New answers tagged

0

The “whole” is neither the sum of parts, nor a unity. From the perspective of relative knowledge it would more correctly be stated to be multiplicity found in unity, but as soon as you start conceiving a thing called “unity” you are lost. This is philosophical. From the perspective of absolute truth, there is nothing that can be accurately said—language is ...


1

Perception is interpretation. Interpretation is inference. When we perceive the chariot we infer it from its signs, then project that inference back on the basis (the parts and the context). This projection is the source of trouble (dukkha) because we ignorantly tend to attribute our own, often incorrect, interpretations, biases, and assumptions to the basis ...


1

We do not need to see the whole to recognise what it is. Perception of parts of car or chariot is sufficient to establish it is car or chariot. Similarly parts of face features are enough for us to conclude who is. We do not necessarily perceive the whole. Yes we can hold perception of things which were but are no more.


0

Good householder, As for Unbound, Nibbana, yes, it's independent from cause, all else, no, no single phenomena can be found in the world, not depending on cause. Suññata, how ever, is conditioned, required nourishment. [Not given for stacks, exchange, world-binding trades of other kind but to be used torward the Unconditioned]


0

Cause and effect are not independent but are meditated by mind.


0

The Buddhist problematic — the central concern that Buddhism focuses on – is self-illusion. We believe that we should have a different relationship with the world than we do, a different relationship with others than we actually have, even a different relationship to ourselves. That self-illusion leads to discontentment and craving. Emotions aren't exactly ...


2

You have put it wrongly. You say all my emotions are deceptive, that is an incorrect observation. Correct way to put it is emotions are not me , mine or myself. It will come as a surprise that you can also say consciousness is not me,mine or myself. Does that mean you will become devoid of consciousness? No you won’t. Does that mean consciousness is ...


2

There was an archaeological find at the site of the famed Buddhist university Nalanda. It was either on a piece of pottery or a mural inscription, I forget which, but the words in Sanskrit read "Seeing emptiness, he feels compassion". You are laboring under a mistake. The reality is that compassion and emptiness are the same thing. When we ...


0

I think that Buddhism talks about suffering and its cessation -- states of woe, and the liberations from or antidotes to those states. For example the three poisons: desire, aversions, and ignorance are all harmful in their own way. The Brahmaviharas are said to be the answer to, the right way to behave in, all social circumstances. Meeting someone who's ...


0

I have asked a similar question previously albeit, from Mahayana's point of view. See the link below. Some of the responses provided there may point you in the right direction. If no sentient being exists, for whom is there compassion? 'A Guide to the Bodhisattva Way of Life' by Santideva [Qualm:] If no sentient being exists, for whom is there ...


0

What is emptiness ? It is the realisation that none of the five aggregates are me , mine or myself. When none of the aggregates are me , myself or mine then will there be a craving for the existence or non existence of those aggregates ? No. When that is realised your mental agony immediately goes away and your physical pain reduces manifold. You are calm ...


4

This answer is from the Theravada perspective. You are thinking about this from the frame of reference of Vedanta, where there is only one thing real and eternal, and the others are illusion (maya) which are not eternal and changing. In Vedanta, this one thing that is real and eternal is God, whereas you replace this with shunyata (emptiness), which means ...


1

You know that feeling when you look at the world and can't help but see that it is messed up (all wrong!)? And you feel a kind of aversion, a mix of pity and disgust? Guess what, the enlightened folks looking at the world notice the same exact problems as you, except they don't feel aversion or disgust. Instead they feel compassion. So compassion is the ...


0

There is no such as physical pain arising in what the Buddha called "dwelling in emptiness" and one would be wise not to follow householder's desired practice of "pseudo-emptiness" as the most actually teach and practice, just developing the most dangerous "household-equanimity". If one wished to come to this state one has to ...


Top 50 recent answers are included