New answers tagged

0

There are things one can try; Try the satipatthana noting method, focusing on the states of mind and the arising, persistence & cessation of thoughts, feelings & perceptions, in particular as they occur when the "panic" starts. Optionally try the preliminary counting method outlined in Visuddhimagga. I think neither counting nor noting will ...


0

I feel the same way. I am meditating for quite a while. But especially lately I feel almost like suffocating when trying to "be breathed". It seems like my mind says no! You keep on doing it! :D I also have this deep intuition that it is something about letting go control and to really sink in pure conciseness which the mind refuses to let me do. ...


0

Appropriate attention can and should imo be explained as directing the mind, ie 'one who has some work to do ought not think: ''i have some work to do, after doing the work my body will be tired, why don't i lie down? So he lies down." Appropriate attention is to be seen as food for factors of awakening. Inappropriate attention as food for hindrances. ...


1

According to Abhidhamma exegetical texts, meditation of the 4 types of sense-sphere functionally inoperative-indeterminate cittas associated with wisdom (paññā) leads to knowledge of purity (vodāna), issuing in the supramundane Path-cittas of Once-returner (Sakadāgāmi) and Non-returner (Anāgāmi). That's incorrect and impossible. 8 Mahakiriya-Citta can not ...


0

I think it depends on the person's personality. Mindfulness of fear is pretty effective. Just like the Buddha saying to Mara, "I see you, Mara". I recently read an article called Inviting Mara To Tea. It talked about welcoming and thanking Mara. Treating Mara as a messenger to teach you. In line with that, I think the Brahmavihara should be quite effective....


2

There're quite a lot of essays on the Brahmavihara written by Vens. Thanissaro, Buddharakkhita, Siriwardhana, Nanamoli, etc. and of course in the Nikaya suttas themselves. See various links here and here


1

There is unrest of mind; frequently giving unwise attention to it — that is the nourishment for the arising of restlessness and remorse that have not yet arisen, and for the increase and strengthening of restlessness and remorse that have already arisen. — SN 46:51 Denourishing of Restlessness and Remorse There is quietude of mind; frequently giving wise ...


4

Just feel the body in general as one breath in and out. Then allow the body to relax. As the body relaxes, so does the cognitive mind.


1

Try to remove notions of "I", "mine", "myself" and fear/anxiety will have no anchor to latch onto: "Herein, Bahiya, you should train yourself thus: 'In the seen will be merely what is seen; in the heard will be merely what is heard; in the sensed will be merely what is sensed; in the cognized will be merely what is ...


1

Saripathana based on breath and walking meditation could be the best. I am more inclined to practice walking meditation. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngEhlYiM--E&t=2s


1

David, you've actually partly answered your question. You know the over-controlling has caused the energy loss. This is the opposite of proper meditation, which brings about more energy, and wakefulness. Try this: Don't try to meditate. Why is that a good idea? Because presently your view of meditation is incorrect. That's why it isn't bringing you good ...


1

This happens because the meditation lack alertness. You focused on calmness without cultivating vitality. That will surely bring about drowsiness, and it leads to sleepiness. In this state of non-wakefulness, of non-clarity, discernment is very weak. So, it's easy for any mental obscurations such as anger or sadness to build up without your noticing. So, by ...


Top 50 recent answers are included