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'Going to hell' in Buddhism is not like in Christianity, it is not a judgement. Ksitigharba went to hell, and is a bodhisattva. You should read https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism_and_sexual_orientation Stigma, and denying or silencing issues around sexuality, cause huge amounts of suffering, prevent reporting and accountability, and make many people's ...


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Buddhism deals with suffering and how to become permanently free from it. Superficial and conceptual things like sexuality are useless in that regard, hence the focus merely on ultimate reality.


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The recommendation is for lay persons to observe the Eight Precepts on Uposatha Days. The Eight Precepts are included in the Ten Precepts, thus the Ten Precepts conform to the above recommendation. So, there's no problem observing the Ten Precepts on Uposatha Days. It's just like the case where monks need not do more than what is required by the Vinaya. But ...


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You can find the Pali words on Sutta Central: ... saddho kāyassa bhedā paraṁ maraṇā sugatiṁ saggaṁ lokaṁ upapajjati ... To answer your question, I think the text has been correctly translated. The translated word “breaks” corresponds to "bhedā". For this context see notes from the PTS: "Abl. bhedā after the destruction or dissolution in ...


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My friend, you are "thinking too much"...:) "thinking too much" is a Volition in 5 aggregates, this is when our thinking is out of dhamma, out of 4NT, out of N8FP. Try to bring your thought back to knowing exactly what your body is doing, aware of what your body is doing and nothing else. Ask yourself "what am I doing now?" if ...


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Kamma forms when (1) there is intention, intention of ill will, intention of causing others to quarrel (2) you do it, you really speak in such (3) the result, the speak causing quarrel as it intended to be. ALL above 3 need to happen to form a bad kamma. Thus, say something you thought was true (with no bad intention) but turned out to be false due to ...


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From SN 42.3: When a warrior strives and struggles in battle, their mind is already low, degraded, and misdirected as they think: Yo so, gāmaṇi, yodhājīvo saṅgāme ussahati vāyamati, tassa taṁ cittaṁ pubbe gahitaṁ dukkaṭaṁ duppaṇihitaṁ: ‘May these sentient beings be killed, slaughtered, slain, destroyed, or annihilated!’ His foes kill him and finish him off, ...


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The commentary to Dhammapada 1 precisely addresses the topic of unintentionally killing insects: On one occasion, Thera Cakkhupala (who was blind) came to pay homage to the Buddha at the Jetavana monastery. One night, while pacing up and down in meditation, the thera accidentally stepped on some insects. In the morning, some bhikkhus visiting the thera ...


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Kamma is tied to volition, the precepts are there to establish minimum guidelines for "good" behaviour, but try to understand the why. As Dhammadhatu pointed out, the first precept relates to intentional killing, it exists to prevent actions based on hatred and ill-will, which generate bad kamma, i.e., more hatred and ill-will. If you are not ...


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No. When it comes to lying, bad karma is not related to the actual truthfulness of what was said. Rather, it comes from intention. Speaking the untruth intentionally is bad karma and a violation of one of the five precepts. Please see this answer for more details. From Nibbedhika Sutta: Intention, I tell you, is kamma. Intending, one does kamma by way of ...


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You should not say things which will turn out to be false or is false intentionally. However if you have said something which turned out to be false unintentionally then it is alright. Honesty and integrity are the hallmarks of the followers of Buddha. Sometimes a person is a pathological liar... he doesn’t know that he is lying... he believes that whatever ...


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First, a disclaimer: I cannot give assurance that this answer is found in Theravada Buddhism, as your question is tagged, nor am I answering the question in the title. I am answering the question you pose at the end of your description: “Why didn’t he analyze the statement when he said he would?” The Buddha said: “I will teach you a statement & its ...


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Those are two sentences. Perhaps the first is the statement and the second the analysis. Also in the Pali it's a single compound word: Mendicants, I shall teach you the analysis of a recitation passage. uddesavibhaṅgaṁ vo, bhikkhave, desessāmi. uddesa recitation, instruction; indication; brief indication, brief statement; summary exposition instructing, ...


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He did analyze it. His exposition was to return to his hut and simply move on without being externally or internally bound. This is very similar to the Zen story about kicking over the water jug. When Master Guishan was under Baizhang, he had the position of tenzo [cook]. Baizhang wanted to choose a master for Great Gui Mountain in the province of Konan. He ...


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There are certain reasons for being joyful. Including the ones which make you smile. Remembering Buddha and understanding him is a reason to smile. Buddha himself smiled when he remembered his past lives... Only in one sutta nobody smiled and that was MN1 where he explained root of all things...


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If I may bring forth an answer to my own question, I have found a passage in the suttas that may provide some useful information on the matter. In the sutta MN 81 With Ghaṭikāra it is said : So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was wandering in the land of the Kosalans together with a large Saṅgha of mendicants. Then the Buddha left the road, and at a ...


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From the MN 58 quote below, we see that the Buddha has a sense of proper time for saying things which are factual, true and beneficial. So, we can only surmise that the Buddha gave a statement without its detailed analysis, to give the monks time to think about his statement, before explaining to them the detailed analysis at a proper time, later. Why is ...


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Buddha said that it is not possible to understand 4 things, one of them was where a Buddha or Arahant goes 🙏 However, my feeling is that an Arahant state is like a child, pure in his heart, not identifying himself with a self, loving and feeling one with the whole universe, ready to help others without greed, aversion or craving... Like a child taught to ...


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