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The technology/internet makes things more complex, makes the mind more active. Youtube, Facebook, Twitter other social media platforms or other internet sites etc.(and now with digital things people is able to engage in these things all the time because internet is not only in computers but now it is in people's "hands" all the time). One thing after another ...


5

There is no awareness beyond the khandhas. There is no such thing as the "Thai Forest Tradition" having a uniform set of teachings. The "Thai Forest Tradition" is just a variety of different jungle gurus who made up their own versions of Buddhism. Ajahn Amaro has wrong view when he said: "that which knows the khandhas is not part of the khandhas". SN 22....


4

You sit for two hours like a log and expect to reach samadhi? Well, I'm sorry to disappoint, but your expectation of meditation as "technique" is completely, utterly wrong. You can't achieve Nibbana, Enlightenment, Liberation, or however you call it, by sitting and mechanically doing something pointless - this is not how it works. Meditation is cultivation. ...


4

Apparently web sites like that are designed to be engaging -- to keep your attention -- and to give a short-term reward (a "like", a bit of news, half-a-spoonful of friendship, a selection of "recommended" videos which adapts according to what you've chosen to watch in the past). I've blocked them on my computer as a bad habit -- an "ex" habit now -- and ...


3

OP: Is it possible to have awareness without a self-sense? Yes, why not? It's very hard to imagine how enlightened ones think about what they use, their parents, relatives, etc... without self-sense. They use things with knowing that this is not me, this does not belong to me, this cannot be kept as I wish. How beautiful that thinking is! Do you know even a ...


3

There is Mahayana text which is believed to be taught by Maitreya and written down by Asanga, Madhyanta-vibhaga-karika. In this text, Maitreya introduces something he calls "false imagination" - which is a mode of cognition that involves imputing subject/object duality onto stuff. The text is much deeper than my ability to explain it here, so I advise you ...


3

It is a good question that you asked @singhindolia. You and I and every one and everything that exists within time and space go through five stages in life. This is inevitable. This is certain to happen and unavoidable. For example, a seed germinates and starts a bud; this is the arising stage. Then it grows to a healthy young tree; this is the growing stage ...


3

Any seed's highest behaviour is to blossom into a full-fledged state which is fruit, flower etc similarly Humans can be full-fledged beings which are in the state of Blissfulness and other pleasant states if he/she gives proper attention to achieve this. I must tell you this when you are thinking about the past there is only one moment which the moment we ...


3

As a Buddhist, is it right to say that anything about Buddhism is right? I assume that "right" might have any of several different meanings: A correct or truthful, beneficial, description of the world and its processes Noble, or ariya Better than other people or beliefs The first ("truthful, beneficial") is a broad subject: See the Kalama Sutta for ...


3

Often around 2:00 p.m. after eating, my body falls tired. Might be a good idea to investigate and tackle the root cause to your tiredness first. Is it because you don't get enough sleep at night? or you usually eat a big lunch? or the workload is too stressful?...etc. It's actually not a bad idea to take a brief afternoon nap for 20-30 minutes to recharge ...


3

Renunciation in Buddhism is related to going forth from the lay or householder life to life as a monk or nun. It doesn't apply to lay people renouncing property or inheritance. In fact, lay people are advised to manage their finances well. There is good discussion in this article, this article and this article. You can read those for much advice. For ...


2

OP: As a Buddhist, is it right to say that anything about Buddhism is right? If it is not right to say so, how right or wrong is it to assume that? The famous statement by the Buddha in the Kalama Sutta applies here: "So, as I said, Kalamas: 'Don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by ...


2

The short answer is "yes". Following the Eightfold Path implies striving to understand and distinguish right from wrong and true from false. So of course Buddhist traditions have a lot to say about epistomology ("What is true knowledge?") and about ethics ("What is good behavior?").


2

Well yes you have 4 main methods to get the citta into samadhi [the normal question is : 4 methods give 4 different samadhi or is it the same samadhi?] THe most famous is the jhana which is ''abiding in the here and now'' or ''in this very life'' http://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/anguttara/04/an04-041.html (puthujjanas today love to slap ''present moment'' ...


