13

Thoughts are one of the six sense objects; there is no reason to think that they stop when one becomes an arahant. It is quite clear that both the Buddha and arahants did indeed have thoughts after becoming enlightened. E.g.: And the knowledge and vision arose in me: ‘Āḷāra Kālāma died seven days ago.’ I thought: ‘Āḷāra Kālāmaʹs loss is a great one. If he ...


7

If matter is just illusion I don't think that is Buddhist doctrine. I think that Buddhist doctrine is that we tend to view matter inappropriately or with ignorance. what is the origin of it I'm not sure it has an origin. That might be considered an unanswered question. Several suttas (e.g. this one) mention "inconstruable beginning", saying "A beginning ...


6

I think the problem stems from a desire to know the mechanistic workings of reality; e.g. how one thing affects or effects another, rather than simple that it does so. Buddhism is, for the most part, terribly devoid of explanations about the former, since it is ultimately a practical path. As the Buddha said time and again, Bhikkhus, both formerly and ...


6

In the Theravada (mostly in the abhidhamma and commentaries), "nāma" is used to describe those dhammas that are mental, i.e. the last four aggregates. Also, three of the four ultimate realities (nibbana is considered a nāmadhamma, though that's a bit of a technicality). e.g., in the Yāmaka: ye keci nāmā dhammā, sabbe te nāmamūlā? Whatever nāma ...


6

So lets say i am having ill will thoughts do i just replace those thoughts with loving kindness instead? Or if im experiencing sloth and torpor, do i just replace and abandon those thoughts with exertion and striving? Yes, that would be one way of dealing with the hindrances. This is the first method. If that does not work, one moves on to the second method ...


4

Anthony's definition of "inner monologue" is clear, but still no quite clear enough.What are these "unnecessary thoughts that normal people have" about? Assuming we agree that some of these are thoughts of future thoughts of past thoughts arising from conceiving "I am" The Arahant has none of these: Atītaṃ nānusocanti, nappajappanti nāgataṃ; ...


4

There is no Mind-Body problem in Buddhism. The relationship between body and mind is well described by the Buddha in form of e.g. the 5 aggregates i.e., materiality, feeling, perception, mental formations, consciousness and Dependent Origination. But not only is it well described, the Buddha teaches us to go and find out for ourselves through the practice ...


4

I don't understand the question. I just try to help. I write this answer by my guess the question's meaning. The past (vanished) moment does not "upload" anything to the moment which it affects. It just causes its effect to arise. However, the effects are able to arise as the same habit, e.g. same object and same feeling, because of Upanissaya Paccaya. The ...


3

This appears in the Najīratisutta ( Najīrati - What does not decay / what does not age; version in Sinhala and English). From what I have heard and learned in this context what is referenced as Nama is reputation and not the mind. E.g. the some historic people are long gone but they are still remembered for what they were.


3

The Mind-Body problem is based on a mistaken and non-empirical premise: that the world is “fundamentally physical.” Because every school of Buddhism that I’m aware of has avoided this error, it is hard to find any Buddhist explanations that address it in the terms of modern philosophy. As I understand it, all the various theories you refer to stemmed from ...


3

The word nāma is never used by itself to mean mind, but the reason for this is the word literally means name, so it would be very hard to tell when it is being used to mean mind and when it is being used to mean name. When it is used in the compound nāmarūpa however, the meaning is clear because it's being used as part of a set expression. There are other ...


3

The Buddha of Pali Canon held an evidently pragmatic position, never explicitly defining his view as idealistic or materialistic. He does speak of "this body" as "composed of the four properties, born of mother & father, fed on rice & porridge, subject to inconstancy". He also speaks of consciousness as "dependent on body" and therefore impermanent, ...


3

We know of no sutra directly bearing on the subject of time travel, although space travel to the akasha deva loka ("space world of shining ones") is frequently met with in both directions, Sakka to Earth and the Buddha and monastics to many "celestial" worlds [like the Buddha, Maha Moggallana, and other disciples going into near Earth orbit and battling a ...


