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An physical allergic reaction happens when the immune system is activated when it is not really necessary and harms more than it helps.

Dukkha can perhaps be the result of activity of the ego against things which actionally doens't harm you.

So can you say suffering is due to an allergic ego?

  • dukkha is due to tanha (craving). dependent origination states, that craving is conditioned by feeling, contact ... ignorance. What do you mean by 'ego'? – OidaOudenEidos May 1 '16 at 18:20
  • @OidaOudenEidos I think that "ego" refers to notions of "self" and/or "identity" -- for example including "I", "me", and "mine". – ChrisW May 5 '16 at 8:23
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Dukkha can perhaps be the result of activity of the ego against things which actionally doens't harm you.

When you experience a contract, the reaction of consciousness is to give a sensation of pleasantness, unpleasantness or neutral sensation. Another habitual response that follows is craving or aversion to this. [Dhātu Vibhaṅga Sutta, Titth’ayatana Sutta, Sal-āyatana Vibhanga Sutta] This is not necessarily the ego going against anything but habitual reaction. Ego is created due to thought patterns which follow, due to craving. [Tanhā Jālinī Sutta, (Vicarita) Tanha Sutta]. The main thing is not to react to sensations, being completely equanimous and knowing their arising and passing nature. [Pahāna Sutta] If you react - with aversion, craving or ignorance - then only it becomes harmful, as this will create fabrication, which result in future karmic manifestations. Also, in the present, if they are pleasant and change then disappointment follows. [Cula Vedalla Sutta]

So can you say suffering is due to an allergic ego?

You can say it is due to allergic reaction to sense experiences with craving and aversion.

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As already explained, in Buddhism, all suffering arises from craving & clinging. Therefore physical illness, while generating unpleasant feelings (sensations), does not in itself create suffering. For example, when the Buddha was dying, he experienced vicious physical pain but did not suffer. Mentally distinguishing between unpleasant sensations & mental suffering is part of the Buddhist training.

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