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Since it is impossible for an unenlightened being to know the quality of another’s mind (that being a siddhi that comes only with enlightenment) there is no way to judge the quality or character of someone else’s practice. However, we can see the character of an individual in their way of being towards others, which may call into question the true extent of ...


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Yawning during meditation acts as a fatigue flush for me. Practically all my meditations begin with periods of intense yawning accompanied by corresponding tears.


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Observe the yawns as a casual observer.


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Alexander Wynne writes about them in his book, The Origin of Buddhist Meditation. In particular, see chapter 2, which has the following introduction: In some of the earliest biographies of the Buddha, it is claimed that the Bodhisatta was taught the ‘sphere of nothingness’ by Āḷāra Kālāma and the ‘sphere of neither perception nor non-perception’ by Uddaka ...


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"Having gone forth in search of what might be skillful, seeking the unexcelled state of sublime peace, I went to Alara Kalama and, on arrival, said to him: 'Friend Kalama, I want to practice in this doctrine & discipline.' https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.036.than.html


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I agree with James. You are describing something normal, there is nothing to worry about. You probably did some nice progress, so congrats about that. If you can talk with a teacher, that would be great. If you can't, then be kind to yourself and remember that it's normal, so there is no reason to worry about it or get too attached to it. Your English is ...


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It’s called a “kundalini awakening” in yoga, and “tummo” in Tibetan Buddhism. Seek out a qualified teacher who can guide you through this, as it is both a beautiful and a possibly dangerous event. You can get lost in it and suffer various emotional or motivational problems, but properly harnessed it can launch you into major spiritual advancements. The key ...


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I haven't seen the video yet, but I'd say that no scientic theory would be able to tell us how are we supposed to live or what is valuable to follow and what to abandon. Science shows what is the world and what is the relation between its parts; philosophy, ethics, spirituality and religion try to give us a "why" should we follow one way of life or ...


2

"The freedom of my swinging arms ends at your nose." This video promotes the value of developing consciousness beyond personal concerns into a consciousness that embraces the world around us. In the suttas, one reads the equivalent: AN9.33:6.2: If someone should say, ‘I do not know or see where the perception of the dimension of infinite space ...


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Theory of Evolution is not a theory at all. Just listen to what it essentially says, it says that things are the way they are because other ways died out(Natural Selection). That is not any logic at all.Although things change based on past karma, we can't say that the modern theory of evolution is correct. The discussion on youtube link is very basic and ...


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Of course. Buddhism isn't beholden to evolutionary theory! What makes evolution the standard bearer for what constitutes right livelihood?


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If the determination for higher path was made and one finds it difficult to return to previous fruition, is it then just a matter of making new resolves or is one somehow stuck developing the path for a while? Both can be the matter, good householder. At least real determination might be "blocked" by missing serious intention. And such is of course ...


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- Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā-sambuddhassa - A monk endowed with these five qualities is incapable of entering & remaining in right concentration. Which five? He cannot withstand (the impact of) sights, he cannot withstand sounds... aromas... tastes... tactile sensations. A monk endowed with these five qualities is not capable of entering & ...


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WHY does one believe, that he was totally free from misery or mental anguish? Perhaps you can see the "Noble Truths" in your own life -- suffering, cause of suffering, cessation of suffering. Given those are true, based on your own personal experience, perhaps it's not too hard, perhaps it's plausible, to imagine that someone (the Buddha) who ...


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OP: Here is the problem: we know that the Buddha suffered hardship in this world, including sickness and requiring a physician at times. We know that he had enemies who wished him harm. How then is it possible to believe that the Buddha was the happiest or most fortunate person ever to exist? Surely, out of all of history, with billions of people, there must ...


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I’d suggest you to meditate in a quiet environment. It’s more relaxing for the ears, and then the mind. It also enables you to face yourself in silence and might help you realize the emptiness of things... If you really want to have some chilling music in the background to help you relax at the beginning of your meditation it’s not bad per se but don’t ...


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Well first putthujjanas won't know anything about the dhamma until they become at least sotapanna. Until this, all puthujjanas have is believes and doubt. It's completely normal. All the puthujjanas can do is cultivate what the buddha recommend to be cultivated, that is the 8 fold path. This is pretty hard for anybody. It's worse when there is no buddha. ...


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From what I have learned , I think you should meditate alone at secluded places. Buddha has repeatedly said employ “empty” huts to meditate ... you should avoid the noise of city and music for better meditation.


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Meditating with music is inadvisable: AN8.41:8.1: ‘As long as they live, the perfected ones give up dancing, singing, music, and seeing shows; and beautifying and adorning themselves with garlands, fragrance, and makeup. However, if the mind needs a focus, it may be helpful to consider the third opportunity for freedom: AN5.26:4.1: Furthermore, it may be ...


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Listening to music, among other liminally conscious activities, like scribbling or tapping a pencil while listening to a lecture in class, are ways of distracting one’s attention from other more disturbing phenomena such as street noise, but the goal of meditation is to focus the mind, not distract it. I suggest that buying some industrial grade earplugs (...


1

The buddha said that sound is a thorn for mediation https://suttacentral.net/an10.72/en/sujato More generally, the idea that right meditation is the focus on object of the senses is from the commentators from their lack of yoniso manasikara, ie ''right thinking''. and their ideas taken from the hindus that mantras, the sound Om and so on, can get you into ...


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If you simply observe everything, eventually, the mind starts wandering. So, observation of the breath in vipassana serves a few functions: It anchors the mind into the task of observing the breath and you need mindfulness to keep returning to this task, to prevent the mind from wandering. It calms the mind down. With the breath, there comes other physical ...


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When you watch your breath, seeing the quality or character of each in-breath and out-breath allows you to really see your feelings (not sensations, that's a bad translation). Breath is the best pointer at your emotional state.


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Aren't these two mutually exclusive? No. When the breath is known within the body, simultaneously sensations within the body will be felt. Also, the impermanence of the breath will be experienced.


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