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One of the three basics to get useful answers: Respect, Confidence and Patient and hardly the enviroment here. [Note that this isn't given for exchange, trade, stacks, entertaining bonds, but to escape from this world]


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Something Eckhart Tolle once said... Patience is itself an expectation. When we are being patient, it effectively means that we are experiencing something we dislike, but have decided to wait calmly in the expectation the experience will eventually dissipate. Being patient in this sense is effortful, and like all efforts it will eventually run out of steam. ...


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From Dhammapada 184: The best moral practice is patience and forbearance; "Nibbana is Supreme", said the Buddhas. A bhikkhu does not harm others; one who harms others is not a bhikkhu. Alternative translation from here: Enduring patience is the highest austerity. "Nibbana is supreme," say the Buddhas. He is not a true monk who harms ...


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Khanti/patience is indeed a very important virtue to cultivate. It's listed in Sn 2.4 as among one of the greatest protection for a practitioner. Also refer to many other related suttas. Patience, compliance, seeing contemplatives, discussing the Dhamma on timely occasions: This is the highest protection. ~~ Snp 2.4 ~~


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And what’s the impatient practice? It’s when someone abuses, annoys, or argues with you, and you abuse, annoy, or argue right back at them. This is called the impatient practice. And what’s the patient practice? It’s when someone abuses, annoys, or argues with you, and you don’t abuse, annoy, or argue back at them. This is called the patient practice. An4....


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Restraint I think that another way to frame patience is in terms of restraint. Why is this? If we see a mental defilement arise, we exercise restraint to not immediately give into it. We look at the situation and see it for what it is. In this way, we are exercising patience, but also restraint. Now what does the Buddha think of restraint? Well, Buddhist ...


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This answer is only from the Theravada viewpoint. It's likely that you can find more diverse meditation techniques in Vajrayana. Shambhavi Mudra is apparently an eyebrow center gazing gesture. This source states: Shambhavi Mudra is an eye-crossing technique which is used as a hack to activate the parasympathetic nervous system—which is cognate with the ...


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When I read through the Vinaya rules briefly I don't notice one which obviously prevents monks' being involved in secular politics. DN 2 (see @Robin111's answer) suggests it's inappropriate, but I don't see a Vinaya rule on the subject. Rājā Sutta (Ud 2.2) is similar: Just now, lord, after the meal, on returning from our alms round, we were sitting gathered ...


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This is more of an addendum than a full answer, but I believe this also comes up in the Vimuttimagga, chapter 6.


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Where can I find the references mentioned? (in Niddesa, Abhidhamma, Visuddhimagga) Visuddhimagga > Chapter 3 KammatthanaggahanaNiddesa (Describing the way to recite and learn the meditation from the teacher) > cariyāvaṇṇanā (Describing the mental behavior [for stopping PariyutthanaKilesa] for the teacher to analysis his student behavior), and it's sub-...


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This is the first time I've seen mention of "light" in describing concentration practice in the suttas. I have personally been visited by nimitta but have not been able to sustain it -- for the same reasons in this sutta: distraction, excitement, etc. MN 128: “Good, good, Anuruddha and friends! But as you live diligently like this, have you ...


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The Buddha responded to the questions of others. Writing a book to present a position is a ‘modern’ undertaking. The Buddha’s oral teachings were memorized (thus all the enumerations that exist in Buddhist doctrines because it made memorization easier) because his was predominately an oral culture, but also because the teachings were not a static doctrine, ...


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I guess Buddha's teaching was pretty smart and simple and your question looks like "Why didn't P.Fermat write a book outlining his teaching about Fermat's Last Theorem". Seems in both cases Buddha and P.Fermat gave a lot of hints about Buddhism and Fermat's Last Theorem and those hints can be written in several pages (maybe few lines), therefore ...


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it's hard to believe that the cause for not writing a book to be lack of written script or writing material There seems to be circumstantial evidence that the Brahmi script existed: Brahmi script (Wikipedia) Pāṇini (Wikipedia) Lipi (Wikipedia It's hard to date exactly or with certainty without physical (e.g. archaeological) evidence, therefore perhaps it's ...


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Why didn't the Buddha write a book? Well, he needed writing material and he needed a written script. Now, a written script has to be one that many people can read and comprehend, otherwise it's useless. How do languages and written scripts get standardized, taught widely and made official? Through the ruler or government of a country of course. The following ...


