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When the Buddha speaks of worlds he is talking about that in the world by which the world is perceived & conceived because that is what is called a world in that training. There are many subjective frames of percepience by which the world is conceived and no two frames of perception are the same. It is proven that there is no simultaneity of perceived ...


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The sutta SN 16.1 is about contentment. From SN 16.1: At Savatthī. “Bhikkhus, this Kassapa is content with any kind of robe, and he speaks in praise of contentment with any kind of robe, and he does not engage in a wrong search, in what is improper, for the sake of a robe. If he does not get a robe he is not agitated, and if he gets one he uses it without ...


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I'm not sure what the Pali word for "contentment" might be -- perhaps there are several, with different shades of meaning -- the first I heard of was sukha Sukha (Sanskrit, Pali; Devanagari: सुख) means happiness, pleasure, ease, joy or bliss, in Sanskrit and Pali. Among the early scriptures, 'sukha' is set up as a contrast to 'preya' (प्रेय) ...


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One has to find contentment in striving. Here and beyond he suffers. The wrong-doer suffers both ways. He suffers and is tormented to see his own depraved behaviour. Here and beyond he is glad. The doer of good is glad both ways. He is glad and rejoices to see his own good deeds - Dhp Monks, there are these four modes of practice. Which four? Painful ...


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In my humble view, the factor of Right Effort might address this question: The Buddha doesn't say, "Don't make an effort, be content," but rather the Buddha says, "Make an effort towards the right things." In SN 45:8 the Buddha explains that there are four things that deserve a monk's effort: And what, monks, is right effort? (i) There ...


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