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As I understand, the relationship is that of mutual implication. This meaning is reflected in the name pratitya-samutpada, that is often translated as "dependent co-arising" and such. Mutual implication means one of the categories serves as context for the other and the other way around. Top is defined against bottom and vice verse. Life is defined against ...


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Here's a few of resources from our tradition: http://www.aimwell.org/dependentorigination.html - a book by the Mahasi Sayadaw, one of Burma's greatest meditation teachers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_llBSCXt6c - a video by me, some monk from the Internet http://www.sirimangalo.org/teachings/lessons-in-practical-buddhism/practical-dependent-...


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As per my understanding, Pratityasamutpada is not about simple cause-and-effect chaining. Starting from a name: pratitya means "based on", "in dependence on", sam- means "co-" or "together" and utpada means "arising" or "coming forth". Together Pratityasamutpada means "arising in dependence on each other" or "dependent co-arising" or "interdependent ...


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1. Do they stay together, and cause birth of a one specific person (which can be called rebirth), or do they separate? Even when you are alive, the 5 skandhas arise together in every experience. So when you ask "do they stay together", you are asking if the experience stays. No! The experience disappears immediately. There's no staying. The skandhas in this ...


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Suppose you completely empty your mind of all thoughts This is what happens when you go into deep sleep. When you don't dream, the mind falls back to the Bhavanga process. This is called the passive state of the mind. It is what keeps you alive, when there's no other thought. This Bhavanga process is the result of your birth Karma. Suppose that in that ...


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Dhamma Greetings Gawesaka, the answer is: No. The first word is Pāḷi and second and third are just different English renditions of that expression. Best Wishes


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Maybe you've heard of the old South Indian Monkey Trap (from this article): In Zen And The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance, Robert Pirsig’s bonkers-but-brilliant philosophical novel that turns 40 this year, he describes “the old South Indian Monkey Trap”. ... The trap “consists of a hollowed-out coconut, chained to a stake. The coconut has some rice ...


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Bhava-chakra, the wheel of life, or, as I would translate it, "the wheel of individuation" is a relatively late depiction of the 12 Nidanas. In the suttas of Pali Canon, the nidanas are usually presented as a list, that is reviewed both in forward as well as in reverse direction -- but never (to my knowledge!) as an infinite loop. If you read the wheel ...


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One must be quite careful with this formula. In fact it never mentions causation and in general early Buddhist texts do not. Even if it purported to be a theory of causation, it tells us nothing at all about causation. It simply tells us that one thing arises in the presence of another and ceases in its absence. Causality is a very tricky subject. As David ...


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When you breath be mindful of the start to end of the in and out breath. For each breath in and out breath be mindful of whether your mind wandered away during this time. Also note the length of the breath in and out breath. When scanning the body keep your concentration anchored on the breath and sensation on the base of the nose as well. If your mind ...


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Ultimately, Time exists only conceptually, i.e. as a mental formation. Thinking about past, present and future are mental events, happening in the present moment. We live only for one thought-moment at a time (momentary death). The mind might be chasing after some object or running away from another object but that also takes place in the present moment, ...


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The Buddha's Dharma is beautiful in the beginning, beautiful in the middle, and beautiful in the end. Absent need for addition or reduction. It would be overly simplistic to reduce the entire teaching to one doctrinal aspect - even if it were dependent origination. Having said that - one who sees dependent origination, sees the Dharma. One who sees the ...


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The Wikipedia entry on dependent origination is pretty good and simple. Similarly there is a good essay called Dependent Arising by Piya Tan. In simple terms this is as follows: When the cause is present, the effect arising from the cause is present as well When the cause arises, the effect arising from the cause arises as well When the cause is not ...


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There are two sets of Mahayana sutras: The seventeen Perfection of Wisdom sutras (Prajnaparamita Sutras), and The other sutras, of the Wheel of Perfect Differentiation. The first set does not present Indra’s net while the second does. Tibetan traditions posit the first set as being “of definite meaning” and therefore study it and overlook the second. They ...


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Buddha said: yaṃ kiñci samudayadhammaṃ, sabbaṃ taṃ nirodhadhamman'ti or "whatever is samudaya-able -- all that is nirodha-able". Samudaya means "to come together", "to arise from coincidence of multiple conditions". Nirodha means "to stop". So the meaning of the phrase is "Whatever arose from coincidence of multiple conditions will stop when one of ...


