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Mr/ Mrs Jyo Soudagar - Ajay should not cultivate it, if he/she meditates, but should abandon it, when ever such comes along. Listen to or read, Mr/Mrs Jyo Soudagar - Ajay, what was said in the Bhikkhuni Sutta: The Nun, by Ven. Ananda. Just considering the foulness of the body should help; or you may think on the drawbacks (disadvantages) of sensuality, to ...


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Many types of meditation focus on the breath entering and leaving the body or moving through the body as a main object of meditation. In the tradition of meditation which I practice, (Mahasi Sayadaw style), we focus on the rising and falling of the abdomen as a way of being mindful of the breath, but without focusing on the nostril area, which is considered ...


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You do not specify what sort of meditation you practice (saying vipassana or cessation-contemplation doesn't tell much), but Buddhist meditation shouldn't be a direct cause for "erratic energy-power". It should lead to an overall more balanced, tranquil state of mind that is energetic, but not excessively so. What is more likely is that your ...


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I think something is lost in translation here. It has been mentioned before that Thanissaro Bhikkhu sometimes is off the mark in his translations. If we look at some other translations of the Nimitta Sutta - Piya Tan argues that the three bases mentioned in the sutta are: Basis of samadhi, The effort sign and The equanimity sign. So 'uplifted energy' here ...


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From your quote, it sounds like the lack of uplifted energy is the hindrance of sloth and torpor, one of the five hindrances to practice. To quote Ajahn Brahmavamso: Sloth and torpor refers to that heaviness of body and dullness of mind which drag one down into disabling inertia and thick depression. The Lord Buddha compared it to being imprisoned in ...


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Unless relatively deep/refined samadhi & tranquility have been developed, it is difficult to perceive the loss of energy & loss of mental clarity due to orgasm. Instead, to the undeveloped mind, the temporary relief of organism is something ordinary & normal. This is probably why the Western religious traditions probably don't comment much about ...


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If your breathing, body & mind are currently functioning normally, I would forget about it because your question is an example of 'attachment', which Buddhism teaches to let go of. Naturally, I can't say exactly what happened, whether the cause was purely mental (a cathartic emotion); or otherwise purely energetic due to some kind of (non-Buddhist) ...


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For mental lethargy you can try the techniques to abandon sloth and torpor. To overcome physical lethargy you can do walking meditation with a quicker pace.


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Everyone experiences ebbs and flows, it is the natural biological cycle of the mind. However its impact varies from individual to individual, and can definitely be controlled. First, we need a good reason to continue practicing when meditation loses its stickiness. Second, we need to intervene early, before the multiplier effect sets in. If the dullness (...


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Briefly speaking, Mahayana and especially Vajrayana schools assign utmost importance to energetic phenomena at the level of latent potentials, hidden relationships, and subtle influences. However, we don't consider it a "body" or even any kind of bounded entity. We just say, the energy at that level is in flux, things are fluid, neither one nor apart. If ...


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There's a whole samyutta dedicated to the description and analysis of the Bojjhanga in the Connected Discourses (see Bojjhanga Samyutta). Also check out Ven. Piyadassi's great "Seven Factors of Enlightenment"


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Meditation burnout is a thing. In buddhist terms one can consider it as one or many of the types of clinging/grasping, upadana: Bhikkhus, there are these four kinds of clinging. What four? Clinging to sensual pleasures, clinging to views, clinging to rules and observances, and clinging to a doctrine of self. https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn....


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The Kusita-Arambhavatthu Sutta (AN8.80) provides eight grounds for the arousal of energy. In the original Pali version, it appears that the word used is "viriya". "There are these eight grounds for the arousal of energy. Which eight? "There is the case where a monk has some work to do. The thought occurs to him: 'I will have to do this work. But ...


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David, you've actually partly answered your question. You know the over-controlling has caused the energy loss. This is the opposite of proper meditation, which brings about more energy, and wakefulness. Try this: Don't try to meditate. Why is that a good idea? Because presently your view of meditation is incorrect. That's why it isn't bringing you good ...


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If one has just one method by which one tries to attain a pleasant abiding it will often be a hit or miss with regards to attaining seclusion from states that are hindrances because sometimes developing calm be difficult and attempts to do it lead to sleepiness which is a hindrance. Therefore in the pali texts one takes note of mind and accomodates the ...


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Don't play with yourself during meditation. You're wasting your time and I hear that you can go blind if you do it too often. Seriously, though, what you are experiencing is just your own internal energy. Call it qi, call in prajna, call it whatever. It's important, but if you get obsessive about it, it's going to undermine your meditation practice. ...


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This is such a good question! Each of these steps includes a further development of 'clarity', hence the first two steps - of mindfulness and investigation - to get this going. An inspiring source, for some people, is in the essays of Ajahn Jeff, of Wat Metta. These can be found in accesstoinsight.org. His approach is so practical and sensible. The ...


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What is this? a sensation caused by kamma (action) What can I do with it? watch it coming and going, whether it last and might be worthy to go after it as refuge. A just "This has come into being"-approach is not that unwise as letting go of it with it. Does Nyom even know why "Buddhist" try to get toward meditation? (Note: this is not given to trade you ...


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https://discourse.suttacentral.net/t/piti-joy-rapture/2970 : "Pīti is a sense of joy or uplift that occurs during the course of meditation. It is best understood as an emotional response to the pleasure experienced in meditation. It may have physical manifestations, such as goosebumps or hair-raising, but is primarily a psychological quality. Since it is a ...


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It may be piti, an emotion that can be aroused during meditation. It can also be a phenomenon accompanying meditation, since a lot of different unusual sensations can appear as a mere side effect. ...or it may be something else buddhism doesn't have a saying about. Meditation clears the path for a lot of things.


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As I hear it daily, energy is the antidote to laziness: Furthermore, a mendicant lives with energy roused up for giving up unskillful qualities and gaining skillful qualities. They are strong, staunchly vigorous, not slacking off when it comes to developing skillful qualities. --dn33/en/sujato (Tens)


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Energy in science is tejo, form, in Buddhism. The encouragement is indriya and bala in Buddhism. This is the method of jhāna meditation. It was used before the Buddha enlightened by jhāna practitioner. However, the enlightenment of Buddhism is jāna, supra-mundane jhana (lokuttara), as well, so the encouragement was mentioned in tipitaka and atthakatha as ...


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Buddha's many life stories are about the teaching of energy. More information from Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V%C4%ABrya


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In "Awareness Itself", Thanissaro Bhikkhu reported this from the life of his teacher Ajaan Fuang: A Bangkok magazine once carried the serialized autobiography of a lay meditator who used his powers of concentration to treat diseases. One installment mentioned how he had visited Ajaan Fuang, who had certified that he (the layman) had attained jhana. ...


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If you end up with more energy switch to developing concentration. Also you should look at calming the fabrications. In Anapana if you note the length of the breath, which nostril it is going and coming at what proportions, you breath become very slow and eventually stops for some time. Then continue to watch the sensations in the upper lip. Look at the ...


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