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Based on Piya Tan's analysis of the sutta Venāga,pura Sutta (A 3.63) and his quote of the traditional commentaries, we can see that it's possible to sit, walk, stand or even recline while remaining in jhana attainment, up to the fourth jhana. For full translation of the sutta by Piya Tan, please see Venāga,pura Sutta (A 3.63). For alternative translations by ...


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Encouraging others to demeritious deeds (a-ku-sala) is one of the four ways of evil kamma (aside of bodily doing, by approve, rejoicing, by speech). Praising what deserves dispraise, leads as well toward low realms hell. Like the sharing of merits (kusala), telling of good conducts and let others rejoice with it, share of demerits has same effects like ...


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The answer to this question can only be that there's officially no such thing as sharing of demerit. Despite that, the closest I can offer is telling others of one's past misdeeds as an example of what they shouldn't emulate, and also as an example of how it is possible to change to become better. For e.g. the Angulimala Sutta shows how one shouldn't be a ...


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In the following suttas, it was recorded that the Buddha sat in unbroken meditation for seven days, before emerging. This occurred right after he became fully enlightened. I have heard that on one occasion, the Blessed One was staying at Uruvelā on the bank of the Nerañjarā River at the root of the Bodhi tree — the tree of awakening — newly awakened. And on ...


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The answer to your question is at the center of the Four Noble Truth. Life is pain, no matter what you do. Birth is pain, death is pain, and sustaining our way of life is painful. The cause of pain is attachment and expecatation from who you think you are or whom you expect to become. Letting go of who you are or who you think you should be, is the way to ...


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Buddhism largely follows a similar format to the one you provided, but one is encouraged to 'figure things out for themselves' rather than blindly following a leader like a duckling follows its mother. Encouraging this autonomy empowers a person to see in their own direct experience how they create their future circumstances. "He abused me, he struck ...


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The sharing of merits happens when you make your good deed to be known by others so that they can rejoice or give assistance to it. Having been given in proper season, with hearts inspired by the noble ones —straightened, Such— their offering bears an abundance. Those who rejoice in that gift or give assistance, they, too, have a share of the merit, ...


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Justice vs. Skillfulness might help good householder, if reading with proper attention. And one would also have feets to walk on. Not all needs to be taken when there are skilful ways to step aside. Of course ill-will is an obstacle to go on, yet a wise would/could remove it from the exit path. Knowing that what ever build up would get swept away, in this or ...


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When a tsunami destroys our house, there is hardship. And anger does not help. When oppressive laws destroy our peace, there is hardship. And anger does not help. Hardship opens the door to massive sorrow at the loss of kinder times. But anger and resentment only lead to different sorrows. The Buddha teaches us to kill our anger and give up resentment. SN1....


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The Buddha said: AN10.91:23.1: In the same way, the pleasure seeker who seeks wealth using legitimate, non-coercive means, who makes themselves happy and pleased, and shares it and makes merit, and who uses that wealth untied, uninfatuated, unattached, seeing the drawbacks, and understanding the escape is the foremost, best, chief, highest, and finest of ...


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There are already other answers, good householder. In addition to those, one can share merit by inviting others to join in the carrying out of charitable or meritorious activities, and increase right view, if wished. For e.g. when giving alms to monks, invite others to join you in giving alms, and thereby sharing in the merits. It's of course very much ...


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I could find the following references to the Sarasvati River in the Pali Canon: Now at that time the brahmin Sundarika Bhāradvāja was sitting not far from the Buddha. He said to the Buddha, “But does Master Gotama go to the river Bāhuka to bathe?” “Brahmin, why go to the river Bāhuka? What can the river Bāhuka do?” “Many people agree that the river Bāhuka ...


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