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I took a university course in Asian Philosophy and my professor explained emptiness this way: Nagarjuna makes the claim that an essence (a list of essential qualities that make a thing what it is) can only be stated in reference to other things. This is a way of saying that all things are defined in relation to other things, including samsara and nirvana. ...


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In pratityasamutpada there are actually eleven links, as each causal link occurs between one of twelve states. The relation is described as "yā tatra tathatā avitathatā anaññathatā idappaccayatā"—“that wherein is reality (tathatā), not unreality (avitathatā), not otherness (anaññathatā), specific conditionality: [that is called dependent origination]”, and ...


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In Theravada Buddhism, there are two kinds of bhava: kamma-bhava - the becoming that is kamma upapatti-bhava - the becoming that is coming-to-be The former is what is directly understood to be referred to in the teaching on dependent origination. It refers to the wholesome or unwholesome mental formation that constitutes volitional activity. It is the ...


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Where we don't have a choice: stop, maintain or prolong, create phenomena and influence, control arising and passing of phenomena. Even at a grosser level the influence is limited. Where we have a choice: not being reactive to sense stimulus but proactive to it influence and regulate your mind towards skillful states and away from unwholesome states ...


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Paticca Samuppada doesn't even include aversion. But that doesn't mean Vedana(feeling) doesn't lead to aversion. Just that in Paticca Samuppada we are focusing on what keeps us bound to Samsara. But if you talk about it in general, Vedana can lead to ignorance, craving and aversion. If the feeling is pleasant, craving is prominent. If the feeling is ...


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How is karma any different more believable than supernatural gods passing judgement when we are talking about rebirth after the point of death - rebirth being inextricably linked to karma? The implication here is that death somehow negates the causal nature of mind states that is observed in the present moment; along with our ability to hold grudges from ...


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Taṇhā doesn't automatically have to relate to neutral feelings. Remember, the twelve links of dependent origination are talking about nessisary causation, not sufficient causation, so when the Buddha says [W]ith feeling as condition, craving [comes to be] the meaning is that feeling is necessary for craving to arise, and without feeling, craving can ...


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There is more subtlety to the mind's relationship to feelings than only craving or aversion. The Vedanās and the underlying tendencies that arise are described in the Pahana Sutta (SN 36.3) like this: In the case of pleasant feelings, O monks, the underlying tendency to lust should be given up; in the case of painful feelings, the underlying tendency to ...


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Understanding time is an important part of insight into the nature of things. How can you understand the empty nature of entities if you don't understand their relationship with time? How can you be free of self, of the dictate of the form, if you don't see beyond time? In traditional literature this topic is famously addressed by the founding father of ...


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We can't see five aggregates as it is. We can see a men, animals, Devas. Or good thing, bad thing. Or a beautiful thing, a ugly thing etc. But in reality, there is nothing like that. Everything just a thing or collection of several things. We only making things matter to us. Nothing else. Refer this answer. If we took a tower build by stones, actually ...


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The first link of paṭiccasamuppāda is “avijjā paccayā saṅkhārā” (conditioned by ignorance, formations arise). Analyzing this from the perspective of the Abhidhamma: Ignorance is moha concomitant with the 12 akusala cittas Formations is cetanā (volition) in the 12 akusala cittas, cetanā in the 8 kāmāvacara kusala cittas, cetanā in the 5 rūpavacara kusala ...


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Out of the many many classifications Goenka's techniques uses the 5 fold classification (physical pleasant, physical painful, mental pleasant, mental painful, equanimous) Bodily Sensation is considered Vedana excluding Metal Sensation (Somanasa / Domanasa) as it is more a form of Kaya and Vedana Passana to start with though later if develops to Citta and ...


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There's no such contradiction. Karma can indeed be categorised as prompted and unprompted as in if it was instigated by another or not. What's refuted here is a person or a third party being able to create pain, pleasure or neutral feelings at will. Feelings arise due to contact. Ex: One cannot say "let there be pleasurable feeling at the ear" and make it ...


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"What, bhikkhus, is the Nibbana-element with residue left? Here a bhikkhu is an arahant, one whose taints are destroyed, the holy life fulfilled, who has done what had to be done, laid down the burden, attained the goal, destroyed the fetters of being, completely released through final knowledge. However, his five sense faculties remain unimpaired, ...


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It's a sublime Dharma, hard to understand, so let's examine some analogies. Modern physics says that there are electromagnetic waves, such as radio waves and visible light. We can imagine them as some surface where waves spread from the center: We can understand them by analogy with ocean waves: But there is a big difference: waves in the ocean have water ...


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