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The Buddha did in fact teach just this practice: Bhikkhus, you should train thus: ‘We will be devoted to wakefulness. During the day, while walking back and forth and sitting, we will purify our minds of obstructive states. In the first watch of the night, while walking back and forth and sitting, we will purify our minds of obstructive states. In the ...


8

Because you mention the Mahasi Sayadaw in your question, most relevant is the Mahasi Sayadaw's discussion of the Purabheda Sutta: http://static.sirimangalo.org/mahasi/Purabheda%20Sutta.htm (Sorry, the formatting is off in this version) There are some Pali phrases in that book that might be of interest, e.g.: Vītataṇho purābhedā, pubbamanta manissito. ...


7

Ledi Sayadaw -Vipassana movement pioneer. Extremely influential in spreading Vipassana Meditation among lay people. Considers the whole Tripitaka when formulating the meditation instructions of which many have their roots in the Abidhamma. Mohnyin Sayadaw Saya Thetgyi U Ba Khin - Lay student of Saya Thetgyi (student of Ledi Sayadaw) but highly influenced ...


6

Ven. Mahasi Sayadaw is a 20th century burmese meditation master. His teachings on Vipassana Meditation, also called Insight Meditation is derived from the so called "New Burmese Method". The following quote is from the wiki: "The vipassanā Movement, also called the Insight Meditation Movement, refers to a number of branches of modern Theravāda Buddhism ...


5

This doesn't quite answer the question, but because you said "I have got some illnesses due to this too" ... I find I'm bad with sweets. After I eat a sweet biscuit, I want another! After I eat a slice of bread, I want another! Apparently some people get addicted. Consider alcohol, for example: many people are able to drink a glass or two regularly; some ...


5

It is not Mahasi noting, but the core of the Buddha's teaching: Dependent origination(D0) and others. Depending on contact feeling arises, depending on feeling craving arises, depending on craving, clinging arises, depending on clinging becoming (this is when intention arises and action(kamma) begins. The first point is contact, don't go near food when it ...


5

While heavily focused on by western practitioners - meditation is only one aspect towards the cultivation of the mind. If unsupported by the right morality and faith, your mind will be too troubled and unfocused to concentrate on the object of your meditation. In the case of Anapanasati and Vipassana, your object is your breath - but even as you're ...


4

The Upajjhatthana Sutta five remembrances is used in the evening chanting by many Theravadin temples and monasteries. Five remembrances Below are two English translations and the original Pali text of the "five remembrances": I cannot avoid ageing. I am subject to aging, have not gone beyond aging. Jarādhammomhi jaraṃ anatīto.... I cannot avoid ...


4

Some advice by Ajaan Fuang here: § Many were the times when people would tell Ajaan Fuang that — with all the work and responsibilities in their lives — they had no time to meditate. And many were the times he'd respond, "And you think you'll have time after you're dead?" § "If you're single-minded about whatever you think of doing, you're ...


4

There are always many things happening in the body, your mind is getting distracted trying to focus on everything. You need to spend more time on your samatha (ex. anapana) practice, so that your mind can focus better on whatever object you direct it at in Vipassana. > edit: there seems to be some confusion..this didn't seem like a > distracted ...


4

Any type of meditation that is worth the name will increase concentration in a beginner. The body is a good first object of vipassana meditation because it is inescapable and we identify with it so strongly, so automatically all kinds of thoughts also get faced.


3

The earliest source for the enumeration of sixteen stages of knowledge that I know of is the Paṭisambhidāmagga, a treatise ascribed to Sāriputta, included in the Myanmar version of the Khuddaka Nikāya. So yeah, pretty standard Theravada. Discussion of the knowledges is found throughout the commentaries and makes up most of the section on wisdom in the ...


3

Because of the longer sits you are likely graduating to the higher Visuddhiñanas, such as Visuddhiñana #3: sammasana-ñana Seeing how each object, even while being noticed, comes to destruction and disappearance, the meditator comprehends it as impermanent in the sense of undergoing destruction. He further comprehends it as suffering (painful) in the ...


