Ted Wrigley
  • Member for 2 years, 6 months
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If there is no literal rebirth, why have samvega (a sense of urgency)
3 votes

A question like this calls for a certain amount of philosophizing, so forgive me if I reach past traditional teachings for a moment. It seems to me that people tend to approach the question of karma ...

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Is it OK for a Buddhist teacher to charge their students an hourly rate for their time?
3 votes

Hm. What exactly will this person be teaching you? Buddhist philosophy? Proper sitting posture? Some special 'technique'? Most buddhist things you can learn for free from other teachers, so in what ...

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Mahasi Sayadaw Noting Method (mostly as taught by Yuttadhammo Bhikku): Help with mindfulness during daily activities?
3 votes

I'm not familiar with Yuttadhammo Bhikku, but from a short look at his teaching I believe the key is that one should not be noting things; one should be noting mind movements. For instance, looking at ...

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Is Vajrayana the fastest and only way to enlightenment? Bön & Shaivism
3 votes

Buddhism at its core is non-dogmatic. It has a number of precepts and principles, but does not ask its practitioners to believe anything in particular. Because of that, when Buddhism expands into a ...

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A beginner facing Culadasa
3 votes

"If you meet the Buddha on the road, kill him." Err... not literally... The point of this quip is that attachment to a teacher is itself something that must be overcome. Even if you are lucky enough ...

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Is the whole of reality what is being denied by some Buddhists?
2 votes

If you pick up a bowl of water and carry it across the room to a table, the water will splash against the sides of the bowl and develop eddies and waves as you move. If you come back an hour later, ...

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Should a Buddhist be afraid of death?
2 votes

I think you've probably misunderstood your friend's actions. I mean, I myself have no real fear of death, but I would certainly prefer not to get smacked by a speeding car. It's not that it would kill ...

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Why aren't there omnicidal Buddhists?
2 votes

Well, I suppose the initial problem (from a reincarnationist perspective) is that once one is on the karmic wheel the only way off is live and attain nirvana. If all living beings were killed, then we ...

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Xin Ling Fa Men 心灵法门 - New "Buddhism"?
2 votes

There are a lot of people like this 'Master Lu' in the world, in every faith and religion, with small groups of followers or large. Most are honest, many are indifferent, some are charlatans, a few ...

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anapanasati: nimitta or ambient light?
Accepted answer
2 votes

The key phrase in your question is "I sometimes doubt [...]". The "I" in this phrase is your mind entering to question your meditation practice, because that's what the thinking ...

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Are lives of people who have, by birth or design, large amounts of money, worth more to the Buddha, than the poor?
2 votes

Which is more likely: a poor man who has no attachments to his poverty or a rich man who has no attachments to his riches? Worthiness is an evaluation; an evaluation is a comparison; a comparison ...

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What makes someone take rebirth with non heterosexual inclinations?
2 votes

Human society as a whole has a deep and abiding attachment to the concepts of masculinity and femininity. We see it in every culture, every time period, every place and nation. Nothing creates tanhā ...

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Compulsive desire to correct others
Accepted answer
2 votes

The core of this problem is that you are clinging to the idea that your views are correct. This has nothing to do with the question of whether your ideas are actually or factually correct, which they ...

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How can someone integrate the Buddhist philosophy on life's purpose into daily life?
2 votes

When a person pursues a goal, there are two things to be considered: The pursuit, which exists only in the past and the future. Pursuit implies a belief that something can be other than it is; it ...

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Elaboration of Vasubandhu's argument for the possibility of mental appearances to be publicly sharable?
2 votes

I took the time to read through the 20 Verses — interesting read — and then I returned to this question, and I have to say that the first thing that sprang up in my mind was and old, old joke: An ...

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Anatta and the question of motivation
2 votes

Anatta is a difficult and often misunderstood concept. When Buddhists talk about no-self, they mean it in the context of self-conceptualization: a mental object that is identified as the 'self'. In ...

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Former hedonist started with Samatha, worried about dukkha nanas
2 votes

The end point of practice is liberty: not the commonly-heard but overly simplistic notion pf political liberty, but the essential principle that underpins that concept. Unfortunately, this sense of ...

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Is there a tremendous decrease in suffering at stream-entry?
2 votes

In some ways this is a trick question, because the meaning of suffering in the Buddhist sense is different from the meaning of suffering in the colloquial English sense. In the Buddhist sense, ...

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Does kamma define the universal law of cause & effect?
2 votes

In its simplest and clearest sense, karma is merely the recognition that the universe is a cohesive and coherent whole, not a collection of individual things moving independently of each other. When ...

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A view of the self
2 votes

If a very young child looks in a mirror, it sees an object there that it cannot identify as itself. A slightly older child recognizes that the object it sees in the mirror is itself. A bit older than ...

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Is Enlightenment a momentum with a continuum or can have regressions?
2 votes

Do you see an old woman or a young one? Or can you see both? Once you've seen, can you forget how to see it? Until we see the world as it is we don't see it, but once we've seen it we cannot 'unsee'. ...

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Do we have to believe that good people exists?
2 votes

Believing that good people exist is like believing that young children will mature in wisdom and intelligence. Sometimes it's hard to watch a two year old in the middle of a tantrum and think "...

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when one Citta perishes,from where does the next arise?
2 votes

You might as easily ask where the next wave comes from once a wave has crashed on the beach. The answer is that the wave is not the water. The wave is the result of movement within the water, of ...

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How to show compassion for attention-seeker
2 votes

Ah, the story of the Bengali Tea Boy: When the great Buddhist teacher Atisha went to Tibet [...] he was told the people of Tibet were very good-natured, earthy, flexible, and open; he decided they ...

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How do we know attaining complete liberation from dukkha is possible?
2 votes

When we practice by sitting in meditation, we will (in a fairly short time) reach a state where tanhā and dukkha 'spontaneously' disappear, if only for a moment or two. I'm not even talking about a ...

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Why there is limited sharing in Buddhism
2 votes

It's a general precept in all sects of Buddhism that the dharma should be given freely to any who ask. But at the same time, Buddhism has never been a proselytizing faith — a faith that actively tries ...

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Reason of pandemics
2 votes

We shouldn't really think of karma as 'punishment' or 'retribution'; karma isn't a moral force. If a man throws a boomerang and the boomerang swings back around and hits him, he isn't being punished ...

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Why is 'dukkha' included in one of the three marks of existence?
2 votes

First, I'd be a bit careful about ascribing a causal relationship between dukkha and tanhā ('discontentment' and 'craving'). If I remember correctly there is a long-running debate among scholars about ...

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What are the differences between sex cults and the tantric tradition?
2 votes

First, a cult in the proper sense is simply a group of people who follow the practices of a single teacher. Cults are not inherently bad, and in fact most established faiths are technically cults to ...

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About suffering, expectations and unfalsifiable beliefs
Accepted answer
2 votes

The Buddhist problematic isn't about whether beliefs are true or false, or provable or unprovable. It's about whether we cling to beliefs, because the clinging itself creates dukkha. So for instance,...

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