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Go on, even better as Novice or monk, good householder, as it's good if having ways to associated with Venerables, else is all a matter of individual deeds (kamma). Do one not waste a m9ment when kusala citta arises, as defilements are quick 8n pulling back. As for formal assistant: Community Officials: All Community officials must be free of four types of ...


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Ud 8.7 tells the story of a junior monk accompanying the Buddha who disobeyed the Buddha, was disrespectful to him (please see this footnote for details), dropped the Buddha's possessions and abandoned him. He was shortly attacked by thieves. I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was journeying along a road in the Kosalan country with Ven. ...


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The whole practice, paths and fruits, are fruits of kamma, and as it is known, those can be realized in this very existance, good householder. So stories are all full of such samples, even Arahat-ship by just "listen" some words. If missing a formulation in regard that kamma may rip quick, later or in other lifetimes, maybe Deed-gained body helps ...


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Whatever one contemplates much becomes the inclination of the mind. Kasina in the Sutta refers to an object of visions associated with bodily senses & qualities discerned by an intellect divorced from the five bodily sense faculties as perceptions of infinite space & consciousness for formless release. Kasina are varied in form object as shapes & ...


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Yes the ten kasina mediations are in The Middle-length Suttas (Book 2, Chapter 3, Sutta 7 “Great Sakuludayi Sutta”), and I have heard they are other places, but havent come across those. “Again, Udāyin, I have proclaimed to my disciples the way to develop the ten kasiṇa bases. One contemplates the earthkasiṇa above, below, and across, undivided and ...


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I'm a thai and my english is very basic. I found this in wikipedia, and it looks like a slander because they put the less reference, and miss the point. Many bias point the reader out of the reference. Everyone can show up their opinions, and we should listen to them respectfully, but it doesn't mean "proper" when they show up their opinions by ...


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Time in DN 16, MahaParinibbanaSutta, is already clear for the Sutta Pali memorizer, but it's hard for the reader because it's too long for skipping reading. Memorizing with the memorized & enlightened monk is the way to study tipitaka faster&easier really really. In DN 16... Ven.Sariputta's Lion's Roar (no. 16) comes first story, then the Buddha ...


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A lengthy comment on Ruben's answer; I think Thanissaro wasn't necessarily wrong in meaning but is rather sloppy there saying; "This process is pursued until it arrives at the "themeless concentration of awareness." When noting that even this refined level of concentration is fabricated, inconstant, and subject to cessation, one gains total ...


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Transcending form, leaving stress behind, perception shifts to space: MN121:6.1: Furthermore, a mendicant—ignoring the perception of wilderness and the perception of earth—focuses on the oneness dependent on the perception of the dimension of infinite space. Transcending space, leaving stress behind, perception shifts to consciousness: MN121:7.1: ...


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This is well explained by Ven. Thanissaro in his commentary to MN 122: This sutta gives many valuable lessons on practical issues surrounding the attempt to develop an internal meditative dwelling of emptiness, to maintain it, and to see it through to Awakening. Some of these issues include the need for seclusion as a conducive setting for the practice, ...


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Similar to Andrei's answer I note (as fact) that it's a narration of what the Buddha thought, not what he said. Going even further I might speculate that it's similar to Mother's saying to children, "While sitting in his office, Dad thought, 'Isn't it good that the children are playing quietly, and doing their homework'" -- i.e. it's said to convey ...


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In many traditions, attainment is not regarded as a permanent mental state, but requires constant practice. This is why, for example, Dogen Zenji wrote: "we do not practice to become enlightened, we practice because we are enlightened". Before his enlightenment the Buddha spent extended periods alone in the forests: “Such was my seclusion that I ...


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Obviously that entire text was authored by someone else, speaking about the Buddha in the third person. In my understanding, the part about the Buddha leaving the quarreling Sangha is based on real events, while the thoughts going through Buddha's mind must be the author's conjecture. To be clear, I'm not saying Buddha did not leave the quarreling Sangha for ...


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All of the following quotes come from MN 44. One of the five aggregates is feeling (vedana) or sensations. It's a mental process. Perception and feeling are mental. They’re tied up with the mind, that’s why perception and feeling are mental processes.” There are 3 types of feeling. “There are three feelings: pleasant, painful, and neutral feeling.” “What ...


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In SN 15.5, SN 15.6, an individual monk and in SN 15.8, an individual brahmin lay person, spoke to the Buddha, and asked a question about the length of an eon. The Buddha answered it and then reflected on how samsara (translated by Ven. Sujato as "transmigration") has been going on for a very long time, with an unknown beginning, and tells the ...


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This is as close as it gets afaik; A2. "Because there actually is the next world, the view of one who thinks, 'There is no next world' is his wrong view. Because there actually is the next world, when he is resolved that 'There is no next world,' that is his wrong resolve. Because there actually is the next world, when he speaks the statement, 'There ...


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This might be exactly what you're looking for: https://discourse.suttacentral.net/t/the-woman-who-raised-the-buddha-by-wendy-garling/20804


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The Buddha and his wife were first cousins through his paternal aunt, Amita. You can check out the numbered references on the wiki page to get more information from the listed sources. Yaśodharā was the daughter of King Suppabuddha,[4][5] and Amita, sister of the Buddha's father, King Śuddhodana. She was born on same day in the month of "Vaishaka" ...


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