3

S.N. Goenka is a 20th century meditation master who developed a technique of meditation characterized by: Meditation in this style is taught through these centers


3

There are the 5 five hindrances that stand in the way as obstacles for developing in ones practice and for reaching Nibbana. In brief the five hindrances are: Sensual Desire (kámacchanda) Aversion or Ill-will (vyápáda) Sleepiness – sloth (thina), torpor (middha), sluggishness Restlessness – worry about the future, regret of the past, anxiety (uddhacca-...


3

In Aṅguttara Nikāya, Chakka Nipāta there are two discourses that helps the development of contemplation on death. "... whoever develops mindfulness of death, thinking, 'O, that I might live for the interval that it takes to swallow having chewed up one morsel of food... for the interval that it takes to breathe out after breathing in, or to ...


3

In The Dhammapada there are the Verse 46: The King of Death. "Verse 46: One who knows that this body is impermanent like froth, and comprehends that it is insubstantial like a mirage, will cut the flowers of Mara (i.e., the three kinds of vatta or rounds), and pass out of sight of the King of Death." Here is a video dhamma talk on The Dhammapada ...


3

The Seven Stages of Purification are summarised in the Visuddhimagga (The Path of Purification), a 5th century Theravada text (about 800 years after the Buddha lived). the seven visuddhis come from the Ratha-vinita Sutta (MN 24), and the sixteen stages of knowledge are found in the Patisambhidamagga. – yuttadhammo This comparison between practice ...


3

I'm not familiar with Yuttadhammo Bhikku, but from a short look at his teaching I believe the key is that one should not be noting things; one should be noting mind movements. For instance, looking at the discussion of vipassana on his website, he says this: The Four Foundations of Mindfulness are: Body: Noting the body while prostrating, walking, ...


2

Jack Kornfield. Student of Ajahn Chah. Co-founder of the Insight Meditation Society. Author of many books including After the Ecstasy, the Laundry and a Path with Heart


2

When meditation is not forced, meditation comes spontaneously. When meditation comes spontaneously, awakening comes quickly. When awakening comes quickly, your meditation practice becomes the best practice. Any meditation practice, if not forced, becomes the best practice. There is no one practice better than the other. Choose one, don't force it (or ...


2

I believe that some foundation for this way of practicing can be derived from the "Five Spiritual Faculties (when fully developed they are called the Five Powers)". These are briefly: Mindfulness (sati) Energy (viriya) Concentration (samadhi) Faith (saddha) Wisdom (paññā) These five faculties must be balanced in order for one to progress on the path. A ...


2

If you are looking for reading material, here are some good resources: http://www.sirimangalo.org/teachings http://www.saraniya.com/page/ebooks/ebooks-mahasi-sayadaw.html http://www.yellowrobe.com/books/mahasi-sayadaw/237-books-by-mahasi-sayadaw.html If you are looking to follow a course, it depends on where you are or where you can travel to. If you are ...


2

Try one of these to slow down your mind: Follow your breath Follow the representation of your breath Walking meditation Concentration meditation (upon an object) Keep the body still with eyes closed Practice these in a quiet place. Usually within five to ten minutes you will notice a difference.


2

A way to deal with this is to restrain the mind by choosing to note only experiences from e.g. the 1st and 2nd foundation of mindfulness. One could also start with only one foundation and then add more when mindfulness grows. It's similar as to when one is starting to do walking meditation. One will start by noting only the "stepping" movement of the foot. ...


2

What do a great pianist, a great martial artist, and a great scientist have in common? They work their butts off to perfect their skills. And these are just mundane skillset, not supra-mundane one. The suttas use a popular simile to express the urgency to practice the Dhamma: one should train as if one's clothes or head is on fire! While the exact amount of ...


2

Mindfulness should be from awakening to falling asleep, i.e., throughout the day. Formal practice time is just a booster and practice to keep your mindfulness thought out the day.


2

Venerable Pesala's translation is greatly abridged. We read it recently in our study group and while it's quite good, he leaves out a lot of interesting passages. I recommend if you have time to read the full translation by Rhys-Davids. It is very old, but well done I think. We eventually switched to the Rhys-Davids version to read all the similes at the end....


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