7

The guidance I got from one teacher, of Tibetan Nyingma school, is to let the eyes relax. In detail, this includes: keep them open but not stare-open - don't strain to keep them half-closed either, relax the muscles around the eyes, so called soft-eyes, do not focus the eyes on anything in particular, allow them go a little out of focus but don't force it, ...


5

Many types of meditation focus on the breath entering and leaving the body or moving through the body as a main object of meditation. In the tradition of meditation which I practice, (Mahasi Sayadaw style), we focus on the rising and falling of the abdomen as a way of being mindful of the breath, but without focusing on the nostril area, which is considered ...


4

If you find yourself noticing the gap between the breath, then you are no longer focussed on the breath, which is fine, but you should then note "knowing, knowing" or "noticing, noticing". Some also suggest to insert "sitting" in between to avoid having to do this, as in "rising, sitting, falling, sitting". My teacher doesn't, but it's certainly a reasonable ...


4

This is a bit technical, but shows the positive effects from meditating in some key hormones we produce related to health and stress. I was discussing it with my girlfriend (she is endocrinologist and not buddhist) and she was quite surprised with it. If you want you can skip to the end of the text to see the conclusion " Previous studies of the ...


4

You could probably contemplate on it as blood. Women entered the Sangha somewhat later. So I would presume this meditation was taught to monks before that happened. You might have also noticed that seminal fluid is missing from the list. Women having to contemplate on that might actually arouse their lust. Maybe it's the same case with men having to ...


4

Sorry for being something of a jerk , man. I just had one of those days :p so to actually answer your question, it does depend on which tradition we're talking about. I know some (all?) traditions within Tibetan Buddhism teach yoga/stretches, these kind of things. Within the Theravada, stretching, yoga, exercise in general is not considered part of the ...


3

IMHO, - Upaya (skilful means) - the purpose of the Buddha's teaching is liken to a raft to take us across the ocean of samsara to the island of exquisite bliss. Hence 32 parts of the body is adequate enough to accommodate various human tendencies to the attachment of the body. Whereas the classification of the the aggregates to only 5 is sufficient to lead ...


3

Thich Nhat Hahn is the only one I have read who attributes a significance to smiling. It may have to do with the challenging times he has had to endure. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marianne-schnall/beliefs-buddhism-exclusiv_b_577541.html The interview with him contains much of his practice, but here is an excerpt about smiling We humans have lost the ...


3

Is it just something to notice, and let pass? Is it a symptom of something and/or, is there anything to do about it? Treat the object according to your practice, i.e. for Samatha meditation: when mind wanders, bring it back to the breath. Vipassana meditation: every object is treated in the same way, there is no discrimination, i.e. no object is more ...


3

Also I masterbate a lot which is the cause of my weak and ugly body. I don't even have the strength to exercise the way I want. I think you've already identified the crux of the matter. You've been directing most of your energy into a frivolous un-productive activity and have nothing left for other productive ones. So, the next time there's an urge, get ...


2

If this is the case: you can use a stool / chair or stadium seat you can use orthopaedic cushions to added comfort if sitting is a problem you can use another poster like lying down (don't use a cosy or luxurious bed as you will soon fall asleep. A hard surface may be best using a Yoga mat perhaps laying beaded seat cushion on top even if this causes you to ...


2

There are many examples in Buddha's life how others were inspired by his appearance. King Bimbisara was tempted to offer him a palace seeing his stature on the first encounter (this was before his enlightenment), Look at this one, sirs. How handsome, stately, pure! How consummate his demeanor! Mindful, his eyes downcast, looking only a plow-length ...


2

Do we know why they are missing? I don't. Could it be because semen is not being produced/created? Are other body parts missing? It's a good list. For completeness, there is also cartilage (e.g. the trachea), pancreas, a gallbladder apparently, glands (salivary, thyroid, etc.), all the gender-specific reproductive organs, blood vessels (including ...


