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There is this sutta as well: “Once upon a time, Ānanda, there was a market town in this spot named Vebhaliṅga. It was successful and prosperous and full of people. And Kassapa, a blessed one, a perfected one, a fully awakened Buddha, lived supported by Vebhaliṅga. It was here, in fact, that he had his monastery, where he sat and advised the mendicant Saṅgha....


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Well it is most certainly based on these passages; Take another mendicant who says: ‘I’ve developed the heart’s release by compassion. I’ve cultivated it, made it my vehicle and my basis, kept it up, consolidated it, and properly implemented it. Yet somehow the thought of harming still occupies my mind.’ They should be told, ‘Not so, venerable! … For it is ...


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In MN 140, the monks asked the question: "Tassa kā gati, ko abhisamparāyo". There is an exact sutta in the Majjhima Nikaya, namely, MN 68, which ends with the Buddha explaining why he answers this very question. MN 68 says, per Horner translation: The Tathāgata, Anuruddha, does not have the purpose of defrauding people nor the purpose of cajoling ...


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The questions are similar in that the existence of self appears to be discussed. In Vacchagotta's question, a nonsensical demand about the question of existence of self is simply ignored as nonsense. However, in the case of the monks, they are simply using the convention "he" as a proxy for "that aggregate known as Pukkusāti". And the ...


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I don't see the similarity Vaccagotta asks whether there is a self or not and i assert that meaning is close to whether there is a soul-consciousness. Bhikkhus ask where was Pukkusati reborn. A person can be said to be reborn without there being an assertion of the persistence of consciousness. Like knowledge is transferred from a teacher to student or how a ...


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I decided to provide a second answer to this question because the definition of a non-returner has never been clear to me. I personally do not believe a non-returner attains Nibbana in a future life. Therefore, this second answer to the question, whilst unorthodox, is as follows: Iti 96 says the word "return" means to return to sensuality, as ...


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The highlighted translation in the question of "Tassa kā gati, ko abhisamparāyo" as "Where has he been reborn in his next life?” appears questionable or dodgy. "Gati" can simply mean "progress" and "samparāyo" simply means "future" (per Iti 44). Therefore, the question could simply be "what was ...


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Because anyone with even a basic understanding of ecology recognizes that it is literally impossible to live on this planet without your existence causing the death of another creature. Let me ask you this- which is more horrible, the millions of cattle that are slaughtered for beef or the 70 billion creatures that die each year to produce staples like corn,...


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Fwiw i think the meaning is close to there is 'thinking' & 'that; which one thinks about' and the two aren't the same. However one thinks or conceives something it turns out to be something else. Iow reality is whatever it is except from what you think about it. Analogically whatever object you paint a picture of will turn out to be something other ...


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Thanks to ChrisW for additional clarifications. In my understanding, this is a reference to a folk poem-turned-proverb popular at Buddha's times about impermanence and the futility of human condition: Yena yenahi maññanti, Tatotassa hi aññathā; In whatever way you think of it It invariably gets otherwise. Here Buddha creatively uses it to emphasize the ...


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The Chan/Zen tradition, for this reason, has always emphasized “special transmission outside the teachings, without reliance on words and letters.” Case 40 in the Mumonkan (Gateless Gate) illustrates this perfectly: When Isan Oshõ was with Hyakujõ, he was tenzo [典座 head cook] of the monastery. Hyakujõ wanted to choose a master for Mount Tai-i, so he called ...


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When I want to analyse a sutta or a translation there are two places I turn to. One is Ven. Sujato's translation with the "View root text with translation" and "Activate Pali word lookup" options enabled. That gives this: The Buddha has spoken of not identifying even with the attainment of the first absorption. ‘...


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In the Western, Christian world we teach young children that 'Santa Claus' watches over everyone, rewarding good children with presents on Christmas day, and punishing bad children with lumps of coal (and interestingly, no child ever seems to be punished; there are always presents under the tree in the morning...). Say what you like about it, good or bad, ...


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"Death" ("marana") does not happen to a Buddha (SN 22.85; MN 140; Dhp 21; etc ). The suttas say: Heedfulness is the path to the Deathless. Heedlessness is the path to death. The heedful die not. The heedless are as if dead already. Dhp 21 Therefore, the word "death" ("marana") does not mean "physical death" ...


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Your question has two parts: What did the Buddha mean, and is the phrase "breakup of the body, after death" correctly translated. It seems clear that the latter is correct, and a defense of a positive answer has already been given by Gabe, so I won't address that. "What did the Buddha mean" can only be a matter of opinion, since none of ...


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