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Brother, The stages of enlightenment are dependant on cultivation. Attachments to circumstances of the generation are a means of describing or assessing the level of enlightenment attainment, So to answer your question brother, achieving stream entry can be done, however that is all dependent on the path taken to attain the Dharma of the individual in ...


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Nondual Direct Pointing Out such as given in Dzogchen or Zen can result in realizing no-self without meditation, for those who's beings are ready.


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The teachings to be passed on by Maitreya. As for the teachings of Maitreya Buddha, they are yet to be seen.


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You can find a Sinhala translation of the Mahaniddesa and a Sinhala translation of the Culaniddesa on SuttaCentral. Both were translated by A. P. de Zoysa. From there, you can copy and paste the Sinhala texts into Google Translate, and get it translated into English or another western language of your choice. For example, I managed to translate the first ...


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Tibetan Buddhism illustrates a progressive path through the Bardo Thodol (aka The Tibetan Book of the Dead, an explanation of what happens after we die) but one usually needs to extrapolate and re-interpret the strange symbolic imagery and correlate that with one's worldly experience. It is possible to intuit most of the Bardo Thodol if you have already been ...


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Other sects definitely have plenty of "stages", just not necessarily the same ones. For example in Tibetan Buddhism there's not just one text but a whole genre of texts called "Stages of the path" (usually shortened to Lamrim in Tibetan). These are not stages of meditation, rather it is the overall stages of insight and realization of the ...


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Chanting is incredibly common in Theravada Buddhism. I'm not sure exactly what would count as "chanting mantras," however. Mantra meditation is common, but it's usually silent. There are no "secret" procedures in Theravada. Monks aren't allowed to disclose certain things to lay people, but there wouldn't be any secret meditation ...


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Jhanas are 8 distinct states of concentration that build the basis for insight practice and ultimately Enlightenment. These 8 jhanas/dhyanas/samadhi do not encompass all the different states of concentration possible, just the key ones conducive to Enlightenment. So yes, sleep is a type of concentration/altered state and even has some factors shared with the ...


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Jhana is meditation, not sleep (including deep sleep). Sleep (including deep sleep) is not jhana. In meditation (including jhana states), one is conscious and aware. In sleep (including deep sleep), one is not conscious and not aware. If you're not conscious and not aware, then you're not in meditation.


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I've got a simple answer for you: Sleep is not a jhāna. The Buddha never says, not in Pāli not in Chinese not in Sanskrit, that sleep is a jhāna. Sleep is also not nibbāna. Sleep is also not nirodha. You just forget your dreams when you wake up and it seems like you were up to "nothing," but your mind was quite active despite you not remembering it....


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Alright I will answer this since we have ruled out the jhana that only leaves the realm of infinite space, infinite consciousness, nothingness, neither perception nor non perception and cessation of feeling and perception But we need to rule out the realm of nothingness and lower because there still exists desire there while in deep sleep none of even desire ...


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Then connection between sleeping and meditation is well explored in AN7.61. In this sutta, the Buddha advises Venerable Moggallāna on ways to avoid drowsiness, since drowsiness is hard to give up. AN7.61:2.1: “Are you nodding off, Moggallāna? Are you nodding off?” AN7.61:2.2: “Yes, sir.” AN7.61:2.3: “So, Moggallāna, don’t focus on or cultivate the ...


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'Nanadassana' can be 'knowledge & vision' of truth, per SN 56.11, as follows: As long as my true knowledge and vision about these four noble truths was not fully purified in these three perspectives and twelve respects, I didn’t announce my supreme perfect awakening in this world with its gods, Māras, and Brahmās, this population with its ascetics and ...


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Knowledge is the counterpart to ignorance of the Four Noble Truths of suffering, the origin of suffering, the cessation of suffering and the path that leads to the cessation of suffering. Vision varies according to the individual: SN35.245:1.1: Then one mendicant went up to another mendicant and asked, “Reverend, at what point is a mendicant’s vision well ...


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It's depending on the context. You should specify your Sutta for let us see the context. In 4th Patimokkha Rule 'janami passami' means just "(unwholesome) knowing". In some sutta "jānāmi" means "ñāṇa". In some sutta "passami/dassana/ditthi" means "(AriyamaggaSamma)Ditthi". In some sutta "passami/dassana/...


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In the Mahaparinibbana Sutta, the Buddha said he kept nothing hidden from his disciples. Yet in the Simsapa Sutta, the Buddha said he knew more than what he taught. So what didn't he teach? He did not teach anything that was not useful towards the goal of ending suffering, as you can see in the Parable of the Poisoned Arrow below. The Parable of the Poisoned ...


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Both is the top of 31 planes of existence. People there have longest life, however they are arising and vanishing more than trillion times per second as well, and they are going to die as well. They are not going to reborn in hell immediately, however they can reborn in hell the death after that reborn. No where one can be hidden from death. Sutta Pitaka ...


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The Buddha did not teach the perception of impermanence to all people. Higher Buddhism is not suitable for all people. Many Buddhists covert to Islam or Christianity.


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The fact that all things are impermanence just make me sad. How do I feel better? There's nothing to do. That's just how Samsara is. Everything that arises must end at some point. You can't change that. Trying to change anything will just cause more suffering. What we can/must do is to come to terms with change through meditation practice. Change is one of ...


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Seeing the truth of impermanence, one finds it sadly unsatisfying. Letting go of the unsatisfying, embrace the limitless. Meditate spreading a limitless heart full of love, compassion, rejoicing and equanimity. MN50:14.4: Come, all of you mendicants, meditate spreading a heart full of love to one direction, and to the second, and to the third, and to the ...


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This is exactly the topic discussed in the River Sutta. You created this mental concept of relationships with people around you, and you cling to it, assuming these relationships belong to you, i.e. belongs to the self. But these relationships are impermanent. If you cling to it, it will bring you suffering when these relationships change or end. The ...


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Not all impermanent relationships cause you sadness, doesn't it? You have clearly noticed joy taking place once a "bad" relationship end (like escaping from the fetters of drugs or alcohol). Can you remember of any of those? This could be a motivator for you to take your relationships fully, i.e., as they start, age, and die. On the positive side, ...


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That which impermanence appears to ,or that which speaks about impermanence. Is that changing ? Any kind of material form whatever, whether past, future, or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, inferior or superior, far or near, all material form should be seen as it actually is with proper wisdom thus: “This is not mine, this I am not, this is ...


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According to the Theravada Patimokkha, it appears that medicines and some other requisites like needle boxes are communal property that shouldn't be kept longer than required. On the other hand, cloth or wool for robes and an alms bowl which are not determined for personal use, shouldn't be kept for too long, and should be given to communal ownership. The ...


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I was a monk for ten years. To answer your question, the answer is no, they are not communal property.


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I can't speak to the Pratimoksha followed by Theraadans, however, according the the Pratimoksha of Mulasarvastivada (which I foillwed when I was a monk), there are certain items no monk can possess (e.g. a meditation mat made of black sheep's wool) - so if offered, one might accept it - but then turn it over to the abbot. Otherwise, the only other relevant ...


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