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As I see it, conscience is a natural expression of human awareness; it is, in a way, enlightenment personified. Buddhist practice is meant to develop our sense of awareness (or being-ness), and the natural outcome of that practice is that we become more and more attuned to the natural expressions of conscience. This is not a binary equation, this is the ...


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Canonically, "right livelihood" (or rather "not wrong livelihood") for a layperson was given as, something like, "don't trade in weapons, poisons, meat, human beings, nor alcohol". And I think that's all that's written, about that topic. Anyway, I do just that? As a software developer myself, I've avoided working for "defence" industries. I suppose the ...


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In general, your question is about where to stop. It should be known that in Buddhism, we don't stop. We keep going all the way until the Final Result. As you implied, for every "better" and "purer" there's "even better" and "more sublime". We don't stop, we keep going. And as we climb this ladder from selling drugs to cakes, to healthy food - eventually ...


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The Buddha clearly advocates a sense of conscience in MN8: MN8:12.39: ‘Others will be conscienceless, but here we will have a sense of conscience.’ Conscience is not listed by itself. In fact, a sense of conscience is listed with forty-three other items to consider. Please consult MN8 for the full list (it is too long to repeat here). From MN8, we can ...


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It's a good intention to desire to make a livelihood that does neither harm one self nor others, and conscience is very importand toward path and beyond. As for how to use it all the way to highest liberation, best to get known the talk by the Sublime Buddha to his Son Ven. Rahula. Mudita [Note that this is not given for trade, exchange, stacks... but for ...


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Buddhism does not tell you to sell cakes. Just because Buddhism does not tell you to not do something does not mean you should do it. Buddhism has taught addiction to sensual pleasures is suffering, for both monks & laypeople. Therefore, if you have a good conscience, you should try to reduce addictions & unhealthy lifestyles.


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Can someone who fights, even maybe kills or dies, for a cause he considers right, attain enlightenment? From the Dhamma's perspective, the bravest most courageous warriors are those who won the battle against themselves, not some external enemies. So, yes, it'd take a 'warrior' to attain enlightenment, but without the highlighted part above. For the act of ...


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Actually, only warriors can attain enlightenment. All Buddhas have to die on the cushion if they’re going to wake up. It takes tremendous courage, fortitude, and self sacrifice in order to make that happen. Only a warrior possesses those qualities. But to answer you question, the one really doesn’t have anything to do with the other. It really astounds ...


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