New answers tagged

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Worrying, because of its obsession with self (i.e., "I won't finish") is a form or wrong mindfulness. Right mindfulness attends to what will help oneself and others (e.g., "What effort and action would be of value now?"). But you ask about the effects of worrying. These are listed starting here: AN10.114:9.1: Wrong mindfulness is a bad principle. Right ...


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More worrying. Worry is habitual, thus you should train in concentration to be able to catch it and destroy this defilement. Think, 'Worry is useless. I must meditate to deal with worry. If my fear becomes true, then it is all the better to practice meditation right now so that I can deal with my fear if it is to happen.'


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At the time of the buddha, most lay people (ascetics or householders) were not buddhists at all. There were plenty of other teachings with their rituals and believes to follow. The buddha was not interested in changing all lay people's life and less so managing them, especially for the lay people who are not even buddhist and just follow other religions (so ...


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Strictly speaking from personnal experience : Anxiety, sleepless nights, have greatly damaged my health during a decade. So worrying, stress, anxiety, are extremely harmful to the body (more than what is currently understood by allopathic medecine). I had to change life direction and resort to cultivating health and mental balance for a few years to restore ...


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Generally, worry is would be of and unwanted thing happening or a wanted thing not happening. A wanted thing generates craving and unwanted thing generates aversion. Dwelling on these states of mind continuously generates much negativity which makes you sad and depressed. If you do not act out by word or deed on the frustration created due to worry this ...


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This is mere speculations from me, but turning down meat was probably not a viable option during buddhas lifetime, for the sake of survival. A layperson would likely run the risk of starvation without meat, and making vegetarianism a decree could possibly put a lot of peoples health at jeopardy. Again, i am guessing now, but my point is that we can ...


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They are basically the same word, though the anta suffix does give it some specific meaning. Remember that the word karma has heavy religious baggage in ancient India every though it simply means action, from the verbal root /kar = "in regards to doing". So kammanta is a way of specifying that one is merely talking about actual mundane action or work. kamma ...


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Uncertainty occurs because of causes. There is no difference between uncertainty and cause & effect. Death is certain, life is uncertain: maranam niyatam, jivitam aniyatam It disintegrates, monk, that is why it’s called ‘the world’: lujjatīti kho, bhikkhu, tasmā lokoti vuccatī 'Many are the [possible] causes of my death. A snake might bite ...


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From the New Concise Pali English Dictionary: kamma neuter work, occupation; activity, performance. act, deed, action or actions of moral import (producing for the agent an inevitable result or consequence in the same or another life; the action appears to exist in some sense until the effect is completed) an official act of the saṅgha (i.e. an ...


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From the New Concise Pali English Dictionary: kamma neuter work, occupation; activity, performance. act, deed, action or actions of moral import (producing for the agent an inevitable result or consequence in the same or another life; the action appears to exist in some sense until the effect is completed) an official act of the saṅgha (i.e. an ...


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Practise ,routine,habit .all destroy your mind One day you will understand these experience.


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If you've never seen the color red before and someone finally points it out to you, you'll never again be able to unsee the color red. You don't have to practice to keep seeing red. Instead, you begin to see it everywhere. You even begin to see different shades - raspberry, scarlet, vermilion - and how they differ from each other yet still can be ...


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Don't think of karma or wisdom solely as a skill. Neither are something that is added on to us. If anything, they much more resemble something that is taken away. That said, yeah, that's pretty close to how one might understand karma from a Buddhist perspective. Personally, I'd tweak your idea of karma as a "skill" into something more resembling an "...


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Is life all about practises ? Generalizations are dangerous, but i'd still say that buddhism deals primarily with reducing defilements/refraining from behaviors that are not beneficial. At the same time, the noble eightfold path also encompasses attaining new habits. A summary would go something like this: Guard (the risk of unbeneficial habits, not yet ...


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So, Is understanding a practise? There's some idea of progressive enlightenment -- Four stages of enlightenment. I think that the first stage of enlightenment includes "right view" and seeing the tilakkhaṇa -- "understanding" the dhamma, in general. But after that is first seen, there remain various attachments -- bad/residual habits, see for example: ...


