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13

As my teacher explained, the reason we are needy and clingy is because we have not discovered how to be our own source of "energy". We are like babies depending on mothers' tits for nutrition, in this case emotional/psychosomatic nutrition. In order to become independent, we must learn to obtain energy by ourselves. The entire Buddhist path can be seen as a ...


5

Each technique a type of character or mental biase. Greedy: the ten foulness meditations; or, body contemplation. Hating: the four brahma-viharas; or, the four color kasinas. Deluded: mindfulness of breath. Faithful: the first six recollections. Intelligent: recollection of marana or Nibbana; the perception of disgust of food; or, the analysis ...


5

Whether a person can hear, see, smell, taste etc. while in a coma is probably a question for medical science. From a Buddhist perspective, it can be seen as a case of senses being shut off as in when you are in deep sleep. Only Bhavaanga Cittas(life continuum) are present in deep(dreamless) sleep. Alternatively, it could just be a case of the patient not ...


4

Pain is obviously related to physical posture; obviously related to the mobility of an individual's body & joints. Therefore, some individuals without any samadhi (meditative development) can sit for long periods while other individuals (who might have better samadhi) cannot sit as long without experiencing pain. For example, in the West, are often ...


4

So the Blessed One, putting on his robe and taking up his bowl & outer robe, went together with a community of monks to the reception hall. On arrival he washed his feet, entered the hall, and sat with his back to the central post, facing east. The community of monks washed their feet, entered the hall, and sat with their backs to the western ...


3

Did the relationship fall apart because there was something lacking within yourself? If so you can cultivate that piece and try to win her back (lots of guides on the internet for techniques on this because women often validate in non one-on-one interaction)... or if you determine what was lacking is not worth it to you... it is not part of your life mission....


3

In Buddhism, it is taught a successful lasting relationship requires two people to share the same qualities, which would include the same life goals. Therefore, in Buddhism, before two people get romantically, sexually & emotionally involved, they determine whether they share the same life goals for a lasting relationship. Today, while women often ...


3

Enlightened beings are not bothered by pain. But if you try to sit through severe back pain, it could lead to further complications. The body requires lying down to recover from back problems. So it's the sensible thing to do. When the Buddha is resting, he usually resides in the Jhanas. Even when the Buddha is not resting, it is said that he enters the ...


3

I think sorrow and pain come from at four three experiences: loss due to natural impermanence, such as the death of a loved one hurt in relation to relationships, which have not worked out or which we were mistreated failure to achieve personal ambitions injury or dysfunction of body &/or mind For loss due to natural impermanence, we can reflect on the ...


3

There are quite a few things to consider here to become skillful at approaching pain and discomfort during practice. Most people experience discomfort and pain in meditation from time to time - so don't let this get you down :) The body (or the mind ;) is not used to sitting still for too long and will complain in some form or another. This is balanced on ...


3

This is not a proper answer about the ethics but my personal experience. Four years ago I was diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer of the jaw and was given two months to live. I prepared my final plans, said goodbye to my family and gave up everything to my wife (who's a MD so truly understood the score). While I've almost died more than a few times (USCG MK on a ...


3

According to my teacher, the enlightened attitude is to see pain is information. (For comparison, the non-enlightened attitude is to block/avoid/suppress pain by all means.) Because pain is information, we should evaluate it, see what message it carries and what it means for us, and then act. Some physical pain is a symptom of a deeper-lying problem, and ...


3

It's not investigation of energy, it's animitta samadhi that can relieve severe physical pain. SN 47.9: Etarahi kho panāhaṃ, ānanda, jiṇṇo vuddho mahallako addhagato vayoanuppatto. I’m now old, elderly and senior. I’m advanced in years and have reached the final stage of life. Āsītiko me vayo vattati. I’m currently eighty years old. Seyyathāpi, ānanda, ...


2

There are multiple "pain clearing" techniques, that have a meditative and Buddhist foundation. First, I'll summarize a few high points (see (1) thru (3) below), then I'll give abbreviated steps for the technique I most often use (see (a) thru (i) below). For whatever understanding is worth (sometimes understanding is the booby prize ;) here's the ...


2

Short Answer: No. Long Answer: First, you'll need to define what you mean by consciousness. If we take consciousness as "conscious awareness" then by definition, if you don't have consciousness of something, then you are not sensuously aware of it. However, it's possible that you may unconsciously register things that impact your consciousness later. ...


2

Does the Bodhi tree actually have medicinal properties as some Buddhists claim? Maybe it does? For example, Phytopharmacology of Ficus religiosa references studies which say it does. I can't judge whether these are good/reliable studies (questioning the reliability of those studies might be a good question for Skeptics.SE if you really want to pursue it). ...


2

Generally speaking, "Buddhism is like Christianity" - in the sense that it has many different schools and sects that have their own practices and disagree on interpretations. However, when it comes to suffering vs pain, most Buddhist nominations should agree with that statement. In fact I suspect this entire idea was taken by DBT from Buddhism. Suffering is ...


2

I don't know how you're sitting but you might want to straighten (lift) your upper back, and ensure that your shoulders are held down (relaxed) and back (not hunched forward and rounded). That (being more vertical instead of hunched forward) helps to ensure that your head is directly above (balanced on top of) your spine, less effort for the neck. You might ...


2

The Buddha did not teach to observe breathing at the nose tip. The Buddha taught to simply let go and give up craving. Just sit quietly and naturally. The mind should be "open" rather than "focused".


2

I believe this might be the sutta in question. There may be other similar suttas. On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Rajagaha in the Bamboo Grove, the Squirrel Sanctuary. Now on that occasion the Blessed One was sick, afflicted, gravely ill. Then the Venerable Mahacunda approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, and sat down to one side. ...


1

Meditate on the repulsiveness of the body. Do Patikulamanasikara meditation until your mind gives up on the notion that there's anything attractive or valuable in the female body. Also do the same on your body until you realize that the body is just a sack of repulsive parts bound together that you have to regularly clean and feed and the idea of going ...


1

Although all of you are very much more knowledgeable than I am, I could suggest walking meditation as practiced in Zen/Chan Buddhism. Enjoy mindful walking in nature "without thinking of arriving anywhere" (phrase from a poem by Thich Nhat Hanh). Using the physical body can get you out of your head where you are not only in pain but worrying about how to ...


1

One must distinguish physical pain from mental suffering. Pain is a fact of life and is inevitable but suffering is optional. "Now, the well-instructed disciple of the noble ones, when touched with a feeling of pain, does not sorrow, grieve, or lament, does not beat his breast or become distraught. So he feels one pain: physical, but not mental. ...


1

Here are a few comments about what I guess it might mean if it is a Buddhist point of view. The first is that Buddhism distinguishes like a rainbow or spectrum of mental phenomena, which occur one after the other, for example: The sense bases -- for example skin and the sense of touch Contact -- between objects and the senses and the mind Feeling -- the ...


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