6 votes

What is the difference between destruction of craving and cessation of craving?

According to Sanskrit dictionary, the two words have different connotations that I think are important for correct understanding of Buddhist doctrine. Pali kkhaya or Sanskrit kṣayā (kshaya) means &...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58k
5 votes

Looking for a clear explanation of "interdependent origination" in English (one that doesn't rely a lot of Buddhist terminology)?

The Wikipedia entry on dependent origination is pretty good and simple. Similarly there is a good essay called Dependent Arising by Piya Tan. In simple terms this is as follows: When the cause is ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

What is Indra's Net, according to Mahayana Buddhism?

There are two sets of Mahayana sutras: The seventeen Perfection of Wisdom sutras (Prajnaparamita Sutras), and The other sutras, of the Wheel of Perfect Differentiation. The first set does not ...
Tenzin Dorje's user avatar
  • 4,946
5 votes

What is intellect-consciousness and why is it different from intellect itself?

This is just bad translation. "Consciousness" is the common word for vijnana. A better translation of vijnana is "(subjective) experience". Meaning, you see something => you recognize it => you make ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58k
5 votes

Can we reach Nirvana without removing ignorance?

Maybe you've heard of the old South Indian Monkey Trap (from this article): In Zen And The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance, Robert Pirsig’s bonkers-but-brilliant philosophical novel that turns 40 ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 36.7k
5 votes

Is it true that whatever is subject to cessation is subject to origination?

Buddha said: yaṃ kiñci samudayadhammaṃ, sabbaṃ taṃ nirodhadhamman'ti or "whatever is samudaya-able -- all that is nirodha-able". Samudaya means "to come together", "to arise from coincidence of ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58k
5 votes

Why is “nibbana” considered to be “unconditioned”?

Good question. Nirvana/Nibbana is not a state of mind, rather it's a quality or an aspect that is always present regardless of any conditions, but even though it's always present it is not always seen....
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58k
5 votes

What exactly is the suffering of self views?

Having a view of a self — an identity, a sense of 'me' or 'mine', a mental object that is a locus of self-reference — brings suffering. We attach desires and aversions to it, asserting that this self-...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
  • 5,117
4 votes

Is there a contradiction in the translation of the Bhūmija Sutta?

There's no such contradiction. Karma can indeed be categorised as prompted and unprompted as in if it was instigated by another or not. What's refuted here is a person or a third party being able to ...
Sankha Kulathantille's user avatar
4 votes

How did the suffering of Gautama Buddha arise or co-arise?

"What, bhikkhus, is the Nibbana-element with residue left? Here a bhikkhu is an arahant, one whose taints are destroyed, the holy life fulfilled, who has done what had to be done, laid down the ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 36.7k
4 votes

Is causation (hetu) in SN 22.82 different to conditions (paccaya) in Dependent Origination?

It's a sublime Dharma, hard to understand, so let's examine some analogies. Modern physics says that there are electromagnetic waves, such as radio waves and visible light. We can imagine them as ...
chang zhao's user avatar
  • 1,503
4 votes

Is causation (hetu) in SN 22.82 different to conditions (paccaya) in Dependent Origination?

When you have questions of this kind, it is good to refer to the next two levels of Dhamma. One can always find the correct meanings to the key words that come up in reading the Sutta Pitaka in other ...
Saptha Visuddhi's user avatar
4 votes

Does Viññāṇa generate Nāmarūpa in the sense that would make "uploading concsciousness" impossible?

I don't understand the question. I just try to help. I write this answer by my guess the question's meaning. The past (vanished) moment does not "upload" anything to the moment which it affects. It ...
Bonn's user avatar
  • 6,187
4 votes

Misconception about remembering past lives?

However, my question is Buddha has never talked about past life as in life about past bodies before physical birth, if he has then please let me know. (Also, I have found that Jataka tales is ...
santa100's user avatar
  • 9,669
4 votes

Misconception about remembering past lives?

There's MN 36 for example which is translated like this: When my mind had immersed in samādhi like this—purified, bright, flawless, rid of corruptions, pliable, workable, steady, and imperturbable—...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.3k
4 votes

Is dependent co-arising an "IF AND ONLY IF A THEN B" relation?

OP: Does dependent co-arising have the same relation I've mentioned above? Yes. OP: If the answer is "yes" to the above question, as we know an Arahant has ceased the craving without ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 36.7k
4 votes

Is there a circular reasoning in origin of consciousness?

Yes, in my understanding it is circular. But first let us clarify our definitions. Translating vijnana as consciousness is misleading. Vijnana is differentiated subjective experience. In other words, ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58k
3 votes

Looking for a clear explanation of "interdependent origination" in English (one that doesn't rely a lot of Buddhist terminology)?

I too had a problem with this concept when I first began my studies. It was helpful to substitute "fixed" for "inherent" (after consulting the dictionary). If phenomena are fixed, then there can be ...
Bonnie Topits's user avatar
3 votes

Looking for a clear explanation of "interdependent origination" in English (one that doesn't rely a lot of Buddhist terminology)?

I think it's similar to the theory of cause-and-effect: if A causes B, then the origination of B depends on A. It may be a little vaguer than cause-and-effect (and for that reason I think it may be ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.3k
3 votes

Looking for a clear explanation of "interdependent origination" in English (one that doesn't rely a lot of Buddhist terminology)?

In our day to day perception, we see objects as "things-in-themselves" and this is useful to make those practical decisions we all have to make at every moment. Car (=object) is coming at me -> ...
Aarnout's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes

Can we reach Nirvana without removing ignorance?

The reason why you crave is because of ignorance. When you have a pleasurable experience, you like it because you do not see the Dukkha(suffering) nature of it. Without getting rid of ignorance, you ...
Sankha Kulathantille's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

How can Name-and-form be the cause and condition for the manifestation of the consciousness aggregate?

From the Mahanidana Sutta (DN15): "If one is asked, 'From what requisite condition does contact come?' one should say, 'Contact comes from name-and-form as its requisite condition.' "If ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 36.7k
3 votes

What is meant by statement "the one who sees Dhamma sees dependent origination"?

This very question is exactly the topic of The Rice Seedling Sutra (Salistamba Sutra), one of the earliest known post-canonical sutras that can be classified as a missing link between Early Buddhism ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58k
3 votes

Regarding Nicca and Anicca natures of Avidya and Prajna

If Tanha(craving) is caused by Avijja(ignorance) and if Avijja is sustained by Tanha, the cycle cannot be broken using Avijja and Tanha. But that doesn't mean it cannot be broken using something that ...
Sankha Kulathantille's user avatar
3 votes

'Sankhara' Dependent Origination: Bhikkhu Analayo vs Bhikkhu Thanissaro. Which is right?

Ajahn Thanissaro’s description is accurate. The 3 sankharas in MN44 is the same as SN12.2. Arahant’s sankhara is NOT conditioned by ignorance. Arahant’s sankhara arises and ceases with knowledge. ...
SeeMei Chan's user avatar

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