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In suttas Buddha uses two kinds of language. One language employs worldly concepts such as rebirth. Another language introduces technical concepts such as Dependent Origination. The first type of language is very simplistic and is meant for beginners, the technical language is much more precise and is meant for advanced students.


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One of the difficulties of translation is that it operates on multiple levels. The translation of an individual word often depends on the meaning of the sentence it is embedded in, the meaning of a sentence depends on the nature of the text it is embedded in, and the nature of a given text relies on subtleties of the author's worldview. This is particularly ...


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Dhammapada 153 - 154 in Pali: Anekajātisaṃsāraṃ, sandhāvissaṃ anibbisaṃ; Gahakāraṃ gavesanto, dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ. Gahakāraka diṭṭhosi, puna gehaṃ na kāhasi; Sabbā te phāsukā bhaggā, gahakūṭaṃ visaṅkhataṃ; Visaṅkhāragataṃ cittaṃ, taṇhānaṃ khayamajjhagā. Translation of Dhammapada 153 - 154 by Ven. Buddharakkhita: Through many a birth in samsara have I ...


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Good question, well thought out and described in detail. Your proposal 're-becoming' may be better than the other words, at not implying an immutable soul underlying, compared to 're-birth' and 're-incarnation', 'transmigration', etc. But it has its problems as well. The biggest one being that it doesn't easily convey you're talking about rebecoming after a ...


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All possible birth is truth either a smallest moment or reincarnation, but the reality truth is the smallest particle which can see after getting strong enough concentration meditation and insight meditation. This is the real birth which imagined by the ordinary as imagination truth or imagination fake. It something like we think atom is car but it is atom ...


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One strong impression from the Pali suttas (due to the lack of discussion with Brahmins on the subject in the suttas) and the little I have read of the Vedas is the Vedas did not contain any systematic teachings on the subject of reincarnation. The impression (from the little i have read) is the Vedas taught about two worlds, namely, this world & the ...


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I will comment more later and provide sutta quotes. Initial points: As said in the question, there appears no commonly used equivalent to punarjanma (puna-jati) in the Pali, apart from "dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ" found in Dhammapada 153. However, the meaning of "dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ" depends on the meaning of the word "jati". It ...


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It is very clear that the english word 'rebirth' in Buddhist writing and practice causes a whole host of confusions and misunderstandings. This is evident in this forum with the myriad questions and debates that have erupted as a consequence. As an added complexity, not all of the confusions and misunderstandings are related or easily dispelled in the same ...


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OP: How is it possible that those who achieve Nibbana are morally infallible? Once ignorance and the rest of the ten fetters have been uprooted, the enlightened are free from mental defilements, causing them to not have any thoughts based on greed/ lust, anger/ aversion or delusion. Please read the Buddhism part of this answer for more details. OP: How is ...


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The Four Noble Truths talk about suffering. That there is suffering, the cause of suffering, the cessation of suffering and the way to end suffering permanently. It's not about the cycle of rebirth. Please read this answer to understand what suffering is in Buddhism. It's about discontent and unsatisfactoriness. Also, please read this answer and this answer ...


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Since your birth, if you haven't experienced any of these, yes it's not profitable. Got sick and hospitalised for days Felt pain both physically and mental Lost someone loved Getting older ... Etc.


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I have relapsed out of Buddhism two times in my past. I was/have been part of the Theravada Mahasi Sayadaw tradition under Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu's teachings... Yes, the cause for relapse is understandable. How is it possible that those who achieve Nibbana are morally infallible? The above applies to very few individuals. They are morally infallible because ...


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To the extent that you are reborn at all, to that same extent you are reborn from every moment-to-moment. With this in mind, ask yourself: "Why is it profitable to stop the cycle of rebirth from moment-to-moment if it is not 'me' who is reborn?" Let's break this down into some piece-wise questions: Do you accept the premise that you are reborn ...


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Excellent logical question however the question ultimately has no relevance because it merely represents the false ideas that have arisen in Buddhism for the last 2000 years or so. In summary: The original scriptures refer to two types of teachings: (i) moral/mundane/kamma teachings for worldly people; and (ii) transcendent/supramundane teachings for ...


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As to biology you might want to look into Robert Lanza's work, he is a biologist and is also into theoretical physics. Therefore you might want to check out his take on the biology side of things. I can't vouch for him being the bearer of truth but he comes off as seemingly reasonable. He tends to give talks at Buddhist assemblies and therefore i mention him....


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Section 1: Morality How is it possible that those who achieve Nibbana are morally infallible? It depends on how you are approaching this question. From an outward perspective, someone fully awakened is not morally infallible, because there will be some people or groups that believe that their actions are not moral. From an inward perspective, someone fully ...


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Sabbe dhamma anatta - all phenomena is not self. What does that mean? What exactly is a "self"? It turns out that what you call "individuality" is exactly what the Buddha called the "self". It may be pegged to consciousness or body or mind or anything else, but that's what it is. The self or individuality is an emergent and ...


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Buddhism is the middle way, between eternalism and nihilism, between an immortal soul and everything ends at death. The candle metaphor as I understand it comes from: The king asked: "Venerable Nagasena, is it so that one does not transmigrate and one is reborn?" "Yes, your majesty, one does not transmigrate and one is reborn." "How,...


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