New answers tagged

0

A fool with a sense of his foolishness is — at least to that extent — wise.[the "teacher"] But a fool who thinks himself wise really deserves to be called a fool. [most of his follower] dhp


2

Shantideva’s work is among the most beautiful and profound pieces of writing ever composed on earth in any language. It is jaw dropping in its profound beauty and the author must have been an extraordinary Bodhisattva if not a fully accomplished enlightened being. Personally, I prefer to see it as the work of a fully and completely enlightened being. To me ...


0

Possibly related topics but from the Theravada tradition: What is the difference between 'compassion' and 'pity'? What is right gifting? How are 'conceit' and 'identity-view' not the same? I'm not sure what "negative thoughts" are -- though I know the term is used in pop psychology -- which teaches or uses "negative" as a ...


0

Buddhism and the "neuroscientific modern view" emphasize different things... Buddhism has an ethical focus and the Abhidhamma classifies mental states as being "ethically-neutral", "unwholesome" or "beautiful". On the other hand, the "neuroscientific modern view" focuses on observables/measurables such as neurons and dopamine. If you want to develop yourself ...


1

What are the benefits specific to seeing the mind as mental states, rather than as a physical substrate? I'm not convinced that buddhism sees the mind exclusively in terms of mental states, but rather taking both materialism and mental states into account. For instance, dependent origination details the relationship between physical properties and mental ...


Top 50 recent answers are included