New answers tagged

0

In Buddhism, the best action is always the same: be compassionate. If someone close lies to you, they are afraid of something or wanting to preserve some element of their ego-identity. You don't have to know why they are doing it or what the truth is; you just need to accept things as they are. Keep your eyes open in case the lie they are telling causes them ...


0

That is too vague. It depends on probable or possible consequences of the lie. Whether you will have to rely on or cooperate with them in future. And what harms and suffering may arise from their behaviour repeating or remaining unchecked. The best thing is to be really present with them when discussing challenges like this, and try to open yourself to ...


0

Welcome, Lineke! I don't think that there is a straightforward answer, as I think the situation deserves some analysis. I do not claim that this is the "best" action; I am only using what I've learned from a few Suttas as a guideline, so I would encourage you to read more on the matter. First, I will assume that you know for sure that you are being ...


0

Everything that happens to us is caused by an action we have committed in the sansara. This was common to Buddha as well (Devdatta's actions etc.). Therefore the answer to the question What is the best action? is, Understand that this is a result of an action you have committed in the past (maybe in previous births). Further, try to spread metta (kindness, ...


0

'Going to hell' in Buddhism is not like in Christianity, it is not a judgement. Ksitigharba went to hell, and is a bodhisattva. You should read https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism_and_sexual_orientation Stigma, and denying or silencing issues around sexuality, cause huge amounts of suffering, prevent reporting and accountability, and make many people's ...


1

Buddhism deals with suffering and how to become permanently free from it. Superficial and conceptual things like sexuality are useless in that regard, hence the focus merely on ultimate reality.


0

No. Unskillful bodily action, which encompasses sexual misconduct as it pertains to the five precepts of the laity, was defined by the Buddha thusly: He engages in sexual misconduct. He gets sexually involved with those who are protected by their mothers, their fathers, their brothers, their sisters, their relatives, or their Dhamma; those with husbands, ...


4

Apparently, according to the commentary on rule number 3 of the Pācittiya section of the Pāṭimokkha, one of the defining characteristics of divisive speech is that one has to have the intention of either gaining favor with another party, or causing the disgrace of another. Whereas if one is acting with the genuine intention of putting an end to harm, or to ...


0

A case can be made for someone involved with art as maybe being to some extent & on that account 'intoxicated' with living & pleasant forms. As being heedless in regards to developing his good qualities & at that time not focusing on the theme of renunciation, on the unattractive, on the danger & loathsomeness of existent phenomena; and ...


0

If a person have a small Buddha statue in their room and they (sorry) masturbated in that room, is it considered sexual misconduct? No, it's not. The 3rd Precept is only broken if 2 conditions are met, namely: sevanacittam -- the intention to have sexual intercourse. maggena maggap-pati-padanam - sexual contact through any one of the 'paths' (i.e., ...


0

Earlier I watched a Dhamma Talk by a monk on YouTube. The monk said the profession itself (actor, comedian, artist) is neutral. But in reality we sometimes see that some comedians make people laugh by harming other people (playing harmful jokes on others). If the person do this repeatedly than the person will collect many bad karmas, thus the person will be ...


1

How can that truly know the virtue of compassion humiliate others? If their reproach is genuine with goodwill to correct your mistake you should contemplate on their reproach before you aim to respond. Contemplate on your compassionate acts weigh them against their reproach. Virtue is best seen in action! After contemplating, If you still have a conviction ...


2

This is the chance to cultivate and practise the brahmavihara of equanimity (upekkha), in addition to compassion (karuna). From The Four Sublime States by Ven. Nyanaponika, where he discusses the relationship between equanimity and compassion: Equanimity rooted in insight is the guiding and restraining power for the other three sublime states. It points out ...


0

In Buddhism one can do a 'dedication of merit'. In the Sutta, as far as i can tell, one can share merit with any living being and also dead relatives in a 'possible place' which sutta explain to be the realm of hungry ghosts, any other dead relative not in a possible place can not be shared merit with. I think this is the most beneficial thing one can do. ...


1

To me prayers and meditation are of the same tree but different branches. This is what works best for me. I usually start my meditation by concentrating of the breath for 10 minutes, and then I move onto releasing all parts of the body for 10 minutes. Then I move onto prayers in which I start with people I know (and know their current issues) and pray in my ...


Top 50 recent answers are included