New answers tagged

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The Bhavacakra (the "wheel of becoming") is associated with the 12 Nidanas -- i.e. with paṭiccasamuppāda -- as well as with the Three Poisons, the various realms of existence, and so on. I think the "cycle" is a graphical representation or summary of several elements of doctrine. Wikipedia says, The Theravada-tradition does not have a ...


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What is the source of the cycle of life/death in the scripture , Does it have references in the Pali canon? From SN 15.2: At Savatthı. “Bhikkhus, this samsara is without discoverable beginning. A first point is not discerned of beings roaming and wandering on hindered by ignorance and fettered by craving. Suppose, bhikkhus, a man would reduce this great ...


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Where did Buddhism get this from? Why, it got from the Buddha's direct experience, of course. The Buddha spoke in MN 4: "When the mind was thus concentrated, purified, bright, unblemished, rid of defilement, pliant, malleable, steady, & attained to imperturbability, I directed it to the knowledge of recollecting my past lives. I recollected my ...


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Dependent origination includes death and rebirth: DN15:2.1: When asked, ‘Is there a specific condition for old age and death?’ you should answer, ‘There is.’ If they say, ‘What is a condition for old age and death?’ you should answer, ‘Rebirth is a condition for old age and death.’ The sutta continues: DN15:3.1: So: name and form are conditions for ...


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Chris has given the answer the way I expected. However, I thought I look into it from a different angle. You can look at this in a Dependent Origination model as well. Vinnana paccay Namarupa : Due to old Kamma (Sankhara) vinnana create the Namarupa of this life. (say fetus) Then the fetus grows into six senses base. (as Chris noted) With the aid of six sens ...


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People are born from their karma: that is what dependent origination teaches anyway, the abhidhamma version at least. Similarly, traditions that incorporate the 'alayavijnana' see every moment of our life as a ripening of a seed generated by past karma. If you struggle to see how that can make sense in a scientific world view, then why not think of it as the ...


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Piya Tan says, though I'm not sure this is clear, “Old karma” here refers to the six senses. The theme of “old karma” (purana,kamma) is applied to the body (synonymous with the six senses) in the (Kaya) Na Tumha Sutta (S 12.37/2:64 f), where the Anguttara Commentary explains that the body is not “old karma” but because it arises from old karma, it is ...


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I think I get where you're coming from: you believe that 'karma' is ossified dogma, and not why you had faith in Buddhism. If you are entirely unconvinced by dependent origination, or rebirth, then I would suggest seeing "karma" as a fictional means to think about good and evil.


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If you just do a bit of meditating, stick the the 8 precepts (equivalent to the 10 commandments) and get your head round the whole (not actually) suffering thing, then you are sorted. Secular buddhism is another name for this. No supernatural (rebirth, karma, etc) stuff. Admittedly it reduces it to almost a self help book but that is fine. You are not ...


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OP: Is there any reference to the Gita or Krishna in Buddhist texts? No. Only the three Vedas (presumably Rg, Yajur and Sama Veda) are mentioned in Buddhist texts (see MN 95). No other Hindu texts are mentioned. OP: In fact, the Buddha's karma philosophy and the notion of 'skillful karma' ( performing actions as duty without getting attached to it) seem to ...


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I would not use Wikipedia to determine the dates put forward for Hinduism. Krishna's timeline was actually in 3228 BCE to 3102 BCE whereas Buddha's time period was from 563 BCE to 483 BCE. This means Lord Krishna's time would have been 2539 years before Buddha's time, this means Krishna came earlier. Lord Krishna's philosophy was based on the Vedic teachings....


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If you have a system with infinite distance and infinite elements, you will have infinite variance. What does not change is the principle or the mechanics of the system. Ie a coinflip retains an average 50/50 probability as a principle across the immeasurable distance of various flips. Therefore a system follows the same principles with infinite variance in ...


1

Infinity is surprisingly complicated, so let's look at what the Buddha said: SN15.14:1.2: “Mendicants, transmigration has no known beginning. … It’s not easy to find a sentient being who in all this long time has not previously been your mother. Why is that? Transmigration has no known beginning. … This is quite enough for you to become disillusioned, ...


3

“If you want to understand the causes that existed in the past, look at the results as they are manifested in the present. And if you want to understand what results will be manifested in the future, look at the causes that exist in the present” (“The Opening of the Eyes,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol. 1, p. 279).


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The second? I met a pigeon this year which was crippled with an illness. I gave it shelter, food, and water, for about 10 days until it died. I figure that was maybe kinder than trying to kill it when it was helpless. If so, how can I mitigate this bad kamma? "Stop doing it" -- see this answer which quotes SN 42.8. And finally, how can we help him ...


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What do you think of this story? Was I wrong the first time? The second? First time: no kamma ( unwitting/unintentional action ). Second time: mixed kamma with bright and dark results ( active intention/action to kill + active intention to alleviate the state of prolonged suffering ) If so, how can I mitigate this bad kamma? Be more mindful of whatever ...


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Wrong second time. First time there is no factor of intention, second time you wanted him to die for whatever reason. Take a hypothetical example of a person who is unable to kill another intentionally, it being not in his range he couldn't have done it. If not killing is classed categorically as good then the person who doesn't kill can not be blamed for ...


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What do you think of this story? Was I wrong the first time? The second? I think these questions are displaying concern for what others might think. There's a risk that it contributes to throwing us off balance: Now, gain arises for a well-instructed disciple of the noble ones. He reflects, 'Gain has arisen for me. It is inconstant, stressful, & ...


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