2

Gautama never described an origin. Whether existence had a beginning or end was never defined. Some traditions have taken to saying "beginningless." So if mindstreams have a beginning, the Buddha never said so. The asker was either told that the answer was irrelevant to liberation (hence not worth answering) or that the question did not apply. The Pali ...


2

Cognitive Process in Buddhism: Paticca-samuppada Modern Science: Mental Modules come close to what the Buddha described. It was one of the topics in Robert Wright's course mentioned above.


2

On page 111 in What Buddhists Believe by Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda there is a short section about Nama-Rupa. Maybe it can help you out. Ven. K. Sri Dhammanda talks about the definition of both nama & rupa. He says: "... According to buddhism, life is a combination of mind (nama) and matter (rupa). Mind consists of the combination of sensations, ...


2

In case of the mind-sense(the stream of Bhavaangha cittas), the object received by the sense is a thought itself. There's no physical element involved. That's why Arupa beings only have the mind sense. 'Energy' is a concept. There's no such thing according to Buddhism. Even sunlight is said to be containing the pure octad. Anything physical is Rupa and the ...


2

Yes, this is a very Buddhist thing to say in a funeral. It sounds like a namarupa sort of thing. The form has changed but the name and memory(concepts of the deceased) stay the same. Concepts don't really die like with real ultimate moment by moment things, they never existed to begin with in the experiential world.


2

The world itself was not an illusion to the Buddha. Rather, given the true nature of experience - Anatta and Anicca, the actions of 'I' making or 'Mine' making facilitate the illusion of a Self, hence the arising of Dukkha. The issue of origin for any thing that lacks a Self, like this existence, is that the beginning doesn't make sense. At best the ...


2

In short: it doesn't matter. Why? Because drilling down on this topic will not free you from suffering. Instead, it may well create more.


2

In his commentary to Kamalashila's Stages of Meditation, His Holiness the Dalaï-Lama lists 5 types of causes: All those phenomena that are produced at some times but not others depend on causes and conditions, and they are of various types. Causes are of different types, such as (1) substantial cause, (2) direct cause, (3) indirect cause, (4) cause ...


2

Obviously, it's not really the "body" that is wiser, it is the non-conceptual mind which constitutes the underwater part of the iceberg the top of which we see as our conceptual mind. The question is, should we trust it? Generally speaking, in western culture the body with its instincts and emotions is seen as an animal - stupid and violent, while the ...


1

To explain it will take long long paragraph, but still not really explaining anything. To give some orientations relating to your question, first, you said "matter", what is matter? A duck, we say there is a duck (matter), it's shaped a duck-shape, yellow or green in colour, it quacks, it smells, it has soft downs, roasted duck tastes different from chicken. ...


1

There are six elements. 4 physicals(relate to Mass), space(relate to Dark matter) and consciousness(relate to time). “‘Bhikkhu, this person consists of six elements.’ So it was said. And with reference to what was this said? There are the earth element, the water element, the fire element, the air element, the space element, and the consciousness ...


1

PaticcaSamuppada is about how ignorance pollutes/taints the elements & senses leading to the creation of suffering rather than about how the elements & senses are physically or neurologically created, as shown in the following quote: To an uninstructed, run-of-the-mill person, touched by that which is felt born of contact with ignorance, craving ...


1

According to Theravada Buddhism, Right view (Samma Ditti) should eliminate both extreme ideologies( materialistic -"Everything exists" view and "Everything doesn't exist"). This is very clear per most of the suttas. For example. pls refer to Kaccayanagotta Sutta. Also if you could read Bhikku K Nanananda's Concept and Reality in Early Buddhist Thought that'd ...


1

Yes, the mind-body problem is NOT a problem - it an interaction between the mind and the body. I do agree with earlier yuttadhammo's comments and with the other similar comments. The mind and the body influence one another in one or another way. Mostly the mind governs the body. There are mounting evidence of how the mind affect the body. If you have a look ...


1

The evidence or proof your looking for won't come by using intellectual concepts or material tools. The mind-body relationship happens at extremly fast speeds, in the labratory of one's moment by moment experience, something like this: Eye consciousness(mind) makes contact with a rose that causes desire to have the rose(mind). That causes the arm to go ...


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