8

Have you meditated on the reasons why you feel depressed being away from your hometown? Is it friends and your social life in your hometown? Or is it some other reason? If it is the friends and social life that's the problem, then you can try to make new friends. For e.g. why not join your local Buddhist community? For example, you can explore the ...


7

Bipolar and depression are both very serious mental illnesses and should be treated accordingly. Too often dharma teachers who are unprepared try to resolve what are true clinical issues. As I was once told "sometimes meditation is the answer sometimes medication is the answer." That of course does not mean that practice can not help with these problems but ...


5

What you describe is suffering. Intense mental suffering. I am very sorry you are going through this and will try my best to help as I once went through something very similar and it was extremely unpleasant. The true cause of your suffering is ignorance. In short, you are under the control of a delusion right now and the only way out is through knowledge ...


4

Sorry that you're unhappy. I suppose you might like two kinds of advice: How to cooperate with your husband How to feel peace of mind independently I don't know of good, specifically-Buddhist advice for cooperating with your husband. I guess you might want to talk with him -- perhaps ask him what he wants, or talk with his or your family? It's hard for me ...


4

Two thoughts, not particularly Buddhist, but coming from Buddhist experience... You may consider this inspired by my practice and the teacher's instructions... One, regarding "the bad dream" experience. This sounds like a clear indicator that the town in the north is not your place in life. In my tradition we are taught to trust our intuition. Specifically, ...


3

Hmmm that's an interesting take. It's not that feeling bad is bad. That would indeed lead to the vicious circle you describe. It's more like feeling bad is lame. It's like you're starving when your fridge is full. Or you're itching but don't know how to take shower. Or you have cockroaches in the kitchen but don't realize that keeping it clean could solve ...


3

I'm not sure that "you have to". Do you have a choice about it? If so, you don't have to -- you can choose to, if you want to. If not, you don't have to -- it's not you doing it, it's just the way things are. Also I'm not sure about "announcement". That means you're making a decision (by yourself), and announcing the decision after the decision is made. ...


2

According to DutiyaSāriputta Sutta (SN 55.5), one of the conditions for stream entry is hearing or learning the Dhamma from someone already acquainted with it. https://suttacentral.net/sn55.5/en/sujato From that, you could say that get out of the cycle of suffering and narrow-minded ignorance it depends on the change of outer conditions, which may lead ...


2

I believe this is one of those questions which we need to make less complicated, rather than more. In my opinion 'dukkha' doesn't take some kind of profound realization. That life is difficult is something that most people intuitively understand, whether or not they've studied Buddhism. The question from that point - life is hard - forward, is how you deal ...


2

As i see it, one can't rightfully declare suicide to be a solution to the drudgery of mundane life lest one knows exactly what life is. Saying things like 'life is unjust' ie is quite rediculous because it begets the question what exactly is unjust about it, is the spin of an electron unjust? Is the speed of causality ulucky? Hence when one thinks about ...


1

WHY does one believe, that he was totally free from misery or mental anguish? Perhaps you can see the "Noble Truths" in your own life -- suffering, cause of suffering, cessation of suffering. Given those are true, based on your own personal experience, perhaps it's not too hard, perhaps it's plausible, to imagine that someone (the Buddha) who ...


1

OP: Here is the problem: we know that the Buddha suffered hardship in this world, including sickness and requiring a physician at times. We know that he had enemies who wished him harm. How then is it possible to believe that the Buddha was the happiest or most fortunate person ever to exist? Surely, out of all of history, with billions of people, there must ...


1

Carlo certainly discovered the first Noble Truth of suffering, but there are three others: SN56.32:4.5: ‘After truly comprehending the noble truths of suffering, its origin, its cessation, and the path, I will completely make an end of suffering.’ Indeed he understood the fickleness of craving and its role in suffering, which is the second Noble Truth, ...


1

How not to end up like Carlo, or completely depressed at the very least? Keep on questioning, keep on looking for truth. If everything is dukkha, which it is, don't run away - keep getting closer until it's right here. Keep getting closer so you can see dukkha for what it is. Dukkha has to be fully understood, first-hand, directly in front of your own ...


1

Can a being be stuck in (etc.)? Further to @Caoimhghin's answer, I guess that a person -- a "being" -- might even believe so, temporarily. I think that Buddhism warns that, "there was no view of self that would not lead to suffering" -- and that thoughts like, "this is me", "that was me", and "that will be me", might be described as "unwise attention" or "...


1

Since I'm not sure how long you've been studying Buddhism, what I'll say might be what you've already known. Basically you've just had first hand experience of the Three characteristics inherent in life: Impermanence, Non-self, and Suffering. The most obvious one is Impermanence. Even if you and that girl were together, there's absolutely nothing that can ...


1

Denying feelings makes them resist, because they need to be processed before they can be released. Denying them is like impulsively swimming against a strong current, and eventually becoming exhausted by it. The more you fight it, the more it controls you. But the moment you acknowledge them and consciously attempt to understand their causes, is like the ...


1

Wisdom, here especially what is called "emotional-wisdom" is not a matter of age and is always up to ones persons previous and current deeds. As the Buddha told, some might have an easy way, some a hard. It's totally not a matter of age in regard od dealing with feeling, and the younger one is learning skills, the better, for an old is hard to bend. There ...


1

If we have mental illness, we go see a psychiatrist and take medication. It is like when we have a flu, we see a doctor, take medication and rest.


1

All your experiences has 2 components: feeling due to the experience mental pain of the experience [Sallatha Sutta] The main thing is to cultivate stability of the mind so that what ever experience you get you do not feel mental pain. The pain due to contact though is unavoidable. A fact of life is unsatisfactoriness from birth to death. When you grow ...


1

I would not say that it is due to frustration that Supreme Buddha left for we call the ‘Great Renunciation’ when he left all the worldly comforts and riches to find the end of suffering. You are partly right @Irasha... taken on its own, samvega can be a very depressing realization. Which is why it has to be paired with pasada, or confidence: confidence that ...


1

I have been reflecting on suffering and it seems to me that, since everyone is suffering and yet most people around me seem happy and contented, there is a way to live "happily" despite suffering that is accessible to everyone, Buddhist and non buddhist alike. Learn to assess happiness or suffering for very long spans of time. For example do these ...


1

If you would takes the time to read the Dukkhata Sutta in the Samyutta Nikaya you will get to know what is meant by suffering as per Dhamma. We suffer when we cannot maintain things to our satisfaction. Therefore, you yourself can find out the truth of it, by seeing whether there is anything in this world that can be maintained to your satisfaction. Our ...


1

She is New Kadampa - I don't know where that sits under the various Buddhist umbrellas. I think you should know that. I didn't know and I did some minimal research the last time you mentioned it. You could at least read the whole Wikipedia article carefully. My hasty opinion based on minimal research and no personal experience is that it has many branches ...


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