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Dharma provides the answer at the right time. Advice may come from many of the well educated and the well wishers; however your path is your own and when the inspirational spark of enlightenment strikes like a bell you will know your decision - as is the nature of Dharma. It could be symbolic or it could be something more mundane, however you will know when ...


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I'm going to make the natural analogy here, and talk about actual vehicles: Theravada is like mounting a horse: progress is slow, steady, personal, and organic Mahayana is like running a railway: You don't want the train to leave until everyone gets onboard Vajrayana is like buying a sports-car or a jet: it's meant to be a fast-track process, to get one ...


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Theravada is the most orthodox and conservative tradition, as it tries to stick as closely as possible to the original teachings of the historical person of Gautama Buddha. Also the Theravada monastic order tries to maintain the original monastic rules from the time of the historical Buddha, although the Buddha allowed his followers to change the minor rules....


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The Buddha did not teach the perception of impermanence to all people. Higher Buddhism is not suitable for all people. Many Buddhists covert to Islam or Christianity.


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The fact that all things are impermanence just make me sad. How do I feel better? There's nothing to do. That's just how Samsara is. Everything that arises must end at some point. You can't change that. Trying to change anything will just cause more suffering. What we can/must do is to come to terms with change through meditation practice. Change is one of ...


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Seeing the truth of impermanence, one finds it sadly unsatisfying. Letting go of the unsatisfying, embrace the limitless. Meditate spreading a limitless heart full of love, compassion, rejoicing and equanimity. MN50:14.4: Come, all of you mendicants, meditate spreading a heart full of love to one direction, and to the second, and to the third, and to the ...


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This is exactly the topic discussed in the River Sutta. You created this mental concept of relationships with people around you, and you cling to it, assuming these relationships belong to you, i.e. belongs to the self. But these relationships are impermanent. If you cling to it, it will bring you suffering when these relationships change or end. The ...


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Not all impermanent relationships cause you sadness, doesn't it? You have clearly noticed joy taking place once a "bad" relationship end (like escaping from the fetters of drugs or alcohol). Can you remember of any of those? This could be a motivator for you to take your relationships fully, i.e., as they start, age, and die. On the positive side, ...


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That which impermanence appears to ,or that which speaks about impermanence. Is that changing ? Any kind of material form whatever, whether past, future, or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, inferior or superior, far or near, all material form should be seen as it actually is with proper wisdom thus: “This is not mine, this I am not, this is ...


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This answer is from the Theravada perspective. When you feel like you fear or dislike people because of their mental traps and neurotic dramas, you can use this opportunity to cultivate the brahmavihara of compassion (karuna). The primary purpose of cultivating compassion is to cure this strong aversion that you have of other people. Aversion or hatred (dosa ...


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I have been recently experiencing tremendous fear, but as I look through my eyes at the world and the objects it contains, the fear does not accord with what I see. The scriptures say there can be valid fear and invalid fear. The scriptures say: 317. Those who see something to fear where there is nothing to fear, and see nothing to fear where there is ...


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This is pretty normal, I'm guessing most practitioners go through this phase. You have a certain - valid but incomplete - understanding of Dharma, and so you interpret your observations from this perspective, creating subjective reality that looks somewhat negative. What you see is not wrong, these negative observations are not wrong, but they are a small ...


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Fear is internal. The Buddha discusses fear at length in MN4. The first step is to consider personal ethics and purify ones conduct by mind, speech and body: MN4:4.1: Then I thought, ‘There are ascetics and brahmins with unpurified conduct of body, speech, and mind who frequent remote lodgings in the wilderness and the forest. Those ascetics and brahmins ...


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You are beginning to notice the natural behaviors that we all carry out. This is a great thing as most people don't even take a moment to understand their behavior or how/why it functions that way. As you are noticing like this, all kinds of weird side effects may start arising, as you are really shaking the foundation of the way you perceive the world. Fear ...


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I searched Bhikkhu Bodhi's translations of the Samyutta Nikaya, Angutarra Nikaya, and Majjima Nikaya, as well as Maurice Walsche's translation of the Dhiga Nikaya. The closest I could come to "incline your mind toward Nibbana" was advice from Sariputta to Anurudda, wherein the latter - who had achieved the jnanas was complaining to the former about ...


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Let's say you go to the doctor and get your blood pressure measured and it turns out to be high, probably because you were anxious at that moment. The doctor tells you to calm down, and then he will take another reading. In order to do so, what would you concentrate on? Surely not on the blood pressure measurement device or the doctor. And surely not on ...


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It means the object is Nibbana and the mental attitudes leading to Nibbana, as literally said as follows: And what is the faculty of concentration? There is the case where a monk, a disciple of the noble ones, making it his object to let go, attains concentration, attains singleness of mind. SN 48.10 To whatever extent there are phenomena conditioned or ...


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From Mahayana perspective true Nirvana is the non-abiding Nirvana, which is a state of not being bounded by any single interpretative framework whatsoever. Does Master Gotama have any position at all?" "A 'position,' Vaccha, is something that a Tathagata has done away with. - MN 72 So it's not as much a concentration without an object as it is ...


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It means to incline your mind towards dispassion, dispassion towards the sense objects, dispassion towards craving for existence and dispassion towards craving for non-existence. Inclining your mind toward dispassion means to incline your mind towards disenchantment, no longer being enchanted with sense objects, craving for existence and craving for non-...


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