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We can get a glimpse from Wikipedia article on Vedas: The Vedas were written down only after 500 BCE,[101][66][20] but only the orally transmitted texts are regarded as authoritative, given the emphasis on the exact pronunciation of the sounds.[68] Witzel suggests that attempts to write down the Vedic texts towards the end of 1st millennium BCE were ...


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The four nikayas do not mention "writing". However they do mention "reciting" many times. One mention, in particular is quite interesting: AN8.20:6.4: It’s impossible, mendicants, it can’t happen that a Realized One could recite the monastic code in an impure assembly. In another sutta, the Buddha instructs: DN29:17.1: So, Cunda, you ...


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Because oral transmission was the only available transmission media at that time. Any form of documented paper printing didn't exist until a couple centuries later.


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Śvetaketu and Bodhisattva in Sanskrit are Setaketu and Bodhisatta in Pali. There was one person called Setaketu in the Setaketu Jataka, but this is the story of a human on Earth, but I'm not sure if this is the same as Śvetaketu of the Chandogya Upanishad. In any case, this Setaketu is not a Bodhisatta. From this page, we find this story: And, having ended ...


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The Hero & The Tortoise Paradox etc are more about measurement & distance description: eg, infinitesimal division of distance, walk 10 meters in ten seconds: the time is finite & the distance is finite, yet both the time interval & distance interval may be divided into arbitrarily many pieces(which dont even have to be identical in magnitude);...


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The two kinds of debt can be found in the Ina Sutta. The first kind of debt is that of money and material possessions: "Monks, for one who partakes of sensuality, poverty is suffering in the world." "Yes, lord." "And a poor, destitute, penniless person gets into debt. For one who partakes of sensuality, getting into debt is ...


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Nagarjuna's Mūlamadhyamakakārikā (MMK) "Chapter 2 - Critique of Walking" is the same as Zenos paradox that you outlined. If you Google Zeno and Nagarjuna on Motion you will see many articles written by Translators and Philosophers comparing the two. Both thinkers use the idea to prove that conventional reality is not the ultimate truth, but the ...


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I think one needs to put this paradox in terms of Sabbe Sutta; The Blessed One said, "What is the All? Simply the eye & forms, ear & sounds, nose & aromas, tongue & flavors, body & tactile sensations, intellect & ideas. This, monks, is called the All. [1] Anyone who would say, 'Repudiating this All, I will describe another,' if ...


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I think that SN 51.15 is an example: "If that's so, Master Ananda, then it's an endless path, and not one with an end, for it's impossible that one could abandon desire by means of desire." "In that case, brahman, let me question you on this matter. Answer as you see fit. What do you think: Didn't you first have desire, thinking, 'I'll go to ...


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The canonical Buddhist answer will be from Acintita Sutta: "Conjecture about [the origin, etc., of] the world is an unconjecturable that is not to be conjectured about, that would bring madness & vexation to anyone who conjectured about it. And also the Parable of the Poisoned Arrow from MN 63. In physics, this is answered using the Planck ...


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In the SN47.8 it's something like "taking note of a sign" in general terms. They take the hint. So taṃ nimittaṃ uggaṇhāti https://suttacentral.net/sn47.8/en/sujato As in a private chef taking note of master's preference; or a monk taking note of the inclinations of his mind. Might not be relevant to your question tho.


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Fully sustained attention on beautiful breath DN 10 SubhaSutta (I recommend this sutta to be the reference of Jhana because it is long enough and step by step. Notice, some part of this sutta is same as KāyagatāsatiSutta which I refer to Ānāpānassati above): ‘And what, Ānanda, is this so noble body of doctrine regarding self-concentration (Samādhi) in ...


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The step before getting Nimitta can be dodged depending on the practitioner's abilities. Actually, it is not hard for the high abilities practitioner to do step by step or dodge. Notice: I use the associated Suttas. And most of what I refer to is in the same sutta. I don't connect Sutta by my idea. I do it on the context. And there are many people from the ...


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In the Sutta it is made quite obvious that jhana are not only the type of Jhana that Ajahn Brahm talks about; Having folded my legs crosswise and straightened my body, I establish mindfulness in front of me. Then, secluded from sensual pleasures, secluded from unwholesome states, I enter and dwell in the first jhāna, which consists of rapture and pleasure ...


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