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As studies says 10,000 hours of practice usually makes an expert in your field, be it athletes, musician, doctors, engineers or any profession.

So I was wondering if I start doing 10 days course every month and practice 10 hours of meditation daily, so it will take 8.33 years to complete 10000 hours of meditation, which may not enlighten me but for sure it should make me an Expert.

How logical is that because I really want to know myself more, and I know that story of boy asked how much time will it take and master said 10 years and then he said what if i do more hard work he said then it will take 20 years, what is the essence here.

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    It depends on how committed you are to the practice of the noble eightfold path - as at the very least it takes only seven days, and it takes only seven years the most. It is a "Dharmatha" - a Principles of Dhamma - A natural phenomena. If someone could expand on this, it is much appreciated. – Saptha Visuddhi Feb 22 '17 at 11:56
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    It's the conclusion of the Satipatthana Sutta (MN 10). – ChrisW Feb 22 '17 at 12:35
  • This is a very thought provoking question for me. I'm not sure it has a clear answer, but maybe the question could be "should I spend as much time as possible meditating in order to achieve enlightenment" :) That seems much better than "does 10,000 = enlightenment". I hope this comment helps! – user10875 Feb 24 '17 at 7:06
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    @DoritoStyle you are right, I have been hearing a lot about Malcolm Gladwell's 10,000 Hour Rule, So I asked this question and please don't be angry as buddha said "anger is like drinking poison and expecting other person to die" .... :) thanks – Ritesh.mlk Feb 24 '17 at 7:19
  • So long as there is clinging and attachment to the destination (enlightenment), the journey is forever incomplete. Additionally, conflating enlightenment with expertise in a technique is a fallacy. – Rich Wermske Feb 26 '17 at 22:04
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Last part of the Maha-satipatthana Sutta

"Now, if anyone would develop these four frames of reference in this way for seven years, one of two fruits can be expected for him: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return.

"Let alone seven years. If anyone would develop these four frames of reference in this way for six years... five... four... three... two years... one year... seven months... six months... five... four... three... two months... one month... half a month, one of two fruits can be expected for him: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return.

"Let alone half a month. If anyone would develop these four frames of reference in this way for seven days, one of two fruits can be expected for him: either gnosis right here & now, or — if there be any remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return.

"'This is the direct path for the purification of beings, for the overcoming of sorrow & lamentation, for the disappearance of pain & distress, for the attainment of the right method, & for the realization of Unbinding — in other words, the four frames of reference.' Thus was it said, and in reference to this was it said."

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, the monks delighted in the Blessed One's words. DN 22

So basically, depends on the individual!

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  • what are four frames of reference and what is the meaning of remnant of clinging-sustenance — non-return – Ritesh.mlk Feb 23 '17 at 4:23
  • "There is the case where a monk remains focused on the body in & of itself — ardent, alert, & mindful — putting aside greed & distress with reference to the world. He remains focused on feelings... mind... mental qualities in & of themselves — ardent, alert, & mindful — putting aside greed & distress with reference to the world." - Body, feelings, mind and mental qualities. Remnant of clinging is any attachment, or aversion (?) to any of the four. – Ilya Grushevskiy Feb 23 '17 at 9:18
  • Why do they repeat one thing so many times, I still do not understand, please write yourself this seems to be pasted from else where – Ritesh.mlk Feb 23 '17 at 9:24
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    It's from Digha Nikaya 22 (the small link in the original quote). The repetition is due to the fact the Pali Canon was an oral tradition and really had to be memorised. In addition, the Buddha's message was not convoluted - the Four Noble Truths, which revolve around Impermanence, Suffering and non-self are 'quite short' in exposition, relative to Essentialist or Nihilistic philosophies, which have to justify their beliefs with contrived logic and reason. Once Anicca, Dukkha and Anatta are accepted, attachment to any condition of being is inherently counterproductive. – Ilya Grushevskiy Feb 23 '17 at 9:34
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    @Rishi I'm don't think it would be useful to expand each individual tenant or rephrase entire passages on this site. That seems to fit squarely in the "too broad" close reason (although I'm not yet sure how this beta site plans to address that concern). – user10875 Feb 24 '17 at 5:53
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I think you are coming at this from the wrong place. Enlightenment isn't something that we add to ourselves. It's best not to approach meditation as another skill to master or the dharma as another field where we might gain expertise. It really doesn't make sense to count your practice in hours, days, or years. Buddhism isn't a transaction - it's an offering that can't be measured by any metric. Ultimately, there is no upper limit to how much we can sacrifice ourselves.

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Load Buddha (Maha Bodhisattva) practice 7 years, but failed. He realised that is not the path for purification. So he give up arnapana practice (pranayama meditation). Then he change his practice to Anapanasathi practice, describe as Ariyapariyesana suttha, sathipattana suttha and other suttas in Tripitaka.

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