Buddhism goes beyond simple nondualism, effectively assuming perfect loss of (attachment to) any form not just the illusion of "I". So you no longer hold position such as "everything is one" either. You don't even hold a position such as "everything is so" or "I should not hold on to any position". It's a complete ...


3

One short paper that compares and contrasts Vedanta and Buddhism is Acharya Mahayogi Sridhar Rana Rinpoche's essay "Madhyamika Buddhism vis-à-vis Hindu Vedanta". When we compare the Advaita Vedanta, especially as interpreted by Shankara and Madhyamika, whether be it the Svatantric from of Bhabya or Prasangic form of Candrakirti, the sharing of the same ...


3

Loving kindness(Metta) is a state of the mind that arises and vanishes. It's not something that exists. For loving kindness to arise, one should see the lovable nature of beings. It does not require suffering. On the other hand, compassion requires seeing the helplessness in those overwhelmed by suffering. Happiness is also a state of mind that arises and ...


3

Is dependent arising meant for us to understand the arising of suffering According to the Pali scriptures, yes. Refer to SN 12.2 or AN 3.61. or is it also meant to describe how phenomena in the outside World arises dependent on other conditions for instance how water and sun causes a flower to grow. No. The Buddha taught about suffering & its ...


3

There's a post here on that subject, which isn't long but difficult to summarise: The Dharma of Non-Duality In the first (main) part the author says: The word for "non-duality" is advaita The Buddha didn't use that term (because it was already used then to mean "union of soul with God") The Buddha did teach "non-duality" is many ways -- e.g. "neither self ...


2

The subtlety here is that understanding of this truth is not realization of this truth. I might have an experience of ego-shattering transcendence and yet, the very (next) moment, act selfishly out of long-worn old habits. The practice of realization is one of purification and ceasing to establish new roots for future suffering. In the Zen tradition we ...


2

Anatta is one of the 3 marks of existence. The others being; anicca and dukkha. The whole teaching is the "most" important. One cannot just take out a piece of the teaching. It does not work like that. The Noble Eightfold Path is a complete teaching that needs nothing to be added or removed from it. Sila, Samadhi, Panna. All groups are needed in order to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible