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I'm no expert, but I've been meditating consistently for several years & have been on retreat etc. so I have some experience of what you have gone through. I strongly recommend finding a meditation teacher. Its hard to tell what's going on based on an internet post because there are so many factors; when you 'meditate', what are you actually doing, what ...


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In general you can stop what you are doing if you think it's causing you anxiety. Although im not familiar with headspace, meditation usually fails as being ineffective rather than harmful. There are however ways in which one's training would cause anxiety & restlessness but i think it's unlikely here because i think it would be more obvious. Imho, more ...


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From within the practice of meditation, it can be hard to tell whether "it's working" or not. I've been a meditator for more than 30 years and my experience is that it is mostly a very slow process, and only by looking back on it from a long way away do I begin to clearly see the benefits. Life itself has plenty of ups and downs. Meditation may ...


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Welcome to the site. These anxieties are your own psychological issues. They bubble up to the surface as a result of meditation. Meditation initially sounds all nice and pleasant with frilly bits and squishy things - although that is how it is generally delivered in the many brochures - but many don't realize what meditation can actually do. It is about the ...


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Meditation, if done properly, is the super skill that amplifies every mental and physical skill you do in life. It would be stupid to stop meditation. The only question is whether you're doing meditation properly, skillfully, correctly, etc. You've got a great daily habit established, 20min in morning and one in latter half of the day, and regularly small ...


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It's faster mind because of the simple meditation. Normally, people live their lives switching with sleeping mind rapidly, more than trillion times per sec. The sleeping minds will arise lesser after the collective meditation power is better because the stronger minds are creating the very better physical body if no stronger past unwholesome karma to effect ...


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Everyone’s answers on here are speculative at best (though @Codosaur does offer some useful information that is scientifically grounded). The truth is, it probably doesn’t mean anything at all. That said, the mind is a potent machine, and you would do well to be wary of any experience that is overly unpleasant and/or dramatically pleasurable or “spiritual”....


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Scientific research has linked this to occipital brain wave activity during meditation. At these frequencies, the occipital lobe is stimulated in a way similar to the REM phase of sleep (which is when we dream). It is completely natural and normal for this to occur. Just like images arising during dreams, they have no special significance. See here for ...


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It is normal to have some "hallucinations" and is akin to a movie scene or a song coming to mind due to past giving of attention. As one is relaxed one's concentration is stronger than usual and it then upholds these unordinary states of percipience. If one is successful in relaxing & stilling then one will eventually perceive subtle feelings, ...


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Images arising are just subtler distractions than outright thoughts. You should try to increase your skill, so you are not pulled off your chosen object of fixation Later, when you no longer deviate off or away from your object for even a moment over the course of 30 minutes, you will need to learn to keep your sustained attention - not just uninterrupted ...


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Most Monastics/Temples/Meditation Centers have a Youtube channel these days - especially in the West. They often have a weekly "Monk Chat" where people can ask questions in the chat and the monastics answer them live. If you go to Buddhist Insights’ Youtube channel they have a weekly Monk Chat every Friday. You could try and ask your question there....


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Remarkably, for every single question I would have asked the Buddha or the Sangha, I've always found an answer in the suttas. There are a lot of suttas, so searching them can be overwhelming. The internet provides many ways to search the suttas. For example, for Early Buddhist Texts, Suttacentral.net has a prolific search engine that returns a massive ...


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Let's see what the Buddha has to say : Now at that moment this line of thinking appeared in the awareness of a certain monk: "So — form is not-self, feeling is not-self, perception is not-self, fabrications are not-self, consciousness is not-self. Then what self will be touched by the actions done by what is not-self?" Then the Blessed One, ...


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Immediately the longer sitting is more difficult. Sitting for a second is generally easier than sitting for two. However if one trains then one will enjoy sitting longer and his longer sittings will be easier than the earlier short sittings but is really not a fair comparison because the longer were sat up by the shorter. If one master's meditation then the ...


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Can long sits be easier than short sits? Sometimes yes, and other times no. It's more about quality of mind than quantity. If you sit for 1 hour but are only mindful 10% of the time it's better to have a shorter and more "productive" session and do many of them daily. Quality of mind is always above everything else. The time one is not mindful the ...


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In the suttas, the night is broken up into three watches that can be devoted to practice. For example: AN8.20:1.4: “Sir, the night is getting late. It is the first watch of the night, and the Saṅgha has been sitting long. AN8.20:1.5: Please, sir, may the Buddha recite the monastic code to the mendicants.” From the above, one may infer that a watch is quite ...


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