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There is wisdom that is practised to develop & support samadhi (concentration) and wisdom that arises from the practise of samadhi (concentration), as described below: Of those, right view is the forerunner. And how is right view the forerunner? In one of right view, right resolve comes into being. In one of right resolve, right speech comes into ...


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OP: So , Is understanding a practise ? Understanding arises through the practice. OP: If it is: We loose skills when we don't do somethings for long time. But enlightenment can not be undone. Yes. As enlightenment is understanding of reality as it is and this does not change in light of new experiances. OP: If it isn't: When we do vipassana ...


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I wrote an extensive answer for the question: How should a Buddhist approach honoring parents who abused them? In summary, you are not wrong if you choose to not to have a relationship with them. Love is something earned. Core on-going relationships require the maintenance of on-going wholesome qualities from both sides. In Buddhism, parents have the duty ...


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(I write this without knowing the specific circumstances in your life, so i hope my answer don't come across as too blunt). How honorable it may be to forgive those who hurt us, it is also a matter of allowing it to take time. We can't force a tree to grow, and beating ourselves up for not having a specific desirable emotion such as being forgiving will ...


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Not if procrastinating what ever is akusala. One can train also in focus of procastination of form, sound, smell, taste, touch and thoughts and it would quickly lead out of Samsara. But if delaying the kusala, the training, then hopeless wandering on can be expected. One should make haste in doing good deeds; one should restrain one's mind from evil; for ...


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I think that in the suttas the path to higher realms is described as "bright kamma". There are four types of kamma: Bright Dark Mixture of bright and dark Kamma which leads to the ending of kamma It's the latter which leads to nibbana. I don't know a good summary. You could search Access to Insight for text containing "bright kamma" -- https://...


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The opposite is also true, selflessness, compassion, non-attachment, non-self are path to higher rebirth but also nibbanna. There're different gradations to the 31 planes of existence due to cultivation of various levels of Sila/Samadhi/Panna. It's not so much the difference between the path to Nibbana vs. higher planes but rather the level of intensity and ...


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Wisdom, i.e. hearing the good Dhamma of the Arahats with proper attention, and apply it in addition to the practice of merits, kusala deeds. [Note that this isn't given for exchange, stacks, trades but only for release from this wheel.]


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Practicing Samatha meditations you reach higher realms. Practicing Vipassana meditation you reach Nibbana. Samath practice attenuates attachment aversion and ignorance. Vipassana practice fully eradicates the attachment aversion and ignorance.


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The Buddha made a distinction between slow and fast practice. Since you're asking about procrastination, let's look at what the Buddha said about slow practice. As you can see, this path is indeed painful: AN4.162:2.1: And what’s the painful practice with slow insight? It’s when someone is ordinarily full of acute greed, hate, and delusion. They often ...


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Heavy bad kamma is always a matter of strong wrong view, and ingratitude is such especially if it's toward real and lasting help: Toward one's Gods, Parents, people of goodness. Much done. It's how ever not bad if based on right view and if the relation is a more or lesser good trade with the world, it would be even good to seek for leaving, correct of ...


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It would be very foolish and dangerous to believe that there is an area of "Narrenfreiheit" (fools-liberality). Violation of rules (Vinaya) and kammic actions (although often related), are two different things. Of course everybody, not having found firm footing in the Dhamma is capable of all Anantarika-kamma. Note also that in kammic issues, others that ...


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This is a complex subject and I will defer to those who practice vajrayana, but from what I understand it is the giving up of vows that incur the very heavy karmic cost. Briefly, when someone with full understanding of what they are getting into, chooses to take the vajrayana vows with regard to a particular guru, then if they break those vows ... there is ...


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It's kinda simple logic: if guru does something that is ultimately beneficial, but in your confusion you think it's wrong, then by denying the guru you are shutting the door to that goodness, hereby creating bad karma. If guru is bad then you're not. But how do you know, if by definition he is the more enlightened, not you, so how can you have capacity to ...


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A lay person cannot commit “Sangha Bedha” as it is only when bhikkhus are concerened, but “Sangha Bedha” is not division among bhikkhus, but the fact of the matter is that today every single Bhikkhu commits schism or “Sangha Bedha” knowingly or unknowingly. The Buddha condemned schism in strong terms, saying that a person who starts or joins a schism in a ...


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