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Some scholars, notably Dan Lusthaus, have argued that Yogācāra is not a form of Idealism. Lusthaus is one of the leading living authorities on Yogācāra and author of the authoritative analysis, Buddhist Phenomenology. The charge of Idealism is simply a mistaken reading of Yogācāra. For example in the introduction to his paper, What is and isn't Yogācāra he ...


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In my understanding, everything Nagarjuna talks about endlessly revolves around one theme - that is of imputation and reification of abstractions, which leads to confusion of the phenomenological with the ontological, which leads to conflicts, and suffering. As was customary in the ancient times he goes over endless examples of the same kind of argument over ...


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According to Kagyu understanding, Yogacara's position isn't metaphysical, it is methodological. It's not that the external world does not exist, it is that our experience of the world is 100% always represented by organs and/or mind, there is no experience outside of that, so practically speaking mind-made experience is "all we have"* Which is why trying to ...


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Yogacara as a distinct institutional school of Buddhism is almost totally extinct. There are two temples of the Hosso sect (which is the only remaining sect of Buddhism that calls itself Yogacara) of Buddhism in Japan ( Kōfuku-ji and Yakushi-ji) but that's really about it. However, Yogacara as a distinct theoretical school has been preserved both in East ...


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Shankara is Advaita Vedanta, a branch of Hindu philosophy inspired by Buddhism, so why are we talking about him? I guess you were reading his critics of Buddhism and this is what you ask? Your confusion about "infinite regress" comes from your materialistic assumption that separate objects exist in and of themselves, without observers. But in reality, ...


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Downplaying the external world (is "external world" quite the same as 'form (rūpa)'?), saying that our ideas of it are reified fabrications of the mind created from (or dependent on) sense-contact, seems to me a feature even of the Pali suttas ... with the proviso that nihilism (e.g. "There is nothing given, nothing offered, etc."), and ...


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Mahayana Buddhists do NOT believe that the whole world and all objects are literally created by the mind. Yogacara and especially Mahayana is not a form of subjective idealism, that's a popular urban myth/misunderstanding. "the people they see in front of them have consciousness and sensations (individual mindstreams)" - yes of course. "but ...


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Let's say there's a person called George, who is a lay single unmarried man, aged 39, and is strongly interested in Buddhism. Now let's take a look at other people around him. Let's say his friend Tom, is of the same age and is happily married with 3 kids. He looks at George and pities him for being single and not having his own family. He thinks about ...


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The Tattvasiddhi Śāstra, also called the Satyasiddhi Śāstra, is an extant abhidharma text written by Harivarman, a 4th-century monk from central India. Harivarman is often thought to come from the Bahuśrutīya school, but the Tattvasiddhi contains teachings more similar to those of the Sautrāntika Sarvāstivādins. This abhidharma is now contained in the ...


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In Mind-Only school of Buddhism, there is something called the 8 consciousnesses. The 8th consciousnes, aka the alaya storehouse consciousness, similar to an "Akashic record." It is an easily misunderstood concept according to the Surangama Sutra and the late Zen Master Huai-Chin Nan's lectures because apparently one can easily become confused about it. ...


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Shinshu Buddhism also refers to this http://amida-ji-retreat-temple-romania.blogspot.com/2011/12/alaya-storehouse-consciousness-and.html The alaya consciousness or storehouse consciousness is the place where all the actions and experiences in this life and the previous lives generated by the seven consciousnesses are stored as karma, being the only ...


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Thrangu Rinpoche once said that everything we see (all phenomena we experience) is our own projection - except other people's minds. Only other people's subjective experience is not our projection and therefore exists independently of us.


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They don't believe that. That's an almost universal misunderstanding. Yogacara doesn't make any ontological statements about the universe, perception, reality, and so forth. Their approach was strictly soteriological. They were exclusively concerned with liberating the mind, not with describing things as they are. What Yogacara is concerned about is how ...


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Let me try to answer your question in two parts. First, you mention Wm. Lane Craig's argument against the possibility of an infinite regress. But Paul Kabay, in his article An Infinite Temporal Regress Is Compatible with the "Doctrine of Creatio Originans" argues that: the existence of an infinite temporal regress does not undermine the soundness ...


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I took the time to read through the 20 Verses — interesting read — and then I returned to this question, and I have to say that the first thing that sprang up in my mind was and old, old joke: An optimist looks and sees a glass that's half full A pessimist looks and sees a glass that's half empty An engineer looks and sees a glass that's twice as big as it ...


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There is a famous allegory in Mahayana Buddhism relating three different beings' experience of the very same cup of liquid. The first being is a God, the second is a human, and the third is a hungry ghost. To the God, the cup full of liquid is experienced as a golden chalice full of the most wonderful crystal clear ambrosia giving off a mesmerizing scent. To ...


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Why does good householder Ilya, so long and often wisely involved, as such a fullish question, actually knowing for her self? Why would on join a "Tathagata-form" at first place, if perceiving him as common? Everybody, seeing the Dhamma could see the Tathagata, and in as far every not blind person could reach same "Tathagata-hood", once ...


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It is not personification. There is evidence that Gotama Buddha exists in India. He is special so he was called Samma Sambuddha. ================ when the Buddha is designated a sammā Sambuddha, "a perfectly enlightened one," this highlights not only the fullness of his enlightenment but his authority and reliability as a spiritual teacher. https://...


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Objects or entities or individual phenomena are delineated according to our (learned/acquired) interpretative framework. Their delineation depends on the scale of observation and the chosen evaluation criteria. They don't exist delineated ontologically. Same for the concept of "matter". It's just one way of seeing/describing what could be described ...


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Don't quite agree with the other answers so I'll try and flesh out the differences. First, it is important to understand that the cittamatra view is not the pinnacle of prajnaparamita. It is one stop that some beings need to arrive at before reaching the pinnacle of the perfection of wisdom. Second, it is important to know that although the Laṅkāvatāra ...


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I think Cittamatra texts do explicitly refute it. Vasubhandu's Twenty Stanzas and autocommentary is a text that gives logical arguments against the presence of an external world. The very begining of this text reads: "The three realms are consciousness only" of the Mahayana is established through the scriptural expression, "the three realms are mind ...


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See Traleg Rinpoche: "The influence of Yogacara on Mahamudra" (KTD Publications) "Mind at Ease: Self-liberation through Mahamudra Meditation" (Shambhala Publications) The former is for in-depth scholarly treatment, the latter book has less in-depth info for contextualization of the view in Mahamudra as influenced by Yogacara.


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Thich Nhat Hanh uses concepts and teachings from the yogacara school and has written about it. The Book is called "Understanding Our Mind." There is also "Living Yogacara" by Shun'ei Tagawa from the Hosso School in Japan which is very insightful as well.


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Here's one additional point. The other very astute answers have dealt with possible philosophical distinctions between these two. The only point lacking as a difference between these two in the other excellent answers I see is that Yogacara Buddhism is not simply a philosophical take on reality or experience. So, in elaborating the difference between them, ...


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It's important also to note that the mind spoken of in Western idealism is only restricted to what Yogacara calls the sixth consciousness. Using this definition, Yogaracara is definitely not idealism, as it does not suggest that the sixth consciousness produces external reality and ultimately exist. The sixth consciousness is itself dependent on conditions ...


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Yes each of the 1st three aggregates seem to have some resemblance to the 8 consciousnesses don't they? The form aggregate is the "forming" of a reality through the aid of the first 6 consciousnesses (this reality, according to modern physics, does not exist!), the sensation aggregate is like an "emotional judgement" of sensory input, whereas the third ...


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