2

You can use it if it serves you the purpose of one-pointedness attention. But you should remember the benefits of using the breath as your point of attention. The breath is both a concious and unconcious function and because of that it serves as a bridge bwtween them. Also in Tibetan Buddhism conciouness is said to "ride" in the winds (prana) of the body so ...


2

A person who is advanced towards realization of emptiness will typically display a calm, peaceful, and blissful demeanor, even during trying circumstances. I would say that smiling is a natural part of such a demeanor.


2

I'm trying to being present with the help of body sensations. When you are with a sense input you are always in the present moment. The way to be in the present moment or bring your attention to the present moment is to look at sensations. So you are doing the right thing here. As I'm a beginner . I place my hand over my chest to feel that I'm live and ...


2

One thing you might not realize about being present is that it means standing in the river as the water goes by... meaning you can't cling to any one phenomenon or even type of phenomenon. You have to let it go by. So when you say, Of course I feel a calm state but it is again a temporary state. We say, of course it is a temporary state... they all are....


2

This essay on A Guided Meditation by Thanissaro Bhikku can help you. I include a quote here: If your mind wanders off, gently bring it right back. If it wanders off ten times, a hundred times, bring it back ten times, a hundred times. Don't give in. This quality is called ardency. In other words, as soon as you realize that the mind has slipped ...


2

Kayagata-sati Sutta. Buddha was explicit that breathing is part of the body, so anapanasati is a sub-set of body scanning.


2

In meditation you get experience Pīti, Sukha, Passaddhi which can be intense, pleasant and stubtle. If you dwell on these too much you get attached to them and crave to them, causing regression in your meditation. Also if you think this is the final goal you stop short half way. So do not give much importance to them and continue your practice. Also see: ...


2

In meditation, you can consider these three: Mental factors that you cultivate, a bit like a sportsman. For instance, mindfulness, alertness and concentration. Experiences of yours (that are also mental factors, in fact) that indicate something about the quality of your mind. For instance, Prasrabhi indicate the achievement of śamatha. Each dhyāna has its ...


2

Mindfulness should be from awakening to falling asleep, i.e., throughout the day. Formal practice time is just a booster and practice to keep your mindfulness thought out the day.


2

Disclaimer: I'm not a brain expert or brain-imaging expert or neuroscientist. In this YouTube video at around 15 minutes, you can find Dr. Zindel Segal presenting fMRI scans on depression patients practising mindfulness-based meditation (most probably Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy or MBCT). But I'm not sure if it includes body scanning. MBCT was based ...


2

Although I hope I understand a lot of what you write, I don't understand everything; but I understand it more easily when you write in English (text) than when you write phrases or equations using emoticons. I don't really understand (the definitions of) individual emoticons, nor understand groups of them. And you are able to write some (in my opinion) ...


2

I haven't had the "throat" experience, but it's not uncommon to have long or recurring periods of some kind of weird painful or uncomfortable physical/somatic sensation. Teachers that I know of link it to the "knowledge of the three characteristics" phase of the Theravada "progress of insight". It's a sign of maturing insight into the non-self nature of your ...


2

Briefly speaking, Mahayana and especially Vajrayana schools assign utmost importance to energetic phenomena at the level of latent potentials, hidden relationships, and subtle influences. However, we don't consider it a "body" or even any kind of bounded entity. We just say, the energy at that level is in flux, things are fluid, neither one nor apart. If ...


2

Dhammapada; 109(?) If one maintains respect for worthy people four things increase; health, beauty, happiness, vigor ... Sloth corrupts physical beauty... (chapter 18) I also heard that once Buddha said that his monks look as they are similar to flowers that are well rooted because they (monks) were nourished by the mindfulness immersed in the body. ...


1

Eyes half open - when you keeps your eyes open some light comes in therefore you do not become sleepy. Eyes close - when you keep your eyes closed there is less distraction. Following is an interesting quotation from Buddhadasa Bhikkhu on this subject: Now, the eyes. Should we leave them open or should we close them? Many people believe that they must ...


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