2

You may as well ask: is the left hand the same as the right hand? Both are part of a greater whole, both work together to tie a knot, sure. But that knot wouldn't get tied if the two hands were the same. When you see a tree, there is you, there is the tree, and there is the awareness that you are seeing a tree. That last is like a knot that you and the tree ...


2

It is the people who rely on the commentaries, like [REMOVED BY A MODERATOR], who talk a lot about ''doer'' They say that being enlightened is when there is no doer, instead there is ''pure action'' or ''pure phenomena''. for instance Mahasi quotes this Thus one realizes that feeling itself is what feels the plea- sure associated with pleasant sense ...


2

The origin of self is identification with the forms. If there is no identification with the forms then it is not possible to experience the life as a seperate self. The "form" or "self" can continue to exist in a person, but If there is no identification with it, then there is only objective, nondual, clear, peaceful experience of life. The self's momentum ...


2

There is no unchanging awareness. When he speaks of "unchanging awareness", Mingyur Rinpoche does not mean that there is an awareness that does not change. He means that all consciousnesses have characteristics in common. The more we understand (Mahayana) Buddhism, the more we are able to understand this and not take things literally. Generally, when ...


2

When you expect something, it's because it seems to you that you know that something is supposed to happen that way. For example you know that if you help someone they should be nice to you. It seems like you know for sure this is how it works, and based on this knowledge you set your expectation. But this knowledge may be wrong. Maybe the person has ...


2

Maybe some of the "getting sucked in" is only the "medium cool" effect as per Marshall McLuhan: "McLuhan coined the expression "the medium is the message" and the term global village, and predicted the World Wide Web almost 30 years before it was invented. He was a fixture in media discourse in the late 1960s, though his influence began to wane in the early ...


2

In short, helping others is about your own karma; how others react is about their own karma. For example, if you feed a hungry dog in the street, it may shake its tail and appreciate you. But, it is possible that it barks or even bites you after eating your food. You feed it and it accepts. That's enough. Then, forget what you've just done. You feed it and ...


2

Good householder "Son of liberty", The Agendas of Mindfulness Mindfulness Defined might help, once on the path section of concentration. Being, aware, actually means eating, eating off, burning away. If that isn't done in higher spheres, then it's just eating of ones merits. As for the place where he might be: sati, mindfulness toward ones ...


2

In Buddhism, the official terminology is mindfulness (sati) & clear comprehenshion/ready wisdom (sampajjana). Mindfulness means 'to remember' or 'keep in mind'. Sampajanna refers to whatever wisdom or right view is required in relation to a specific situation. In summary, mindfulness remembers to keep sampajanna (ready/situational wisdom or clear ...


2

which is better staying in present moment or being aware? To counterpose such sentences they should have particular definitions. I think that "staying in the present moment" is used as a synonym to "being aware", because minds of people usually aren't collected, i.e. they are scattered, distracted. They tend to be involved in repetitive ...


2

Meditation may result in you needing to sleep less, but it's not going to replace sleep. To give you an example, at sesshin, we'll meditate for 10-15 hours a day. By about the third day, not only am I well rested after about four hours of sleep, but I actually have trouble sleeping due to an increase in energy. In fact, one guy in our sangha spends his ...


2

Venerable Mahāmoggallāna struggled with drowsiness and the Buddha provided a list of suggestions laid out in AN7.61: AN7.61:1.3: Now at that time, in the land of the Magadhans near Kallavāḷamutta Village, Venerable Mahāmoggallāna was nodding off while meditating. ... AN7.61:2.3: “So, Moggallāna, don’t focus on or cultivate the perception that you were ...


1

There are several things going on in your nice question, & can also be so when people suggest such things: more than one concept may be being addressed. The thing about 'dont expect anything from anyone' etc may sound a bit stark/harsh if taken out from context, which it sometimes is. Expectations of others may involve some amount of evaluation, which is ...


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